science
World’s Oldest Cheese, Found in Ancient Tomb, Was Also Very Dangerous

Humans have been producing and consuming cheese for a very long time, as the recent discovery of 3,200-year-old cheese in an ancient Egyptian tomb attests. Delicious though this cheese may have been, it was also a potential source of disease. Read More >>

science
Section of U.S. Warship From WWII Discovered Off Alaskan Coast

In August 1943, the USS Abner Read struck a Japanese naval mine while conducting patrols in the Bering Sea. The explosion sheared the ship’s entire stern section, sending it and 71 U.S. sailors to the bottom of the Bering Sea. Lost for 75 years, the World War II destroyer’s severed stern has finally been found off a remote Alaskan island. Read More >>

science
Beetle Trapped in 99-Million-Year-Old Amber Was an Early Pollinator 

Amber fossils containing bugs are nothing new, but the discovery of a beautifully preserved Cretaceous Period beetle with bits of pollen still around it is changing what we know about the planet’s earliest pollinating insects. Read More >>

space
Hey Artists, Stop Putting Shiny Crap Into Space

As if there isn’t already enough junk in space, an artist is planning to launch a reflective, inflatable sculpture to low Earth orbit in October. The art piece is meant to instil a sense of wonder and alter humanity’s impression of itself, but in reality it’s an empty gesture that’ll only serve to infuriate astronomers. Read More >>

science
Ancient Egyptians Mastered Mummification Long Before the Time of Pharaohs

The earliest mummies are typically associated with the Old Kingdom of ancient Egypt, but as an intensive examination of a 5,600-year-old mummy confirms, the methods used for this iconic funeral practice date back to well before the age of pharaohs. Read More >>

robots
Robot Peer Pressure Is the Newest Tech Threat to Children

New research shows that children are more likely than adults to give in to peer pressure from robots, a disturbing finding given the rapidly increasing rate at which kids are interacting with socially intelligent machines. Read More >>

science
Diseased Ocean Microbes Could Be Messing With the Weather

Our oceans are brimming with microscopic phytoplankton—plant-like organisms that contribute significantly to marine diversity. Tiny though they are, these sea critters, when infected with a particular virus, may influence atmospheric processes such as cloud formation, according to new research. Read More >>

space
Earth’s Undetected ‘Mini-Moons’ Could Make for Exciting New Astronomy 

Every once in a while, our planet captures a “mini-moon,” a tiny asteroid that hangs out in our orbit for a bit before venturing back into the depths of space. New research suggests these small, temporary natural satellites carry tremendous scientific and commercial opportunities — but the trick will be in finding them. Read More >>

science
Humans May Have Reached North America by More Than One Route

There’s an ongoing debate among archaeologists as to which route the first settlers of North America took to reach the continent. Some say these migrants travelled along an interior passage between two massive ice sheets, while others say they traversed along a coastal route. New research suggests both interpretations are correct, and that multiple pathways into North America existed by the end of the last Ice Age. Read More >>

science
‘Dormant’ Supervolcano Packed With 240 Cubic Miles of Magma

It’s been around 100,000 years since the Long Valley supervolcano in the US state of California experienced a major eruption, but this supposedly dormant caldera has been acting a bit strangely over the past four decades. New research suggests 240 cubic miles of magma still exists within this supervolcano, but thankfully, a major eruption remains unlikely. Read More >>

science
New Evidence Contradicts Theory That Easter Island Society Collapsed

The indigenous people of Easter Island, the Rapa Nui, experienced a societal collapse after the 17th century because they stripped the island clean of its natural resources. Or at least, that’s the leading theory. An analysis of the tools used by the Rapa Nui to build their iconic stone statues suggests a very different conclusion, pointing to the presence of a highly organised and cohesive society. Read More >>

animals
Black Widow Spiders Are Spreading Farther North Through the US than Ever Before

Using photos snapped by citizen scientists, Canadian researchers have documented the northerly spread of black widows into regions not typically known to host these spiders, whose bites can cause severe pain. Read More >>

science
An Ailing Orca Was Given Medication in the Wild for the First Time Ever

A team of biologists from NOAA Fisheries, Vancouver Aquarium, and other institutions have been tracking the three-year-old orca, named J50, or Scarlet, for weeks. They’re not entirely sure what’s wrong with her, but she’s dangerously underweight and often lethargic. Scarlet is a member of the J-Pod, a group of about 76 critically endangered southern resident orcas, or killer whales. Maintaining the life of each pod member, females especially, is crucially important, hence the extraordinary and unprecedented measure to administer medication. Read More >>

space
Why This Star-Packed Region of Space Is Likely Devoid of Life

Globular clusters are among the most fascinating celestial phenomena in the galaxy, packing a hideous amount of stars into a relatively tiny region of space. Given the sheer number and variety of stars within these clusters, it seems reasonable to think they’d also be packed with life. But as new research suggests, globular clusters are likely cosmic-scale wastelands. Read More >>

science
The World’s Fastest Creature Is Not What You Think

When it comes to naming the world’s fastest creature, it’s tempting to think of peregrine falcons, cheetahs, or marlins, but as researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology are apt to point out, we mustn’t forget Spirostomum ambiguum – a worm-like creature that reaches breakneck speeds through rapid shrinkage. Read More >>