archaeology
Intense Heat From Ancient Vesuvius Eruption Caused Victims’ Skulls to Explode

During the Mount Vesuvius eruption of 79 AD, clouds of superheated gas enveloped the ancient city of Pompeii and its surrounding areas, instantly vaporising bodily fluids and soft tissues, according to new research. Sounds grim, but this mode of death was actually a blessing in disguise, given the alternatives. Read More >>

food
Archaeologists Find Oldest Example of Nutmeg-Spiced Food, Just in Time for Autumn

Mmmm, nutmeg. It’s the spice that adds a certain something to custards and hot cups of coffee. We love our nutmeg to an embarrassing degree, but as a recent archaeological discovery shows, its origins date back to a very different time—and far longer ago than we realised. Read More >>

archaeology
Ancient Bronze Hand Found in Switzerland Mystifies Archaeologists

In October 2017, a pair of treasure-hunting metal detectorists made an extraordinary discovery near a Swiss lake: a sculpted bronze hand with a gold cuff dating back some 3,500 years. Archaeologists have never seen anything quite like it, and are at a loss to explain its purpose or function. And in an unfortunate turn, the hand is now at the centre of a criminal investigation. Read More >>

archaeology
Archaeologists Have Found the World’s Oldest Known Drawing in a South African Cave

Some 73,000 years ago in what is now South Africa, an early human used a red ochre crayon to draw a cross-hatched pattern onto a smooth flake, according to new research published today. It’s now considered the earliest evidence of drawing in the archaeological record. Read More >>

archaeology
Ancient Jar of Roman Gold Coins Discovered Under Italian Theatre

Archaeologists unearthed a pot of gold coins dating back to the 5th century AD under an abandoned theatre near Milan, Italy. Read More >>

archaeology
Medieval Board Game Unearthed in Secret Castle Chamber

Last month, Russian archaeologists found a secret chamber inside a medieval castle. While exploring this previously unknown area, the archaeologists discovered a clay brick with tracings of what appears to be a medieval board game. Read More >>

archaeology
Greek Farmer Discovers 3,400 Year-Old Tomb Beneath His Olive Grove

As reported in Cretapost, the unnamed farmer was trying to park his vehicle under the shade of an olive tree when the ground beneath him began to sink. After pulling away, the farmer noticed that a hole, measuring about four feet wide (1.2 meters), had suddenly appeared. As he gazed into the void from above, he quickly realised he had stumbled upon something important. Read More >>

archaeology
Doomed 19th-Century Arctic Expedition Wasn’t Brought Down by Lead Poisoning, Study Finds

The Franklin Expedition, a 19th-century mission to chart a fabled northwest passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific ocean, ended in the deaths of all 128 crewmen. A prevailing theory suggests lead poisoning was a major contributor to the sailors’ ultimate demise — a theory that can finally be put to rest, according to new research. Read More >>

science
We’ve Got the Meat: Scientists Unearth Final Ingredient to the Forbidden Sandwich

It’s been a summer of historic archaeological finds that have left world feeling stunned by the scope of history. These incredible discoveries have also left some with an implacable urge to eat these important specimens. Now that researchers have unearthed a perfectly preserved prehistoric foal, the ingredients for The Forbidden Sandwich are finally all here. Read More >>

archaeology
Scientists Find Evidence of 1,000-Year-Old Parrot-Breeding Operation in the American Southwest

DNA evidence appears to have revealed an ancient parrot-breeding operation in the southwestern United States, a new study reports. Read More >>

archaeology
We’re Learning More About the Contents of that Mysterious Egyptian Sarcophagus

Back in July, Egyptian archaeologists dared to open a strange granite sarcophagus, finding three skeletons soaking in an unsightly reddish-brown liquid. Scientists have now completed a preliminary analysis of the coffin’s contents, offering new insights into the tomb’s 2,000-year-old occupants. Read More >>

archaeology
Ancient Cemetery Packed With Hundreds of Bodies Discovered in Kenya

Archaeologists in Kenya have discovered a 5,000-year-old cemetery containing at least 580 bodies. Built by Africa’s earliest herders, the ancient cemetery contains virtually no signs of social stratification, pointing to a surprisingly egalitarian society. Read More >>

archaeology
Sunken Russian Warship Rumored to Contain 200 Tons of Gold Discovered Near South Korea

A missing Russian Imperial Navy cruiser said to contain 200 tons of gold bullion worth an estimated $133 billion (£101bn) has been discovered after being lost at sea for 113 years. Read More >>

archaeology
Experts Say Recent ‘Alien’ Mummy Study Was Deeply Flawed and Unethical

Earlier this year, scientists from Stanford University in the US concluded that a strange skeleton known as the Atacama Mummy belonged to a human girl whose physical malformations were the result of several severe genetic mutations. A team of international experts is now questioning these findings, and accusing the scientists of breaching standard research ethics. Read More >>

science
Discovery of 14,000-Year-Old Toast Suggests Bread Can Be Added to Paleo Diet

Archaeologists have uncovered the earliest evidence of bread-making at a site in northeastern Jordan. Dating back some 14,400 years, the discovery shows that ancient hunter-gatherers were making and eating bread 4,000 years before the Neolithic era and the introduction of agriculture. So much for the “Paleo Diet” actually being a thing. Read More >>