science
Nightmarish Sea Spiders Pump Their Blood Using Their Guts

Earth’s oceans are well-stocked with otherworldly inhabitants, but few of these critters are quite as strange as sea spiders, which look like something that would lurk in the crawlspace under Slender Man’s house. With their impossibly spindly legs, sea spiders—which aren’t even actual spiders—stride across the ocean floor with eerily slow, deliberate steps. They eat by piercing stationary animals like sea anemones and sponges with their long proboscises, and sucking up chunks of tissue softened by digestive juices. Now, new research published in the journal Current Biology piles onto the weirdness, demonstrating that sea spiders move blood and oxygen around their bodies not by pumping their hearts, but by pumping their guts. Read More >>

science
Here’s How Much Bubble Wrap You Need To Wrap A Giant Whale Heart

It’s not every day one stumbles upon a 400-pound-whale heart, but when you do, you put that shit in a museum. Thankfully, that’s exactly what the folks at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) did when they uncovered a dead blue whale in Newfoundland back in 2014. Since then, biologist Jacqueline Miller and her team at ROM have been working tirelessly to put the massive organ on display, and today, they finally did just that. Read More >>

science
How Much Force Could a T-rex Bite Deliver?

In the 1993 cult classic Jurassic Park, a T-rex manages to scare the living shit out of kid heroes Lex and Tim Murphy by casually ripping apart their Ford Explorer like it’s a scrap of meat. It’s a scene that crystallised the destructive power of this extinct apex predator in the public consciousness — and as a new study highlights, it might not have been that hyperbolic. Read More >>

wtf
This Deep Sea Monster Attaches Its Head to Its Neck in the Freakiest Way

We already knew the deep ocean is full of nightmare creatures — twisted amalgams of tooth, jaw and fin sprung to life from some tortured corner of the multiverse. But good news — it gets even weirder! Scientists have just learned that one deep sea predator has a flexible attachment between its head and its skull that allows it to snap its jaws open like a Pez dispenser. Read More >>

medicine
Your Appendix May Not Be as Useless as You Think

New research suggests that the appendix, long believed to be a throwback to our evolutionary past, may serve an important purpose by boosting immunity and acting as a “safe house” for helpful gut bacteria. Read More >>

toys
Turning This Toy Fish Inside Out Reveals All its Glorious Guts

Way back in 2014, Rachel Ciavarella created an unusual plush toy called Morris that could be turned inside out, revealing the fish’s inner biology. The stuffed animal was actually just an experiment in textures and materials, but so many people reached out wanting to buy one that Rachel is finally making the toy available for sale in limited numbers. Read More >>

robots
The Freaky Artificial Muscles on this Human Skeleton Are the Future of Robotics

Using pneumatic pistons and servos to power robots makes them fast and strong, but also bulky and extremely heavy. No one is going to mistake ATLAS for a real human being. To eventually create humanoid-looking robots like the Terminator we need to mechanically replicate every part of the human anatomy — starting with the muscles. Read More >>

science
How Infant Corpses Became Prized Medical Specimens

It’s a well-known fact that the cadavers of adult men were utilised in medical research and for educational purposes in the 18th and 19th centuries. However, a new anthropological study from the University of Cambridge offers fascinating details about another common, but poorly documented, area of human medical history. Read More >>

science
Dead People’s Fists Suggest Fighting May Have Helped Humans Evolve

The human hand developed in its own unique way because of our 'dark side', according to research from the University of Utah. Biology professor and lead author David Carrier has suggested that our hands evolved for fighting, as well as using tools, and his theory hasn't gone down too well. Read More >>

sex
I Got My Friends to Try Female Condoms. Here’s What They Thought

I know they’ve been ridiculed. I know some people think they’re ew. Thing is, I don’t believe in judging things on blind emotion. I believe in data. So I recruited two of my friends and their partners, all of whom have a really good sense of humour, to test some female condoms for me. Read More >>

foodmodo
The Anatomy of Steak Cuts Explained in Two Minutes

If you've ever wondered what the difference between a Kansas City Strip and a Sirloin was, or where the hell the T in your T-bone came from, this video will help. Read More >>

science
Scientists Turned This Entire Mouse Transparent Using Detergent

Last year, scientists did the wacky and cool thing of making a mouse brain transparent. Now they've gone and done it to an entire mouse by pumping detergent through its veins. The transparent mouse looks like gross rodent jello (yes, there is a photo), but it's also an incredible new way to study what intact organs look like on the inside. Read More >>

science
What is the Resolution of the Human Eye?

The new iPhone camera is eight megapixels. Meanwhile, Canon is reportedly testing a new DSLR with 75 megapixels. But how many megapixels is the human eye? That is, how many megapixels would an image the size of your field of vision need to be to look normal? Read More >>

booze
Forensic Artist Reveals the Face of That Skull-Shaped Vodka Bottle

Ever wonder what the face might look like for that skull-shaped Crystal Head vodka bottle? Well, one Scottish forensic scientist recently found out. Read More >>