space
SpaceX to Perform Its Most Heartwarming Mission Yet

The typical SpaceX payload might include a communications satellite, some ISS supplies, even the occasional spy network. But later this year, the aerospace company will embark on something quite a bit more endearing: a Falcon 9 rocket will carry the cremated remains of beloved family members into space. Read More >>

google
Google Photos Provides a Friendly Reminder That Google Owns You

Google is in the business of you. That’s why it exists. Its phones, Homes, and wireless routers all exist to cull as much information about you as possible so that it can then use that info for (hopefully not evil) financial gain. If you have forgotten that Google exists to collate your entire life, then Google pointedly reminded you today with some new features for Google Photos. It introduced two new features to the Google Photos app that instantly makes it more obnoxious and more present in your life. Read More >>

science
Adorable Carbon Fibre Rocket Is Finally Ready to Launch

Rockets are big, shiny hunks of metal that do extraordinary things — but you’d probably never call one “cute.” Kittens are cute. Capybaras? Definitely. But rockets, not so much — except for this little guy, from New Zealand-based startup Rocket Lab. Its name is Electron, and after years of preparation, its’s finally gearing up to launch as soon as next week. Read More >>

space
Why SpaceX Won’t Be Landing Its Rocket Tonight

After a streak of successful launches, SpaceX is looking damn spiffy. While the best part of watching a SpaceX launch is arguably the last leg of the trip, when the Falcon 9 first stage attempts to land softly back on Earth, tonight, SpaceX will be doing something a little more complicated than its typical launch routine—and as a result, it won’t be trying to land at all. Read More >>

space
SpaceX Just Performed Its Most Mysterious Mission Yet

After a literal last-minute cancellation yesterday, SpaceX successfully launched and landed a Falcon 9 rocket earlier this morning in Cape Canaveral, Florida. While the details on most of SpaceX’s missions are very public, this one was purposely shrouded in mystery: the rocket was ferrying up a spy satellite, the NROL-76, for National Reconnaissance Office (NRO). It was SpaceX’s first big national security payload, and a sign of things to come as the rocket company breaks into the shadowy world of military and national security launches. Read More >>

space
Watch a Rocket Launch in Glorious 360 Degrees for the First Time Ever

Watching a rocket launch is the most wholesome and exciting activity besides going on a rollercoaster or eating large quantities of cheese. Today, at around 16:11 am BST, NASA, in coordination with United Launch Alliance (ULA) and Orbital ATK, will take things to the next level—the agency will be broadcasting the first-ever 360 degree live stream of a rocket launch. Read More >>

space
SpaceX Wants You to Start Saving for Your (Possibly Deadly) Trip to Mars

Elon Musk wants to take you to Mars, but he also wants your sweet Earthling dollars to do that—hundreds of thousands of them, at least. With SpaceX’s most recent success, in which the company launched a reused rocket into orbital space for the first time ever, Mars enthusiasts and billionaires alike are buzzing to get to the Red Planet. Read More >>

drones
New York Company Tests Solar-Powered Drone in Quest to Bring Internet to the World

Those black wings aren’t just for show. This manned, prototype aircraft utilised solar panels to keep itself afloat for around 20 minutes on Friday. Read More >>

space
Space Companies Promise Full Inflatable Space Stations in Orbit by 2020

Over the weekend, SpaceX delivered the International Space Station’s first inflatable module—but there’s more where that came from. United Launch Alliance and Bigelow have announced that they plan to put entire inflatable space stations into orbit by as soon as 2020. Read More >>

airplanes
That Time a Commercial Aircraft Ran Out of Fuel Mid-Flight

On July 23, 1983, in the small Canadian town of Gimli, Manitoba, Captain Robert Pearson and Co-Pilot Maurice Quintal expertly glided a 100-ton Boeing 767carrying 69 people to a safe landing without engines, air brakes or flaps, and minimal control of the aircraft. Read More >>

space
Inside the Boeing Capsule That May Someday Take You to Space

If you're looking to one day spend your summers aboard the scenic International Space Station, your travel options are steadily growing. Now, Boeing has unveiled new interior shots of its next-gen commercial spacecraft, the CST-100. Read More >>

transport
The First Supersonic Private Jet Has Huge Screens Instead of Windows

Windows are kind of a drag for airplanes—literally. They add extra weight, weaken the body, and generally slow down the aircraft; that's why the new Spike S-512 Supersonic Jet won't have any. Instead, passengers get to enjoy their sky-high surroundings on real-time, panoramic video screens. Read More >>

monster machines
The Experimental Hypersonic Rocket Plane That Ushered in the Space Age

Chuck Yeager's historic supersonic flight in 1947 set off a firestorm of research into flight beyond the speed of sound. The most ambitious of these projects was the X-15 program, a top secret USAF program that aimed to test the limits of Mach 7. In X-15: The World's Fastest Rocket Plane and the Pilots Who Ushered in the Space Age, John Anderson and Richard Passman recount the death-defying flights of a steel-nerved team of test pilots at the controls of the world's first rocket plane. Read More >>

business
What Does the 2013 Budget Mean for Tech, Science and Booze?

Blah blah deficit debt cuts reform monetary policy gah. Words. Very important words though -- our new Twitter-friend George's budget determines what the government spends and where for the next year. That has a huge impact on technology, science, and almost everything we care about. Read More >>