science
Hundreds of Stone Tools Uncovered at Prehistoric ‘Picnic Spot’

Archaeologists in Israel have uncovered an ancient sweet spot in which early humans flourished some 500,000 years ago. Read More >>

science
Paper Scraps Recovered From Blackbeard’s Cannon Reveal What Pirates Were Reading

Old-timey pirates are typically portrayed as stupid, unrefined thugs whose only interests involved plundering captured ships and forcing enemies to walk the plank. The recent discovery of legible text on paper pulled from the cannon of Blackbeard’s flagship paints a strikingly different picture of these misunderstood sailors. Read More >>

history
Discovery of Unknown Ancient Population Changes Our Understanding of How North America Was Settled

She died 11,500 years ago at the tender age of six weeks in what is now the interior of Alaska. Dubbed “Sunrise Girl-child” by the local indigenous people, the remains of the Ice Age infant—uncovered at an archaeological dig in 2013—contained traces of DNA, allowing scientists to perform a full genomic analysis. Incredibly, this baby girl belonged to a previously unknown population of ancient Native Americans—a discovery that’s changing what we know about the continent’s first people. Read More >>

history
Sunken Australian Submarine From WWI Finally Found After 103 Years

Just six weeks into the First World War, Australian submarine HMAS AE1 disappeared without a trace somewhere off the coast of New Guinea, marking the first time an allied sub had been lost in the conflict. Marine archaeologists have now discovered the historic wreck, ending a mystery that has endured for over a century. Read More >>

science
The Coolest Scientific Discoveries of 2017

Science may be just a tool to help us understand our Universe. But we can all agree that one of its major perks is that leads to the discovery of plenty of really cool, mind-boggling stuff. Read More >>

science
Morbid Experiment Proves This Neolithic Weapon Was an Effective Skull Crusher

Humans have been killing other humans since the dawn of the species, but owing to the poor archaeological record, it’s unclear what sort of weapons our ancestors used to brutalise one another. Using models of human skulls and a replica of a weapon dating back thousands of years, researchers have shown that a bat-like club known as the “Thames Beater” was fit for the task of killing. Read More >>

archaeology
Decades After Discovery, 3,500-Year-Old Mummy Found in Egyptian Tomb

Egyptian archaeologists working in Luxor have explored two tombs dating back to the 18th Dynasty, uncovering colourful figurines, funeral masks, a stunning mural—and a linen-wrapped mummy. Read More >>

history
Secret Time Capsule Found Inside Jesus’ Bum

While preserving an 18th century wooden statue of Jesus, a team of Spanish restorers was surprised to discover a time capsule hidden within the hollowed-out arse portion of the carving. Written by a Catholic chaplain, the detailed document contains economic, political, and cultural information about the time period. Read More >>

archaeology
Ancient Cave Art Depicts Oldest Evidence of Dogs Wearing Leashes

A new analysis of ancient rock art demonstrates that humans hunted with dogs on the Arabian Peninsula over 8,000 years ago—and it looks like those dogs wore leashes. Read More >>

archaeology
Stunned Scientists Detect Suspected Hidden Chamber Within Great Pyramid of Giza

Though they were constructed nearly 5,000 years ago, the Great Pyramids of Egypt are still packed with secrets. Using a technique that leverages the power of cosmic rays, scientists have confirmed the presence of a large empty space within Khufu’s pyramid—a void that’s signalling the presence of a possible hidden chamber. Read More >>

history
Historians May Have Been Wrong About This Ancient Roman Vase for Centuries

New research shows that the British Museum’s most famous artefact—the Portland Vase—was manufactured by a different technique than the one traditionally assumed by historians and archaeologists. Read More >>

science
Neanderthals With Disabilities Survived Through Social Support

A re-analysis of a 50,000-year-old Neanderthal skull shows that, in addition to enduring multiple injuries and debilitations, this male individual was also profoundly deaf. Yet he lived well into his 40s, which is quite old by Paleolithic standards. It’s an achievement that could have only been possible with the help of others, according to new research. Read More >>

archaeology
Experts Cast Doubt On Viking Textile With ‘Allah’ Inscription

Researchers from Sweden made headlines last week after claiming to have found the Arabic characters for “Allah” and “Ali” woven into Viking burial costumes. The discovery suggested a more intimate cultural relationship between the Vikings and the Arab world, but some experts are now questioning key assertions made by the Swedish researchers. Read More >>

history
Restored Prisoner’s Letter Uncovers Horrific Details of Life at Auschwitz Death Camp

In 1944, Marcel Nadjari—a Greek Jew who was forced to remove bodies from the Auschwitz gas chambers—buried a letter in a forest near the camp. The text was rediscovered in 1980, but it was virtually unreadable. Using a new imaging technique, scientists have finally reconstructed the letter, and it’s providing harrowing new details of the Holocaust—and what it was like to work as a forced labourer in a Nazi extermination camp. Read More >>

science
Humans Have Even More Neanderthal DNA Than We Realised

A international team of researchers has completed one of the most detailed analyses of a Neanderthal genome to date. Among the many new findings, the researchers learned that Neanderthals first mated with modern humans a surprisingly long time ago, and that humans living today have more Neanderthal DNA than we assumed. Read More >>