health
Two-Thirds of All Cancer Mutations Are ‘Unavoidable,’ Scientists Claim

In a study that’s bound to attract considerable controversy, a pair of researchers are claiming that between 60 and 66 per cent of all cancer-causing mutations are the result of random DNA copying errors, making them essentially unavoidable. The new research is offering important insights into how cancer emerges, and how it should be diagnosed and treated—but many questions remain. Read More >>

apple
A Four-Year-Old Boy Used Siri to Save His Unconscious Mother’s Life

When a young boy identified only as Roman couldn’t wake up his unconscious mother, he did what any astute, technologically-adept four-year-old would do: He used his mother’s finger to unlock her phone, and then asked Siri to call emergency services. The boy’s actions saved his mother, but the incident exposes some dark and dangerous flaws in our increasingly landline-less world. Read More >>

science
Insane Light System Blasts the Energy of 10,000 Suns

German scientists have constructed a powerful new light system that can focus energy equivalent to the radiation of 10,000 suns onto a single spot. Eventually, they hope, this “artificial sun” could be used to produce environmentally-friendly fuels. Read More >>

space
The Curiosity Rover’s Wheels Aren’t Looking So Good

A routine check performed by NASA has uncovered two tears on the treads of the Mars Curiosity Rover’s left middle wheel. The damage isn’t unexpected, nor is it catastrophic, but it’s a reminder that this intrepid little explorer won’t last forever. Read More >>

neuroscience
The Brains of Blind People Really Are Wired to Enhance Other Senses

It’s often said that the loss of one sense improves the others. New research shows the dramatic extent to which this is true in blind people, and how their brains make new connections to boost hearing, smell, touch — and even cognitive functions such as memory and language. Read More >>

science
The Haunting Face of a Man Who Lived 700 Years Ago

This may look like a photograph, but the highly realistic face staring back at you belongs to a man who died over 700 years ago. The researchers who performed this unbelievable facial reconstruction say their work is providing new details about the way ordinary people lived in medieval England. Read More >>

weird animals
Why Scientists Think This Silly Bird Can’t Stop Looking at Its Reflection

We all like to admire ourselves in the mirror from time to time, but there’s a bird in Australia that seems to have developed a rather unhealthy fixation, gazing upon its reflection for hours on end while seemingly oblivious to its surroundings. It’s pretty funny, but should we be worried about this fine feathered fellow? Read More >>

space
Europe’s First Spacecraft to Jupiter Will Be Taking a Crazy Route

They say the shortest distance between two points is a straight line, but for JUICE—a European Space Agency-led, Jupiter-bound probe scheduled to launch in 2022—the quickest route will involve a rather convoluted journey requiring four gravitational assists with three different planets. Read More >>

tardigrades
The Incredible Way Tardigrades Survive Total Dehydration

Tardigrades, also known as “water bears”, are probably the toughest microscopic creatures on the planet, capable of surviving freezing, radiation, and even the vacuum of space. They’re also able to withstand complete dehydration—and scientists have finally figured out how they do it. Read More >>

science
What the Hell is Going On With This Eyeball?

A 37-year-old woman recently went to her eye doctor complaining of itching and watering eyes. While taking a close look, the doctor saw this freaky sight staring back. Read More >>

science
An Odour Sensor on Malaria Mosquitoes Specifically Targets Human Stench

Researchers at Vanderbilt University have found a secondary set of odour sensors on female malarial mosquitoes that appear to be specifically tuned to sniff out humans. While admittedly disturbing, the discovery could lead to new ways of combating malarial mosquitoes and the dreaded disease they carry. Read More >>

space
Canada is Finally Getting Its First Spaceport

Halifax-based Maritime Launch Services has confirmed its plans to build a $148-million rocket spaceport near Canso, Nova Scotia. Scheduled for completion in 2020, it’ll be Canada’s first and only site where rockets can be launched into orbit. Read More >>

snakes
The Deadliest Cobras Also Look the Most Terrifying

Cobras are renowned for their devastating flesh-eating venom, and the dramatic way they rear their heads upwards to flare their hoods. New research clarifies the purpose of these tactics and how they emerged among cobras—insights that could help scientists develop more powerful anti-venoms, and help you spot an especially deadly cobra before it’s too late. Read More >>

science
Peer Into the Guts of a Monster Tornado With This Incredible Simulation

Using a powerful supercomputer, meteorologists have simulated the “El Reno” tornado—a category 5 storm that swept through Oklahoma on May 24, 2011. Read More >>

animals
Zoos Are So Afraid of Poachers They’re Starting to Cut the Horns Off Their Rhinos

A Czech zoo has decided to remove the horns of 18 white rhinos after a deadly attack last week at a French zoo where poachers shot a rhino and used a chainsaw to cut off its horns. Welcome to the new normal, where even zoo animals have to be mutilated to protect them from poaching. Read More >>