science
New Climate Study Doesn’t Contradict Global Warming, No Matter What Breitbart Says

The science news media has a pretty simple job: Find facts, and report them. Typically, this entails reading a scientific study, talking to the study’s authors and outside experts, writing, and fact-checking the confusing bits with experts again. But sometimes, the narrative the media wants isn’t actually supported by the study, or the experts. Such is the case with a new paper on climate change. Read More >>

climate change
As Alaska Thaws, Everything Changes

Bitter winters still dominate life in the Alaskan interior, but a practiced eye can spot the signs of a warming climate, particularly in the ground. Beneath the rolling fields of tussock scattered just north of the Alaska Range, what was once permanently frozen is starting to thaw. The impacts could ripple across the planet. Read More >>

climate change
More Evidence That Pink Snow Will Be a Problem for the Planet

Last year, a team of European researchers was alarmed to learn that glaciers covered in pink snow—caused not by an Ocean Spray truck collision, but by snow-dwelling red algae—were melting faster than the surrounding white ice. Now, another group of researchers has observed the same phenomenon halfway across the world in Alaska. Pink snow really is a problem for Earth’s glaciers, and it could get a lot worse in the future. Read More >>

space
Cassini Is Gone and I’m Not Crying You’re Crying

After a 20-year sojourn in the final frontier, at approximately 1 PM GMT today, NASA’s Jet Propulsion laboratory lost contact with the Cassini spacecraft, which had plunged into Saturn’s atmosphere about an hour and a half prior, ending its 13-year exploration of the Saturn system. Read More >>

environment
240-Year-Old Nautical Maps Reveal How Different Florida’s Coral Reefs Used to Be

Old sailor’s tales about the seas being so full of fish you could walk on them, or oysters the size of frisbees, tend to inspire scepticism today, and for good reason—most of us have very little direct experience with the oceans, except for the occasional news article about how we’ve screwed it up beyond repair. But the oceans of yesteryear really were more plentiful than they are today, and a new analysis of 240-year-old nautical charts hints at just how dramatically things have changed. Read More >>

meteorology
How Hurricane Irma Became Such a Monster

Meteorologists were at a loss for words yesterday as Hurricane Irma intensified into a enormous, record-smashing Category 5. Packing “catastrophic” and “life-threatening” winds of 185 miles per hour (300 km/h), the storm now bearing down on Puerto Rico and the US Virgin islands is officially the strongest Atlantic hurricane ever recorded north of the Caribbean and east of Florida. But how did it get to be such a monster? Read More >>

science
Why Are Sea Levels Around Miami Rising So Much Faster Than Other Places?

In Miami, it’s no secret that flooding is occurring more often, nor that rising sea levels and climate change are to blame. But, as is often the case when you drill down into the inner workings of our planet, the full story is a bit more complicated. Read More >>

space
There May Be Four Rocky Planets Around the Nearest Sun-Like Star

Mildly encouraging news for Earthlings hoping to escape the scorched ruins of our own planet: a team of astronomers has found evidence for four Earth-sized (ish) worlds orbiting tau Ceti, a Sun-like star located just 12 light years away. Two of these planets, the researchers say, might barely be on the edge of the habitable zone, that not-too-hot, not-too-cold region that can potentially support liquid water and even life. Read More >>

environment
There’s a Freakishly Large Fire Blazing Across Western Greenland

Scientists have spotted a large wildfire raging across western Greenland, a place better known for its enormous glaciers than for terrain-destroying blazes. Read More >>

animals
Disembodied Anus-Eye Terrorized Ancient Earth’s Oceans

Earth’s ancient oceans were rife with nightmare creatures, from many-limbed worms to six-foot-long crab-ancestors. This week, scientists are taking the prehistoric freak show to another level, with a new paper introducing Capinatator praetermissus: the 500-million-year-old bristled-jawed worm monster pictured above. Read More >>

space
An ‘Extremely Surprising’ Storm System Just Appeared Over Neptune

Do not be alarmed, but a bright storm system three quarters the width of our entire planet has emerged over Neptune’s equator, in a region where no bright clouds have ever been witnessed before. Read More >>

science
Antarctica’s Massive Iceberg Has Become a Major Scientific Experiment

Last month, humanity watched with a mixture of awe and terror as an iceberg half the size of Jamaica broke clean off the Antarctic Peninsula. But the story isn’t over for Larsen C, or its recently-shed belly fat, the iceberg now known as A68. As both iceberg and shelf continue to transform before our eyes, they’re proving to be a scientific goldmine for researchers. Read More >>

space
Four Breathtaking Solar Eclipses You Can See From Other Planets

On August 21st, millions of Earthlings will gather to watch as a total solar eclipse sweeps across the centreline of the United States over the course of 90 minutes. For many, it’ll be once-in-a-life-time spectacle. But if you had a spacecraft on hand, you wouldn’t need to wait decades for the next total solar eclipse to arrive at a town near you—you could simply jet off to Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, or even Pluto. That’s because there’s a veritable zoo of solar eclipses occurring all across our solar system, all the time. Read More >>

science
We’re Not Totally Sure How Much the Planet Will Warm This Century – But We Still Need to Act

It’s a well-worn fact that our round Earth is warming, and that human carbon emissions are the cause. What’s less well-known is how much warming we’ve already committed our planet to in the future. A new study crunched some numbers and came to an alarming answer—but other experts are already criticising its approach, reminding us that the course of climate change remains incredibly tough to predict. Read More >>

astronomy
Molecules That Could Form ‘Cell-Like’ Membranes Spotted on Saturn’s Largest Moon

Saturn’s moon Titan is a world of contrast; both eerily familiar and strikingly alien. Its calm seas and enormous sand dunes might remind you of Earth, until you learn that what’s flowing across Titan’s surface is not water, but liquid hydrocarbons. Titan’s nitrogen-rich atmosphere seems to have some of the ingredients for biology, but any life forms evolved to thrive at temperatures of -290 degrees Fahrenheit would be practically unrecognisable. Read More >>