science
Male Tortoises Mysteriously Stop Boning

There are only a few things in this life animals really have to do. They have to eat, they have to shit, and they have to bang. So when conservation biologists transplant a bunch of wild animals in order to save them, but half of them stop getting laid as a result, it’s cause for concern. Read More >>

environment
Australian Climate Expert Says Pain-in-the-Arse America Should Just Ditch the Paris Agreement Already

Sometimes, the only way to fix an unhappy relationship is to end it. Since former president Obama (remember that guy?) left office in January, the United States has done an about-face on the Paris climate agreement—they’ve gone from being an leader on climate action to a rogue state that can’t decide whether it wants to keep a seat at the international table. Read More >>

space
That ‘Alien Megastructure’ Star Is Freaking Out Again

It’s almost certainly not aliens, but once again, Tabby’s Star is acting hella weird. The star that first became our planetary obsession back in the fall of 2015—when astronomer Jason Wright suggested its weird flickering behaviour might be the result of an alien megastructure—is, once again, flickering. But unlike previous stellar glitches, astronomers are now prepared to study it in the act. Read More >>

science
Flat Earthers Won’t Believe This News on Antarctica’s Climate

The Arctic is the fastest-warming place on our overheated planet, but so far, its polar opposite has managed to stay pretty cool. Why is Antarctica warming so slowly compared with the Arctic? The answer is complicated, but a new study suggests we’re overlooking a basic reality of geometry. Read More >>

space
A New Look at Proxima b’s Potential Climate Offers Hope for Future Colonists

Ever since astronomers announced the discovery of an Earth-sized exoplanet less than five light years down the cosmic street, the question on every good space cadet’s mind has been whether or not we can colonise it. We’re not going to know if Proxima b is habitable until we can point some very powerful telescopes at it, which won’t happen until next year. But until then, scientists are playing around with models—and one such modelling effort recently came to some promising conclusions. Read More >>

science
How Much Force Could a T-rex Bite Deliver?

In the 1993 cult classic Jurassic Park, a T-rex manages to scare the living shit out of kid heroes Lex and Tim Murphy by casually ripping apart their Ford Explorer like it’s a scrap of meat. It’s a scene that crystallised the destructive power of this extinct apex predator in the public consciousness — and as a new study highlights, it might not have been that hyperbolic. Read More >>

science
How Does a 110-Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Still Have Its Skin?

An arresting image of a “mummified” dinosaur went viral this weekend after National Geographic broke the story of the 110-million-year-old armoured plant-eater, a newfound species of nodosaur whose exquisite remains are now on display in the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Alberta, Canada. Read More >>

space
The Amazing Hypothesis for Why the Trappist-1 System Hasn’t Destroyed Itself

When astronomers announced the discovery of seven Earth-sized planets orbiting the ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1, Earthlings immediately celebrated the possibility that one of those planetary neighbors could host life. But to physicists, TRAPPIST-1 presented a puzzle: How could those seven planets, all packed around a single star closer than Mercury orbits the Sun, survive? Why haven’t they all crashed into each other? Read More >>

locations
Antarctica’s ‘Dragon Skin’ Ice Is Incredible

Dragon skin ice sounds like something you’d encounter beyond The Wall in the Game of Thrones fantasy realm. But good news nerds, you can find this magical-sounding stuff right here on Earth—though you’ve got to be lucky, and willing to travel to some of the most hostile environments on the planet. Like the team of Antarctic scientists who came across vast expanses of the bizarre, scaly ice in the Ross Sea last week. Read More >>

science
Extremely Relatable Dragonfly Fakes Her Death to Deter Unwanted Males

It’s a scenario many women in the room are all too familiar with: You’re sitting in the park, enjoying some R&R, when you spy a leery Y-chromosome carrier lumbering your direction, clearly looking to test the pickup line he found on Imgur last night. You could run; you could start talking loudly and to no one in particular about your last menstrual cycle. Or, you could do as the female moorland hawker dragonfly does, and pretend to be dead. Read More >>

environment
Why the Scariest Response to Climate Change Is Finally Being Taken Seriously

We’re not doing such a great job solving the whole climate change problem, which is why some experts think it’s time to study more radical tactics. The notion of geoengineering—hacking the climate to cool the planet—is controversial, awe-inspiring, and to many, terrifying. And yet, despite their own grave concerns with the idea, a group of researchers believes the time has come to explore whether planet-hacking might really work. Read More >>

science
Baby Humpback Whales Whisper to Their Moms Because the Ocean Is Terrifying

The ocean is dark and full of terrors — including hungry orcas, and horny men looking to bang your mum, if you’re a baby humpback whale. And so, you keep your voice to a whisper to avoid these predatory eavesdroppers. Read More >>

science
We Just Found Out Antarctica Is Covered in Rivers

In 1908, Ernest Shackleton’s legendary Nimrod team was making its way toward the South Pole when the men were startled by something unexpected: the sound of liquid water, roaring across the frozen wasteland toward the sea. One hundred and nine years later, scientists can confirm that this sound, described by one early explorer as “odd after the usual Antarctic silence” was not a trick of the mens’ imaginations, nor was it a fluke. Hundreds of individual waterways gush across our planet’s ice-covered continent in the summertime, and they’ve been doing so for decades. Read More >>

science
Plants Are Gobbling Up Our Carbon Emissions, But Not Fast Enough

It’s one of the biggest mysteries in this global experiment we’re conducting by pouring 10 billion tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year: What’ll happen to the plants? Will the relentless burning of fossil fuels prompt our leafy green friends to suck down more CO2, tapping the brakes on climate change? Or are the trees unable to bail Earth’s atmosphere out this mess? Read More >>

space
Oh My God, Look at Saturn’s North Pole

Recently, Gizmodo space writer Rae Paoletta called Saturn “the golden retriever of the solar system,” and I’m not here to dispute that characterisation. But it was a lot easier to think of Saturn as a golden retriever when the planet’s defining hue was, y’know, gold. Not blue. Not electric, alien protomolecule-blue. Read More >>