history
The Butchering Art: Victorian Medicine, From Blood-Caked Aprons and Body Snatching, to Antiseptic

“Ticketed spectators watched anatomists slice into the distended bellies of decomposing corpses, parts gushing forth not only human blood but also fetid pus. The lilting but incongruous notes of a flute sometimes accompanied the macabre demonstration. Public dissections were theatrical performances,” writes Dr. Lindsey Fitzharris in her new book The Butchering Art, available October 17th. The science and medical historian chronicles the gruesome horrors of an era before antisepsis—when speed was prized over precision—and the pioneering discoveries of Joseph Lister, known as the “father of modern surgery.” Lister’s antiseptic methods meant that injuries like a compound fracture no longer called for amputation. Read More >>

giz asks
Is Playing an Evil Clown Harmful to Your Mental Health?

With their fanciful costumes and comedic personas, clowns seem like the epitome of joy. But these figures of fun also provoke a horrified response and have even inspired their own phobia. Although it’s not officially recognised in the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-5 categorisation of disorders, coulrophobia, the fear of clowns, is one of the most commonly known phobias in the public perception. It’s easy to see why clowns are sometimes viewed as icons of fear. Permanent, frozen smiles and uncanny, mask-like makeup inspire nightmarish visions. Read More >>

giz asks
Is Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity a Real Illness?

The National Radio Quiet Zone (NRQZ) is a 13,000–square-mile area in West Virginia, Virginia, and part of Maryland that heavily restricts radio transmissions and other electromagnetic radiation on the same spectrum. Since 1958, the ban minimises interference with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, home to the world’s largest fully steerable radio telescope. Read More >>