hacking
There Are ‘Thousands’ of Bugs Making Pacemakers Vulnerable to Hackers

The more of our lives are wired, the more they become vulnerable to things like software glitches and hackers. That includes pieces of technology we put in our bodies — recently, it’s become clear that vital medical devices like insulin pumps and pacemakers possess the same vulnerabilities as those ill-advised connected tea kettles. Read More >>

microsoft
Microsoft Reportedly Wants to Use DNA for Cloud Data Storage

In the not-so-distant future, next time you want to back up your work to Microsoft’s cloud, you might be storing it on a few snippets of DNA. Read More >>

science
A ‘Superbug’ Fungus Is Spreading Across the US

Over the past nine months, the number of US cases of an emerging, multi-drug resistant fungus has ballooned from 7 to more than 122. What’s more, the fungus, Candida auris, seems to be spreading, according to a field report the Centers for Disease Control released Thursday. Read More >>

science
A Controversial Ebola Vaccine May Get Its First Real World Test in Congo

In December, the headlines were euphoric: After a deadly West African Ebola epidemic two years ago, scientists had not only developed a vaccine, but it appeared to be 100 percent effective. That effectiveness was quickly disputed—but now, as a new Ebola outbreak is rattling the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the vaccine may finally get a crucial real world test. Read More >>

science
The Body is Not a Computer – Stop Thinking of It as One

When former DARPA chief Regina Dugan announced on stage last month that Facebook planned to build a brain computer interface to allow users to send their thoughts directly to the social network without a keyboard intermediary, it had all the Silicon Valley swagger of Facebook circa “move fast and break things.” With the same audacity that any other Facebook product might be announced, Dugan explained that the company hopes to have this revolutionary brain-hack ready to ship “within a few years.” Read More >>

science
How Smart Watches Might Actually Improve Your Health

If you sacrifice style to strap a clunky Apple Watch or Fitbit to your wrist, one of the tradeoffs is supposedly the ability to better monitor your health. But so far, the health benefits of tracking your step count or heart rate are mostly unproven. In fact, some research has suggested the benefits are actually nil. Read More >>

science
This Synthetic Bone Implant Could Replace Painful Marrow Transplants

Thanks to advances in medicine, bone marrow transplants are no longer the last resorts they one were. Every year, thousands of marrow transplants are performed, a common treatment for ailments from bone marrow disease to leukemia. But because they first require a patient undergo radiation to kill off any existing bone marrow stem cells, marrow transplants remain incredibly hard on a patient. Read More >>

science
CRISPR Could Transform the Way We Diagnose Disease

The gene editing tool CRISPR could one day mean that we can simply edit away disease, blight and undesirable genetic traits. Now, it’s also gaining traction in another realm of medical technology: diagnosing disease. Read More >>

cars
How Will Companies Convince Us That Self-Driving Cars Aren’t Death Traps?

Since we’re all friends here on the internet, I’ll let you in on a little secret: I hate driving. I drive too slowly, lurch violently when I change lanes, and the thought of having to merge onto a speeding California highway makes my heart speed up a little even as I write this. I’m no good at driving and never have been. Read More >>

science
China Is Racing Ahead in the Quest to Cure Cancer With CRISPR

On Friday, a team of Chinese scientists used the cutting-edge gene-editing technique CRISPR-Cas9 on humans for the second time in history, injecting a cancer patient with modified human genes in hopes of vanquishing the disease. Read More >>

science
Leaked Documents Reveal the NSA Spying on Scientists to Find ‘Nefarious’ Genetic Research

A new document made public this week via Edward Snowden’s leak of NSA documents reveals a fascinating aim of signals intelligence programme: The agency, it turns out, monitored international scientific developments in hopes of detecting “nefarious” genetic engineering projects more than a decade ago. Read More >>

science
Facebook Literally Wants to Read Your Thoughts

At Facebook’s annual developer conference, F8, on Wednesday, the group unveiled what may be Facebook’s most ambitious—and creepiest—proposal yet. Facebook wants to build its own “brain-to-computer interface” that would allow us to send thoughts straight to a computer. Read More >>

science
Do Parents Have a Right to Sue Over Their Kids’ Genetics?

It’s a nightmare scenario straight out of a primetime drama: a child-seeking couple visits a fertility clinic to try their luck with in-vitro fertilisation, only to wind up accidentally impregnated by the wrong sperm. Read More >>

science
A New Flavour of CRISPR Could Tackle Some of the Worst Genetic Diseases

Cardiomyocytes from patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy corrected by CRISPR-Cpf1. Image: Science Advances
Read More >>

science
New Zealand Could Use Gene Editing to Kill Off Its Cutest Predator

The stoat—a small, adorable, weasel-like mammal—is the one of the largest ecological threats in New Zealand. It’s a fierce invader with few predators that dines freely on the country’s endangered birds. The stoat did not come to New Zealand via any unfortunate accident. It was brought there on purpose, introduced in the 19th century to control another pest introduced by settlers, the rabbit. It was, in essence, a Russian nesting doll of ecological disasters—one bad decision supplanting yet another.
Read More >>