science
The All-Women Team of Scientists That Trekked to the Heart of Kilauea Volcano’s Eruption 

As the eruption at Kilauea volcano turned the southeastern corner of Hawaii’s Big Island into a river of lava this summer, residents and tourists were instructed to stay the hell away. An all-women team of scientists from Britain, however, was asked to do the exact opposite. Read More >>

animals
Why More Hungry Polar Bears Could Start Devouring Dead Whales

Just over a year ago, more than 150 polar bears amassed on a remote island off the north coast Siberia to devour a dead bowhead whale that had washed ashore. It was the largest swarm of polar bears ever recorded feasting on a stranded whale—but events like this could become more common in a warmer world. Read More >>

environment
Geyser Eruption at Yellowstone Unleashes ‘Clearly Historic’ Collection of Human Garbage

Geyser eruptions at America's Yellowstone National Park are moments of rarefied beauty; spectacular reminders that we live on a geologically-dynamic planet. A recent eruption was also a reminder that we’ve turned said planet into a dumpster. Read More >>

science
Mass Die-Off of Orcas Feared Due to Chemicals Banned in the ’70s

A group of industrial chemicals humans started banning decades ago could cause many of the world’s orca whale populations to collapse over the next century, an alarming new study has found. Read More >>

energy
Clean Energy Boom Could Fuel One of the World’s Dirtiest Industries

The irony of transitioning to clean energy is we’re going to have to mine the shit out of the Earth to do it. Much like our computers and smartphones, wind turbines and solar panels are high-tech devices whose production demands a smattering of metals and minerals from across the periodic table and the planet. Read More >>

environment
Watch a Russian Ice Cap Experience An ‘Unprecedented’ Melt Down

It’s no secret that ice around the world is receding as global temperatures rise. Even so, the sudden destabilisation of a remote ice cap in the Russian High Arctic has scientists throwing around words like “extraordinary” and “unprecedented.” Read More >>

science
Glacier Named After Prominent Geologist Renamed Following Sexual Harassment Scandal

The Me Too movement has toppled Hollywood executives, pundits, and bureaucrats since it burst onto the scene last year. Prompting a government agency to rename a geologic landform, however, may be a first. Read More >>

animals
Three Freaky New Fish Species Discovered in One of the World’s Deepest Trenches

In further proof that the deep sea is stranger than outer space, scientists have discovered what they believe to be three new species of snailfish nearly 25,000 feet (7,500 meters) below the ocean’s surface in the Atacama Trench. The translucent, scaleless creatures look like ghosts that accidentally entered our world through some kind of rift in the spacetime continuum. Read More >>

science
New Super-High-Resolution Map Shows Antarctica In Unprecedented Detail

We’ve seen a lot of good maps of Earth’s polar regions of late. A map that shows the thickness of the entire Antarctic ice sheet. Another that shows Greenland’s hidden bedrock contours in unprecedented detail. But a new terrain map of Antarctica is still special. It’s not just the highest resolution ever produced for the frozen continent, but the highest resolution for any continent, full stop. Read More >>

environment
NASA’s New Space Laser Will Track Earth’s Vanishing Ice

On September 15, NASA will launch a laser 310 miles above the Earth to scan our planet’s ice sheets like never before, recording changes in the elevation of these frozen landscapes down to the width of a pencil. Read More >>

science
Giant Antarctic Iceberg Makes Dramatic Rotation

Since it snapped off the Larsen C ice shelf in July 2017, the trillion-ton iceberg known as A68 has spent most of its time stuck in the mud. Now, new satellite data reveals that the ‘berg made its biggest move yet over the austral winter – a dramatic counterclockwise rotation that shows no signs of stopping. Read More >>

climate change
As the World Burns, There Will Be Fewer Firefighters to Share

As out-of-control wildfires raged across the Western US, American firefighting authorities took a seemingly unusual step late last month: they called up Australia and New Zealand and asked for help. Read More >>

environment
Australia Is Bracing for an ‘Insane Fire Season’

Since early August — wintertime in the southern hemisphere — hundreds of bushfires have flared up in the Australian provinces of Queensland and New South Wales, prompting some local authorities to declare bushfire season open more than a month ahead of schedule. This freak fire lashing has experts extremely worried for what lies ahead as Australia transitions into spring and then summer. Read More >>

science
The Wacky, Risky World of DIY Submarines

When marine scientist Shanee Stopnitzky learned that police had hauled her stolen yellow sub out of San Francisco Bay and taken it to an impound lot, she was relieved. Not for the vehicle, but for whoever took it for a joy ride. Read More >>