archaeology
Newly Discovered Neanderthal Skeleton Hints at Intentional ‘Flower Burial’

New excavations at a well-known Neanderthal site have revealed a previously undiscovered Neanderthal skeleton, along with more evidence that these extinct hominins may have had “flower burials” for their dead. Read More >>

archaeology
Skeleton Found in Submerged Mexican Cave Sheds New Light on Earliest People in America

An extraordinary 9,900-year-old skeleton found in the submerged caves of Tulum is both enhancing and complicating our understanding of the first humans to settle in the Americas. Read More >>

archaeology
Free-Diving Neanderthals Gathered Tools From the Seafloor

New evidence suggests Neanderthals gathered clam shells and volcanic rock from the bottom of the Mediterranean, which they fashioned into tools. The work is yet more evidence that Neanderthals often ventured into the water, and it adds to the body of research showing that they were nothing like the unintelligent, uncoordinated clods they’ve long been portrayed to be. Read More >>

science
An Extinct Human Species May Not Have Evolved in Asia After All, New Research Suggests

New research suggests Homo erectus – the most successful hominin prior to the emergence of modern humans – reached southeast Asia later than is conventionally assumed. It’s a significant finding, as it casts doubt on a theory that points to an Asian birthplace for this now-extinct species. Read More >>

anthropology
Prehistoric Stone Monument in Scotland May Have Been Intentionally Built to Attract Lightning

Researchers working in the Outer Hebrides island chain off the west coast of Scotland have uncovered evidence of a previously unknown rock monument located within a stone’s throw of the iconic Calanais Standing Stones. Read More >>

archaeology
Prehistoric Humans Built a Wall to Keep Out the Sea – But It Failed

A 7,000-year-old seawall has been discovered off the Israeli coast, and it’s now the oldest-known defence against rising sea levels. The seawall eventually failed, and the village had to be abandoned, in what’s serving as an ominous lesson from the past. Read More >>

anthropology
Prehistoric Turks Wore Human Teeth as Jewellery, Rare Discovery Reveals

Researchers in Turkey have uncovered modified Neolithic human teeth that were worn as pendants, perhaps in a necklace or bracelet, in a rare and perplexing archaeological find. Read More >>

archaeology
44,000-Year-Old Cave Painting Could Be the Earliest Known Depiction of Hunting

Archaeologists in Indonesia have stumbled upon an extraordinarily old cave painting which appears to depict human-like figures in pursuit of wild pigs and buffaloes. It’s quite possibly the oldest portrayal of a hunting scene in the archaeological record, but the vague nature of the artwork leaves it open to interpretation. Read More >>

science
Bullets That Killed President Kennedy to be Released as 3D Scans

Have you been hankering to see the bullets that killed President John F. Kennedy in Dallas, Texas on that fateful day in 1963? Researchers sometimes ask the U.S. National Archives and Record Administration (NARA) if they can see the bullets, but the U.S. government doesn’t like to give people access given their fragility. That’s going to change soon, and starting next year, anyone with an Internet connection will be able to examine the bullets up close, all thanks to 3D scanning technology. Read More >>

archaeology
Why Did Vikings Bury Two People in Boats on Top of Each Other, 100 Years Apart?

Archaeologists in central Norway have discovered an unusual Viking burial site in which one boat grave was placed on top of another. On its own, that’s pretty odd – but it’s even weirder considering the two burials are separated by 100 years. Read More >>

archaeology
Infant Skeletons Wearing ‘Helmets’ Made of Other Children’s Skulls Stun Archaeologists

Archaeologists in Ecuador have uncovered evidence of a previously undocumented funeral ritual, in which the heads of recently deceased infants were adorned with the skulls of other children. Scientists can only speculate as to the reasons why. Read More >>

science
Radar Scans Reveal Ancient Human Footprint Embedded in Mammoth Track

Tens of thousands of years ago, a human walked north at what is now White Sands National Monument in the US state of New Mexico. A large proboscidean, possibly a Columbian mammoth, later walked west, stepping onto one of the footprints left by the human. Soon after, a person – perhaps the same individual who had gone north – walked south, parallel to the earlier tracks. And in walking south, they stepped directly into one of the mammoth’s footprints. Read More >>

archaeology
How This Decade of Archaeology Changed What We Know About Human Origins

Unlike humans living today, our distant ancestors exerted a very small footprint on the planet, leaving barely anything behind to chronicle their time on Earth. With the discovery of each new skull fragment, femur, and stone tool, however, archaeologists are methodically piecing together the fractured history of our species and other hominins closely related to us. Read More >>

science
A 15,000-Year-Old Trap for Catching Woolly Mammoths Has Been Discovered in Mexico

Archaeologists working at a site near Mexico City have unearthed a 15,000-year-old trap built by humans to capture mammoths, in what’s the first discovery of its kind. Read More >>

archaeology
Yet More Evidence That Neanderthal Bling Included Eagle Talons

New fossil evidence suggests the Neanderthal practice of collecting eagle talons, which were likely worn as jewellery or used to create powerful symbols, was more extensive than previously thought. Remarkably, the dating of these artefacts suggests modern humans might have copied this practice. Read More >>