history
Danish Workers Unearth ‘Still-Sharp’ Medieval Sword While Digging Out Sewer

When plumbing planner Jannick Vestergaard and engineer Henning Nøh woke up on the morning of February 5th, it likely never occurred to them that their day’s work would result in the discovery of an extraordinary double-edged sword dating back to the 14th century. Read More >>

archaeology
See Inside the Newly Renovated King Tut’s Tomb

Years of steadily accumulating dust and grime had taken a toll on King Tut’s tomb, but a recently completed restoration project has revitalised the historic chamber, while making much-needed infrastructure improvements to prevent ongoing decay. Read More >>

history
World War I-Era German Submarine Resurfaces From the Sand Near French Coast

The remains of SM UC-61, a World War I German minelaying submarine c(also known as a U-boat) is resurfacing on the coast of Wissant near Calais over a century after it was abandoned and scuttled by its 26-sailor crew before they surrendered to the French, the BBC reported on Saturday. Read More >>

archaeology
Trove of Decapitated Skeletons in England Sparks Archaeological Mystery

Archaeologists are trying to figure out why so many bodies at a 1,700-year-old site in Suffolk, England, were buried alongside their decapitated heads. Read More >>

archaeology
Skull Soup, Viking Tech, and More: The Wildest Archaeological Discoveries of 2018

Archaeologists dug up a lot of cool stuff in 2018, but they dug up a lot of weird, disgusting, and disturbing stuff as well. Here are the strangest archaeology stories the year had to offer. Read More >>

archaeology
Hundreds of Weevils Found Encased in Ancient Japanese Pot

Thousands of years ago, Japanese artisans had a habit of mixing maize weevils into their clay when making pottery. The recent discovery of a single pot packed with an estimated 500 weevils is adding to our knowledge of this practice, and the extent to which these destructive pests plagued ancient Japan. Read More >>

archaeology
The Fossils of the 21st Century

In 100 million years, human civilisation will have bit the dust. Perhaps a nuclear war scorched the planet, or a last-ditch bid to solve climate change backfired horribly. Or, more optimistically, we overcame the myriad challenges of the 21st century, took to the stars and evolved into new species on alien worlds. Either way, what you and I consider humans will have long since vanished, our memories lost to the grinding colossus of time. Read More >>

archaeology
Young Warrior in Gruesome Iron Age Grave Was ‘Killed’ Again After Death

He was somewhere between the age of 17 and 25 when he died, apparently of natural causes. But for reasons that are unclear, this warrior’s body was speared and clubbed prior to burial, in what is now a fascinating Iron Age mystery. A distinct possibility is that it was done to prevent him from rising from the dead, say archaeologists. Read More >>

science
Ancient Black Plague Found in Swedish Gravesite

Long before the two deadliest pandemics in history—the Plague of Justinian and the Black Plague—an ancient strain of the bacterium responsible for these scourges, Yersinia pestis, may have already wreaked havoc among Neolithic European communities over 5,000 years ago, according to a controversial new study. Read More >>

photography
Egyptian Officials Are Pissed Off About an Alleged Nude Photoshoot on the Great Pyramid

Egyptian authorities are not very happy with a video taken by Danish photographer Andreas Hvid, who climbed what appeared to be the Great Pyramid of Giza, took a video of himself and a female friend what was euphemistically termed a “naked embrace,” and then uploaded it to YouTube in the past week, CNN reported on Saturday. Read More >>

science
The Biggest Science Stories of 2018

This year taught us more about distant planets and our own world, about the ways we’re influencing our environment and the ways we’re changing ourselves. A whole lot of stuff happened, and last January seems like it was, well, a year ago. Read More >>

archaeology
Elaborate Burials Uncovered at Fifth-Century Anglo-Saxon Cemetery

Archaeologists working in eastern England have discovered a previously unknown Anglo-Saxon cemetery dating back some 1,600 years. At least 20 graves have been uncovered, including many lavish burials belonging to women. Read More >>

science
Gaze Upon the Reconstructed Face of an Infamous 19th Century Assassin

One of the most intriguing items on display at the Queen Mary Pathology Museum – the skull belonging to British assassin John Bellingham – has been used to create a digital reconstruction of the killer’s face. Read More >>

archaeology
Neanderthals Weren’t the Violent Brutes We Thought, New Research Finds

The stereotype of a typical Neanderthal life is that it was extraordinarily difficult, violent, and traumatic. But a comparative analysis of the remains left behind by Neanderthals and contemporaneous humans is finally overturning this unwarranted assumption. Read More >>

science
Incredible Bird-Dinosaur Specimen Thrills Scientists After 25 Years in Museum Storage

A museum might wow you with all of its fossil specimens on display, but that’s often just a small part of what’s really there – specimens in the back might lay in drawers or plaster-wrapped in boxes, quietly holding yet-to-be-revealed secrets or further mysteries about the past. Such is the case with an incredible bird fossil, found 25 years ago in Utah but only just described. Read More >>