climate change
Let’s All Take a Breath and Read That ‘Hothouse Earth’ Paper

If the past year of floods, fires, heat waves, and droughts are any indicator, climate change is going to be rough. But in case you weren’t already alarmed, a team of prominent climate scientists has penned a paper warning that just two degrees Celsius of human-caused warming could send us spiralling toward a “hothouse Earth”—one that’s up to five degrees Celsius warmer with sea levels tens of metres higher than present-day. Read More >>

volcanoes
Kilauea’s Eruption Is on Pause—For Now

Three months and countless Olympic swimming pools of lava later, Kilauea seems to have pressed the pause button on its fiery eruption. But it’s too soon to tell if the Hawaiian volcano has chilled out for good. Read More >>

news
The Mendocino Complex Fire Is Now the Largest In California’s History

An enormous wildfire in northern California has become the largest on record for the state, less than a year after the Thomas Fire in southern California earned that dubious distinction. It’s the latest reminder that we now live in an era of fast-growing, hard-to-contain megafires. Read More >>

science
Climate Change Is Causing the Seafloor to Sink

If there’s one thing we’re learning about this global planetary experiment called climate change, it’s that there are unexpected consequences. Case in point: All of the water pouring off Earth’s melting ice sheets is making the oceans heavier, so much so that seafloors are literally sinking. And that could be messing with our measurements of global sea level rise. Read More >>

climate change
Climate Change Is Erasing Human History

UTQIAĠVIK, ALASKA—On a crumbling heap of thousand-year-old garbage overlooking a leaden sea, Anne Jensen shakes her head disapprovingly. A gust of Arctic air whips her hair around her face as she scrutinises the beige house perched sixty feet above us, atop an Iñupiat archaeological site that’s fast eroding into the ocean. Read More >>

science
This Turning-The-Clocks-Back Nonsense Needs to Stop

So, as you know unless you live beyond the concept of time, the clocks turned back this weekend; a process that forces millions to endure their daily commutes in darkness. While many have argued that daylight saving time is pointless and should be abolished, I’d like to firmly disagree with that sentiment: saving daylight is brilliant, and we should do it all year. Read More >>

environment
Geostorm’s Weather Control Tech Is Exceptionally Wrong, Scientists Explain

For a movie about a global weather apocalypse, Geostorm is disastrously boring, but its weather control technology deserves your brief attention. It is uniquely ridiculous! Read More >>

environment
Why Climate Scientists Depend on Alaska’s Indigenous Communities Now More Than Ever

UTQIAĠVIK, ALASKA — Arnold Brower Jr., a 70-year-old Iñupiat whaling captain, can recall his first encounter with scientists clearly. It was 1977, and the International Whaling Commission (IWC) had just placed a moratorium on bowhead whale hunting, after a US government-led population survey determined the marine mammals’ numbers to be dangerously low. But Brower, who has been hunting in the icy Arctic waters surrounding Utqiaġvik (formerly Barrow) since he was a boy, felt certain that conclusion was wrong. Read More >>

science
New Climate Study Doesn’t Contradict Global Warming, No Matter What Breitbart Says

The science news media has a pretty simple job: Find facts, and report them. Typically, this entails reading a scientific study, talking to the study’s authors and outside experts, writing, and fact-checking the confusing bits with experts again. But sometimes, the narrative the media wants isn’t actually supported by the study, or the experts. Such is the case with a new paper on climate change. Read More >>

climate change
As Alaska Thaws, Everything Changes

Bitter winters still dominate life in the Alaskan interior, but a practiced eye can spot the signs of a warming climate, particularly in the ground. Beneath the rolling fields of tussock scattered just north of the Alaska Range, what was once permanently frozen is starting to thaw. The impacts could ripple across the planet. Read More >>

climate change
More Evidence That Pink Snow Will Be a Problem for the Planet

Last year, a team of European researchers was alarmed to learn that glaciers covered in pink snow—caused not by an Ocean Spray truck collision, but by snow-dwelling red algae—were melting faster than the surrounding white ice. Now, another group of researchers has observed the same phenomenon halfway across the world in Alaska. Pink snow really is a problem for Earth’s glaciers, and it could get a lot worse in the future. Read More >>

space
Cassini Is Gone and I’m Not Crying You’re Crying

After a 20-year sojourn in the final frontier, at approximately 1 PM GMT today, NASA’s Jet Propulsion laboratory lost contact with the Cassini spacecraft, which had plunged into Saturn’s atmosphere about an hour and a half prior, ending its 13-year exploration of the Saturn system. Read More >>

environment
240-Year-Old Nautical Maps Reveal How Different Florida’s Coral Reefs Used to Be

Old sailor’s tales about the seas being so full of fish you could walk on them, or oysters the size of frisbees, tend to inspire scepticism today, and for good reason—most of us have very little direct experience with the oceans, except for the occasional news article about how we’ve screwed it up beyond repair. But the oceans of yesteryear really were more plentiful than they are today, and a new analysis of 240-year-old nautical charts hints at just how dramatically things have changed. Read More >>

meteorology
How Hurricane Irma Became Such a Monster

Meteorologists were at a loss for words yesterday as Hurricane Irma intensified into a enormous, record-smashing Category 5. Packing “catastrophic” and “life-threatening” winds of 185 miles per hour (300 km/h), the storm now bearing down on Puerto Rico and the US Virgin islands is officially the strongest Atlantic hurricane ever recorded north of the Caribbean and east of Florida. But how did it get to be such a monster? Read More >>

science
Why Are Sea Levels Around Miami Rising So Much Faster Than Other Places?

In Miami, it’s no secret that flooding is occurring more often, nor that rising sea levels and climate change are to blame. But, as is often the case when you drill down into the inner workings of our planet, the full story is a bit more complicated. Read More >>