laptops
We Opened Up These Supercharged Gaming Laptops to See Their Upgradeable Guts

Laptops haven’t been really upgradable in a while. Sure you could switch out the storage or memory on some, but as laptops have gotten thinner and thinner, even those components have become permanently a part of the devices. So it was a big deal when Alienware showed off the new Area-51m at CES. Yes, it’s a 17.3-inch beast that starts at £2,200 and can go up to £3,800, but you can also upgrade the storage, memory, and even the CPU and GPU as time goes by. Read More >>

apple
Why Would Anyone Buy an iPad Mini in 2019

The iPad Mini is not the best tablet Apple makes (that’s the 11-inch iPad Pro). It’s not the good enough tablet either (that’s the iPad Air). It’s the awkward one. A little too small, but a little too big, and demanding a fairly radical change to how you operate a tablet if you’ve been using any other iPad before. But boy, after a week of using the newly refreshed Mini, I’m still finding it awfully damn appealing. The iPad Mini is the true content consumption queen. Read More >>

google
Google Is Serving Ads on Very Expensive TVs

Boy that big gorgeous Sony TV you spent a paycheck on is nice, too bad Google has implemented a “pilot” programme that now serves ads on it. Sony’s televisions, as well as the Nvidia Shield and other products running the latest version of Android TV, has been hit with an irritating update from Google that serves ads on the home page, and no, there’s no super easy way to get rid of the ads. Read More >>

microsoft
Microsoft Nukes Its Ebooks Store, and That’s Probably for the Best

Big companies like to get bigger, and for many big tech companies these days, the clearest path to growth is increasing how much money generates with content services. That’s why Apple launched a whole slew of them last week, and why Google announced a video game platform the week before. Microsoft too has envisioned itself as a rival for your entertainment media dollar. So it sells TV shows, and games, and movies, and until yesterday, books. Read More >>

laptops
Following Colossal Scandal, Toshiba Is Back With a Barrage of New Laptops

Toshiba laptops seemed to have disappeared from shelves in recent years, but they’re finally coming back with a new name. From here on out Toshiba’s computer business will be called Dynabook in the US and Europe, and it’s going to be launching a tonne of laptops. Read More >>

apple
Apple Used Its Oprah Moment to Pull One Over on Us

I will admit it – I fangirled over Oprah. Not to her face. She was some 30 feet from me, on stage in a long flowing Colonel Sanders getup that very few people could pull off (Oprah did). I fangirled over Alfre Woodard and Jason Momoa, too. I thought about how short Steve Spielberg looked on stage, and about how thick and luxurious Ewan McGregor’s hair is. The celebrities were in full attendance at Monday’s Apple event, and it was very clear, hours later, that they’d been there to distract from the fact that Apple had nothing to say. Read More >>

google
No One Knows How Users Will Pay for Google Stadia Yet, But an Ad-Supported Model May Be Tricky

This week, Google announced its fancy new Stadia game-streaming service to the world—though the question of just how the tech giant is planning on monetising it remains quite open. It’s not clear whether users will gain access to Stadia’s stable of games by purchasing individual titles, paying a monthly subscription fee, or even be able to play for free in an ad-supported model. Read More >>

google
How Will Google Overcome Stadia’s Biggest Obstacle?

The problem with a gaming platform that relies entirely on the internet is that it relies on the internet. Stadia, Google’s new streaming game platform, will require that users have a robust internet connection to work, and that’s a big problem. “It’s what has plagued game streaming from the beginning,” said Pat Moorhead, Principal Analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy. A game streaming service simply can’t work if there’s lag. And in America, there’s a lot of lag. Read More >>

gaming
Ray Tracing Is Coming to a Whole Lot of GPUs

If you thought ray tracing was only going to be possible on Nvidia’s pricey line of Turing GPUs you would be wrong. Today the company has announced ray tracing support for a wide range of GPUs ranging from the Nvidia GTX 1060 all the way up to the super beefy Titan V. The 1060 can notably be found for as little as £200 and its price is expected to drop even further. Read More >>

gaming
All the Detail About Stadia, Google’s Huge Bet on the Future of Gaming

Google is taking on the big guys. In a keynote at Game Developers Conference in San Francisco today Google announced a new service, Stadia, that will allow gamers to play the biggest games on any Android or Chrome-based device (including any device with a Chrome browser). Read More >>

gaming
This 65-Inch PC Gaming Monitor Burned My Eyes in the Good Way

You’ve sat too close to the TV. Or to the screen at the cinema. Everything warps when you get up close. People become giants. The screen seems to go on forever. Everything takes on that 8-bit video game look as you can see the sharp outline of each pixel. But have you ever sat too close to a computer monitor? Can you remember a time you put your nose to that screen and felt like it was too close—too much? If you answer is “no,” might I interest you in the HP Omen X Emperium 65? It’s 65 beautiful inches of display that HP thinks gamers will happily drop £3,500 for. It is at once far, far too much screen for a mere computer, and it is gluttonously just enough. Read More >>

laptops
Dell XPS 13 Review: This Time It’s Practically Perfect

The Dell XPS 13 has been so dangerously close to perfect for so long that the latest iteration left me a little surprised. I was turning it this way and that to find something I could fault it for, not because I wanted to unfairly ding the product, it’s just that nothing is perfect. But Dell has so refined this version of its best 13-inch laptop that the issues with it are all minute and deeply personal. This is a near perfect laptop. Read More >>

augmented reality
You Are Not Ready For HoloLens 2

Microsoft figured it out. Tuesday I got my first opportunity to try out the HoloLens 2, and after slipping it over my head and taking a quick moment to calibrate the eye tracking, I was instantly able to move around the room and interact with objects crafted from light. It was annoyingly natural to participate in an AR world. I saw a helicopter floating over the very real sofa, and when I reached for it, the invisible box it was contained in glowed revealing edges I could simply drag and stretch to make the helicopter larger or smaller. With a pinch and a swish, it twirled around. There was nothing on my hands. No special glove or controller. The HoloLens 2 tracked my fingers and knew exactly what to do. It was a perfect interaction. And in the same short amount of time, it became clear that the average person isn’t getting HoloLens any time soon. Read More >>

gaming
Nintendo Does VR Now, Again

The Nintendo Switch already felt like the best part of a VR experience thanks to the wizardry of the Joy-Con controllers in some games, but now it’s going full VR. Tonight the company announced the Nintendo Labo: VR Kit, an $80 (UK price TBA) Labo kit that lets users build a VR headset out of cardboard. This is the first major foray into VR for the company since the 1995 Virtual Boy. Read More >>

apple
Apple May Finally Add Sleep Tracking to the Apple Watch, Still No Word on Better Battery Life

We’re up to the fourth iteration of Apple’s wearable, and the thing still can’t natively track my sleep. The Fitbit has been doing that almost from the beginning, and Apple has looked a little silly for lacking the feature. However, Bloomberg is reporting that Apple’s finally started testing sleep tracking, and it could appear on an Apple Watch as soon as soon as 2020. Read More >>