technology
Emerging Tech Will Create More Jobs Than It Kills by 2022, World Economic Forum Predicts

The advancement of robotics and artificial intelligence will make 75 million jobs obsolete by the year 2022, according to a new report. Sounds dreadful, but the same report goes on to predict the creation of 133 million new jobs over the same period. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook Is Expanding Photo Fact-Checking Across 17 Countries

Facebook is expanding the scope of its fact-checking partnerships to include photo and video posts in 17 countries, ramping up its effort to hinder election meddling as the U.S. midterms approach. Read More >>

ai
Researchers Come Out With Yet Another Unnerving, New Deepfake Method

Deepfakes, ultrarealistic fake videos manipulated using machine learning, are getting pretty convincing. And researchers continue to develop new methods to create these types of videos, for better or, more likely, for worse. The most recent method comes from researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, who have figured out a way to automatically transfer the “style” of one person to another. Read More >>

robots
New MIT Robot Can Delicately Handle Objects It’s Never Seen Before

Robots in factories are really good at picking up objects they’ve been pre-programmed to handle, but it’s a different story when new objects are thrown into the mix. To overcome this frustrating inflexibility, a team of researchers from MIT devised a system that essentially teaches robots how to assess unfamiliar objects for themselves. Read More >>

ai
This AI Fakes Footage to Make It Look Like You Have Bruno Mars’ Dance Moves

By now we’ve got lots of worrying examples of how AI-powered image processing software can flawlessly alter faces, or make someone appear to say something they didn’t. But there are other, perhaps under-explored uses for this technology: like trying to fake a video of you dancing so it looks like you’ve got Bruno Mars’ moves, instead of Mr. Bean’s. Read More >>

artificial intelligence
Bank Boss Believes Hype About AI Workers Decimating the Workforce

The head economist at the Bank of England thinks that the robotic and artificially intelligent workforces of the future could indeed obliterate our puny human jobs en masse, although how a robot is ever going to change an alternator on a 2006 Peugeot we don't yet know. Read More >>

ai
The Media Tried To Game The Machines and You’ll Never Guess What Happened Next (Facebook Won)

Just five years ago, not only was it possible for a reputable outlet to flatly characterise Upworthy—a website that didn’t make much but a system for testing what drew clicks on Facebook—as the “fastest-growing media company of all time,” but it happened more than once. By 2013, a year after its founding, Upworthy had favourable print profiles and $12 million (£9.4 million) in funding from people like Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes and Reddit’s Alexis Ohanian. Its founder was making the rounds advising other sites hungry for traffic to “stay away from politics” and “focus on Facebook, not Twitter.” Michelle Obama guest-edited the site. Read More >>

ai
M&S is Replacing Call Centre Staff With AI

If a company isn't talking about getting itself on the blockchain, there's a good chance they're trying to get in on the other new big-business buzzword: artificial intelligence. M&S is the latest company to get in on the action, with plans to implement voice recognition and AI to help reroute customer calls. Read More >>

robots
A Where’s Wally-Finding Robot Is Here to Steal Your Toddler’s Only Job

Tired of that smug look of satisfaction on your kid’s face when they’re able to find Wally on a page faster than you can? A creative agency called RedPepper built a robot that levels the Where’s Wally playing field using a camera and machine learning AI to spot the striped traveller in as little as four-and-a-half seconds. Looks like you’re out of a job, little Billy. Read More >>

facial recognition
Axon CEO Says Face Recognition Isn’t Accurate Enough for Body Cams Yet

Face recognition is coming to schools, stadiums, and airports, but surprisingly not to body cameras—yet. On an earnings call Tuesday, Rick Smith, CEO of Axon, one of the largest body camera manufacturers in the US, said the reason was simple: In addition to privacy and policy concerns, face recognition isn’t accurate enough. Read More >>

amazon
Alexa Will Soon Remember How Stupid It Is

Amazon enthusiasts have spotted a new feature being tested in the wild that lets the interactive speaker thing get back to you at a later date, should it currently not know the answer to one of your spoken queries. Read More >>

amazon
Amazon Accidentally Makes Rock-Solid Case for Not Giving Its Face Recognition Tech to Police

Days after the ACLU released a damning report on Amazon’s face recognition product Rekognition, Amazon’s general manager of AI, Dr Matt Wood, countered its findings in a blog post. The ACLU used Rekognition to scan the faces of all 535 members of the US Congress, finding the software mistook 28 of them for suspected criminals. Dr Wood notes first that the ACLU doesn’t reveal its methodology or dataset in the report, then punctuates Amazon’s original response—that it encourages higher confidence thresholds for law enforcement. Read More >>

ibm
IBM Watson Reportedly Recommended Cancer Treatments That Were ‘Unsafe and Incorrect’

Internal company documents from IBM show that medical experts working with the company’s Watson supercomputer found “multiple examples of unsafe and incorrect treatment recommendations” when using the software, according to a report from Stat News. Read More >>

ai
To Fool This Iris Scanner, You’re Gonna Need a Really Fresh Eyeball

When security systems rely on our unique human characteristics—like our fingerprints and eyeballs—techniques for circumventing those systems can be far more macabre than just guessing a password. If someone wanted to fool your iris scanner, for instance, all they really need is your eye. In light of that, a research paper published this month asks an important question: Is there a way to confirm a scanned eyeball is actually alive? Read More >>

drones
Who Will Police Police Drones?

The US Police Foundation doesn’t want the police to call drones “drones.” Because of the public’s association with “military-style weapons like the Predator,” the organisation’s 311-page report reads, the term “drone” is “a major obstacle to law enforcement’s ability to convince the public” that police drone programs “could actually increase public safety, not jeopardise it.” Read More >>