science
If You Transplant a Human Head, Where Do You Get the Body?

Two years ago, the controversial Italian neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero made a brazen announcement: In December 2017, for the first time in history, he would transplant a human head. Read More >>

science
Scientist Sleuths Used DNA to Track Spread of Superbug

When an outbreak occurs, in order to effectively figure out how to stop it, researchers typically try to figure out how it started. The answer to that question, though, can be elusive. And as so-called superbug infections have spread across hospitals, scientists and public health officials have subsequently struggled to understand how these pathogens spread. Read More >>

science
Could the Personalised Medicine Revolution Actually Slow Innovation? 

The promise of personalised medicine is a pretty big one: tailoring treatments to a patient’s genes, their environment or their lifestyle, the thinking goes, will result in treatments that are much more likely to work. The same disease can manifest differently in different people, so why treat patients with a one-size-fits-all-approach? Read More >>

science
This Outdated Law Makes CRISPR Illegal in Canada—and That’s Hurting Science

Canada is among the few countries in the world where genetically engineering human embryos isn’t just illegal, doing so could land you behind bars. Read More >>

crispr
Could the Whole CRISPR Patent Kerfuffle Have Been Completely Avoided?

For the better part of the last three years, the introduction of the most powerful gene editing technology ever invented has been marred by a nasty patent battle. The two groups of scientists involved, each contributing significantly to the future of genetic engineering, are pitted against each other in a bitter contest for glory and fortune. Read More >>

science
Genetically Engineering the Natural World, it Turns Out, Could Be a Disaster 

For the native species of New Zealand, European settlement was particularly cruel. The country has no endemic land predators, so many of its birds evolved without the typical avian aptitude for flight. Then came Western settlers, and along with them rats, mice, opossums, stoats, cats, and the occasional misbehaving dog. For these invaders, New Zealand’s flightless birds were a veritable feast. Numbers dwindled. Despite conservation efforts, the country still loses about 20 of its namesake kiwi birds every week. Read More >>

science
In a Major First, Scientists Edit DNA Within the Human Body

For the first time in history, scientists have edited the DNA inside of a patient’s body, in an attempt to cure a genetic disorder by permanently changing the human genome. The news, reported Wednesday by the Associated Press, represents a major landmark in science. Read More >>

apple
The Apple Watch Can Accurately Detect Hypertension and Sleep Apnoea

The data that fitness trackers collect about your body goes far beyond just how many steps you’ve taken, and researchers are just beginning to understand how to harness all that valuable data-collecting power. Read More >>

science
Stunning Video Is the First to Show CRISPR Editing DNA in Real Time

Despite sounding like an off-brand breakfast cereal, the genetic engineering technique CRISPR has infiltrated the vocabulary of the general public, stoking fierce ethics debates, imaginative renderings of the future and even inspiring a novel and a J.Lo-backed TV series. That’s because CRISPR truly is amazing, allowing human beings to alter genetic code with a level of precision never before achieved. And now there’s actual video footage documenting just how amazing CRISPR really is. Read More >>

science
New Brain Technologies Could Lead to Terrifying Invasions of Privacy, Warn Scientists

Imagine for a minute that you survive a terrible accident, and lose function of your right arm. You receive a brain implant able to interpret your brain’s neural activity and reroute commands to a robotic arm. Then one day, someone hacks that chip, sending malicious commands to the robotic arm. It’s a biological invasion of privacy in which you are suddenly no longer in control. Read More >>

science
‘Major Biomedical Triumph’ as Scientists Restore Seven-Year-Old Boy’s Skin

Junctional epidermolysis bullosa is the sort of rare disease you are probably lucky to have never heard of. An often lethal genetic condition, from infancy it plagues its victim with painful blisters all over the body that causes the skin to become extremely fragile. Read More >>

science
The EPA Just Approved Lab-Grown Mosquitoes to Fight Disease

Killer mosquitoes are coming — mosquitoes that help kill other mosquitoes, that is. Read More >>

health
The FDA is Cracking Down on Claims That Weed Cures Cancer

In the US, so far 29 states and DC have legalised medical marijuana, as modern research has suggested that weed can help treat conditions like chronic pain and the side effects of chemotherapy. Some companies, though, are abusing the growing acceptance of weed for medicinal purposes. On Wednesday, the FDA reported that it has sent warning letters to four companies claiming that marijuana-based products can treat or cure cancer. Read More >>

science
Startup Under Scrutiny for Selling Genetic Tests Without Legal Certification

When a consumer genetic testing company planned to give away free DNA tests to Baltimore Ravens fans in September, the federal government intervened and prompted a last-minute cancellation. Now, a federal agency has found that the startup, Orig3n, does not have the necessary legal certification to sell genetic tests related to health. Read More >>

science
The Fascinating Link Between Gut Health and Cancer Treatment

Why do some therapies work wonders on some patients, but seem to have virtually no effect on others? Two fascinating new studies in Science shed light on one potential contributing factor in treatment outcome for cancer patients: The trillions of microrganisms that live in our guts. Read More >>