crime
Man Gets 20 Years in Jail for Trying to Steal a Domain Name at Gunpoint

There were 332,198 robberies in the US last year according to the FBI, but (probably) only one of them involved a man trying to forcibly steal a domain name. Now the man responsible for the bizarre instance of domain hijacking will spend 20 years in prison. Read More >>

amazon
Oh Cool, Amazon is Peddling Conspiracy Theories Now

Amazon Prime Video, the streaming service you turn to when Netflix doesn’t have what you’re looking for, is best known for shows like Transparent, The Man In the High Castle, and *checks notes* films claiming the government is run by human-reptile hybrids. Read More >>

twitter
Judge Rules White Supremacist Can Sue Twitter for Banning Him

A California judge decided Thursday not to throw out a lawsuit filed against Twitter that accused the company of violating the free speech rights of white supremacist Jared Taylor when Twitter banned him from the platform late last year. Read More >>

google
Google Translate Can’t Provide Consent for a Police Search, Judge Rules

Google Translate is a useful tool for some quick and easy translations, but a federal judge in Kansas, US ruled this week that the machine translation service isn’t good enough to allow a person to consent to a police search. Read More >>

privacy
GDPR is Killing Email Marketing, to the Disappointment of No One

For the past month or so, inboxes the world over have been awash with emails about updated privacy policies and new permissions required by the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). You probably haven’t been reading those emails, and that’s bad news for email marketers. Read More >>

instagram
Instagram No Longer Notifies People If You Screenshot Their Stories So You Can Creep In Peace Again

Creepers, rejoice: after several months of testing, Instagram has killed a feature that alerted users when someone took a screenshot of their Stories. Long live the ability to discretely throw shade at all of your online frenemies! Read More >>

apple
iPhone Hackers May Already Have a Workaround for Police to Crack Apple’s Newest Security Feature

Apple and the law enforcement community have been stuck in a back-and-forth over encryption for the last few years, and it’s heated up considerably this month since Apple announced a feature that would thwart a popular iPhone cracking method used by police. Now, the companies that work with law enforcement have responded, and they’re pretty sure they already have a workaround. Read More >>

china
China to Make RFID Chips Mandatory in Cars So the Government Can Track Citizens on the Road

The Chinese government, in its ongoing pursuit to create the dystopian police state dreamed up in many a science fiction tale, is reportedly readying a new vehicle identification system that will be capable of monitoring the movement of citizens. Read More >>

google
Google Is Maybe Kinda Trying to Get the Pixelbook Windows 10 Certified

Google’s laptop-tablet hybrid Pixelbook has been given high praise by critics and users for its functionality and design, but the device suffers from one critical flaw: It runs Chrome OS, Google’s own, underpowered operating system. New reports suggest that may change soon, as Google is supposedly exploring the possibility of getting the Pixelbook certified to work with Windows 10. Read More >>

uber
Uber is Trying to Patent an AI System to Identify Erratic Behaviour in Riders

It looks like Uber has a growing interest in the behaviours of its users. According to a patent application filed by the company Thursday, Uber is planning to use machine learning to better understand the “state” of a passenger when they request a ride. Read More >>

amazon
Factory Making Amazon Products in China Violated All Kinds of Labour Laws

Factory workers in China tasked with building Amazon’s popular Echo speakers and Kindle e-readers are exposed to horrendous work environments and conditions that often are in violation of Chinese law, a recent report from a watchdog group found. Read More >>

immigration
Canada’s ‘Random’ Immigration Lottery Uses Microsoft Excel, Which Isn’t Actually Random

Last year, Canada introduced a new lottery system used to extend permanent-resident status to the parents and grandparents of Canadian citizens. The process was designed to randomly select applicants in order to make the process fairer than the old first-come, first-served system. There’s just one problem: the software used to run the lottery isn’t actually random. Read More >>

facebook
Surprise, Facebook Reportedly Gave Companies Your Friends’ Data After it Said it Wouldn’t

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before, but it looks like Facebook may have been sharing more of your data than you thought it was. The Wall Street Journal reported Friday that the social network cut deals with a number of companies to provide access to user records and friend data even after its policy change that prevented apps from scraping that very information. Read More >>

security
China Hacked a Navy Contractor and Stole 600GB of Data

Hackers working for the Chinese government compromised a US Navy contractor and stole a massive cache of highly sensitive data, including details about a planned supersonic anti-ship missile, American officials said Friday. Read More >>

google
Google Could Face Up to £8 Billion Fine From EU for Android Antitrust Violations

Facebook has been on the receiving end of a lot of government scrutiny in recent months, but it looks like Google’s turn is coming soon. According to a report from Politico, the European Commission is preparing to hand down its decision on an antitrust investigation into the search giant’s Android mobile operating system. A fine against the company is expected to be announced in July. Read More >>