drugs
The Psychedelic Drug DMT Can Simulate a Near-Death Experience, Study Suggests

Not everyone who is close to death—or thinks they are, at least—has a “near-death experience.” But those who do often hallucinate that they leave their bodies, meet otherworldly beings, see bright flashes and tunnels of light, and more. Those who take the psychedelic drug dimethyltryptamine, or DMT— a compound found in the hallucinogenic Amazonian brew known as ayahuasca—experience many of the same things. Read More >>

animals
The Asteroid That Killed The Dinosaurs Also Jumbled Shark Evolution

More than 500 different shark species roam Earth’s oceans: from zippy little cookie-cutter sharks, to the iconic great white, to nightmarish goblin sharks, to 25-foot-long, filter-feeding basking sharks. And it seems that the current equilibrium of shark species we see today arose after the Cretaceous–Paleogene mass extinction event 66 million years ago, according to new research. Read More >>

uncategorized
Scientists Just Measured the Drought that May Have Brought Down the Ancient Maya

The ancient Maya were an innovative people. They constructed intricate cities throughout the tropical lowlands of the Yucatán Peninsula, communicated using one of the world’s first written languages, and created two calendar systems by studying the stars. But despite their achievements, the thriving Mayan civilisation mysteriously collapsed sometime between the eighth and ninth centuries. We still don’t know exactly why. Read More >>

animals
The World’s Largest King Penguin Colony Is Catastrophically Shrinking—and We Don’t Know Why

The last time scientists visited Ile aux Cochons in 1982, an island that is part of an archipelago in the southern Indian Ocean, the king penguin population was booming. Over 500,000 breeding pairs (around 2 million penguins total) huddled together there, making the island the largest king penguin colony in the world. But new research shows their numbers have been on a stiff decline since then—by as much as 88 per cent. And scientists don’t really know why. Read More >>

dinosaurs
Giant Dinosaur Foot Identified 20 Years After Being Unearthed

The Black Hills mountain range in the US, which stretches from South Dakota to Wyoming, is known for its lush forests, scenic waterfalls, and dense, intricate cave systems. But 150 million years ago, humongous, long-necked dinosaurs called sauropods roamed there – and scientists just identified one of their colossal, fossilised feet. Read More >>

health
What Is Fungal Acne and Why Do So Many People Suddenly Think They Have It?

Have you ever had a breakout that wouldn’t go away for weeks, maybe even months, no matter which products you threw at it? Did it consist of a lot of small bumps? Was it a little itchy? Read More >>

science
New ‘Amazing Dragon’ Dinosaur Species Discovered in China

The gigantic, long-necked sauropods are an iconic group of dinosaurs—and it seems scientists have just discovered a new one. Palaeontologists were able to define the new species, known as Lingwulong shenqi, using seven to 10 partial skeletons from four separate dig sites in China. Read More >>

science
Why Your SPF 15 Sunscreen Probably Isn’t Enough to Protect You From the Sun

Are you always careful to apply sunscreen before a day outdoors, but find yourself getting burned anyway? It might be due to your application technique. Dermatologists say that most people don’t put on a thick enough layer sunscreen, and new research – in which scientists put varying amounts of sunscreen on volunteers’ butts – shows how those thin applications of sunscreen fail to provide the SPF listed on the bottle. Read More >>

space
Astronomers Found 10 New Moons Circling Jupiter

Scientists announced that they have discovered 10 previously unknown moons orbiting Jupiter. This brings the gaseous behemoth’s total moon count up to 79. Read More >>

animals
Horses Make This Funny Sound When They’re Happy

When horses are happy, they snort, according to new research published today in PLoS One. The finding could help improve treatment of these domesticated animals, the authors say. Read More >>

science
New Translucent Spider Discovered Living in Muddy Cave in America

Scientists have discovered a new species of sheet-weaving spider, and it only dwells in one cave in the US state of Indiana. As its name suggests, this spider spins flat, tightly-woven, horizontal webs. There are thousands of species of sheet-weavers, and you’ve probably walked through one of their webs by accident some point. Read More >>

science
Earth Has Many More Rivers and Streams Than We Thought, New Satellite Study Finds

Rivers and streams cover much more of the planet than geologists previously estimated, according to a new study published in Science. In total, this new estimate shows that, excluding land with glaciers, Earth is covered by just under 300,000 square miles (773,000 square kilometres) of rivers and streams. That’s more square footage than the state of Texas, and it’s as much as 44 percent higher than previous counts. Read More >>

science
Origin Mystery of Ancient Rhino-Like Mammal Solved By 55-Million-Year-Old Fossil

Tens of millions of years ago, after most land-roaming dinosaurs died out in the Cretaceous Period, a hodgepodge of ancient animals started to fill the landscapes the dinos left behind. One such group was the embrithopods: hoofed mammals, now extinct, whose name means “heavy-footed.” Read More >>

archaeology
Extinct Gibbon Species Found in Tomb of Ancient Chinese Noblewoman

A certain Chinese noblewoman — potentially Lady Xia, grandmother to the first emperor of China — had a menagerie buried with her in her tomb: a leopard, a crane, an asiatic black bear, a lynx, and, most notably, a gibbon. That gibbon was part of newly identified, now-extinct genus and species, researchers reported Thursday. The existence of a previously unknown gibbon that lived just 2,200 years ago suggests that throughout history, humans may have caused even more ape extinctions than we thought. Read More >>