volcanoes
Gigantic Pumice Raft from Underwater Eruption Is on a Wild Ride Across the Pacific Ocean

In early August, sailors in the southwest Pacific Ocean began to see their environment transmogrify. As far as the eye could see, the ocean turned from an azure delight into a colossal gathering of clinking, floating rocks. And then came the foul, sulfurous odors. Read More >>

conservation
What Would Happen to Earth If the Avengers Undid Thanos’ Snap?

In 2018, half of all sentient life disappeared with Thanos’ snap of the fingers in Avengers: Infinity War. Five years passed. Read More >>

science
Scientists Witness the Birth of a Submarine Volcano for the First Time

Back on November 11, 2018, a planetwide rumble emanated from somewhere between eastern Africa and Madagascar. This strange signal, thought by scientists at the time to be related to a colossal but hard-to-identify magmatic process, was pinpointed to have come from 48 kilometres east of the island of Mayotte, beneath the waves. Read More >>

science
What Would Really Happen if Thanos Erased Half of All Life on Earth?

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock for the past year, you’ll know that the end of Avengers: Infinity War was a rather bleak affair. Read More >>

science
Scientists Are Gearing Up to Drill Some of the Oldest Ice on the Planet

By trapping bubbles of atmosphere as it freezes, ice imprisons the climate secrets of Earth’s past. The trick is knowing how to find, and then recover, this buried treasure beneath miles of thick ice sheets in the first place. Read More >>

science
Mysterious Planetwide Rumble May Have Come From the Largest Underwater Eruption Ever Recorded

On November 11, 2018, a deep rumble ricocheted around the world, one that humans couldn’t feel but that registered quite clearly on seismometers. A new pre-print paper about the event is now suggesting that it was caused by the largest offshore volcanic event in recorded history. Read More >>

science
The Mad Science Plan to Power the World With Poo

Most people don’t give a second thought to the poo they flush away. But perhaps they should, because the energy contained within our repellent remains is impressive. Read More >>

volcanoes
Why So Many People Choose to Live Near Active Volcanoes

If you’re watching newsreel footage of an eruption, and don’t live near a volcano yourself, you may find yourself wondering, “Why would anyone choose to live there?” Read More >>

climate change
Melting Chunks of Greenland Are Bringing Londoners Face-to-Face With Climate Change

Any Londoners walking past the Tate Modern art gallery this month found it difficult not to stop and stare at a new addition to its courtyard: huge chunks of ice, harvested from the shores of Greenland, had conspicuously materialised. Appearing on 11 December, these 24 icebergs, gleaming with characteristic white-blue brilliance, have been thawing ever since, their meltwater quietly slinking away into the Thames. Read More >>

science
Was Thanos’ Doomed Home World From Avengers Ever Really Habitable? Gizmodo Investigates

The first teaser trailer for Avengers: Endgame dropped last week, featuring a universe devoid of 50 per cent of all living things thanks to Thanos’ extremely poorly thought-through ecological genocide. The Big Bad was inspired to wipe out half of all life after watching his home world of Titan descend into chaos when it couldn’t feed its populace anymore. Read More >>

science
Geologists Joke About ‘Sea Monster’ After Mysterious 30-Minute Rumble Emanates from Waters Near Madagascar

Between Mozambique and Madagascar lies the island of Mayotte. Since May 10, the French Geological Survey has been keeping an eye on a collection of earthquakes taking place just off the island’s eastern shores, which peaked with a magnitude 5.8 shake. This swarm was curious enough all by itself — and then, on November 11, things took a peculiar turn. Read More >>

science
The Time Capsules That Will Outlast the Apocalypse

When we die, we leave behind information. This information can take many forms, from our genetics, replicated in future generations, to posts on the internet. We keep history trapped in photographs, videos, and stories written down into books. Sometimes, we take treasured artefacts, place them within a time capsule, and bury them underground. Read More >>

environment
How an Earthquake in Japan Triggered an Algae Invasion in the Pacific Northwest

In 2011, a colossal tsunami set off by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake slammed into the eastern shores of Japan. Not long afterwards, some of the 1.5 million tonnes of floating debris created by the waves, from buoys and boats to entire fishing docks, began washing up along America’s northwest Pacific coast. Read More >>

conservation
Just Five Countries Control Most of the World’s Remaining Wilderness

There are few corners of the planet humanity has yet to occupy or change. Truly wild areas are rarities, and a new map has carefully identified where exactly the last ones are. Read More >>

science
A Supervolcano’s Colossal Eruption Has Been Lying About Its Age

The most violent eruption of the last 5,000 years was undoubtedly that of Taupo, a volcanic cauldron found in New Zealand. It’s still an active volcanic system, so the more we know about it the better – but the exact age of that eruption has proved to be a puzzle for scientists. Read More >>