technology
Emerging Tech Will Create More Jobs Than It Kills by 2022, World Economic Forum Predicts

The advancement of robotics and artificial intelligence will make 75 million jobs obsolete by the year 2022, according to a new report. Sounds dreadful, but the same report goes on to predict the creation of 133 million new jobs over the same period. Read More >>

robots
New MIT Robot Can Delicately Handle Objects It’s Never Seen Before

Robots in factories are really good at picking up objects they’ve been pre-programmed to handle, but it’s a different story when new objects are thrown into the mix. To overcome this frustrating inflexibility, a team of researchers from MIT devised a system that essentially teaches robots how to assess unfamiliar objects for themselves. Read More >>

movies
9 Movies With AI That Became Self-Aware and Made Humankind Very Sorry

Who could forget the events of 29 August 1997—when Skynet became self-aware and launched a whole mess of nukes, unleashing “Judgement Day?” Yesterday was a holiday for Terminator fans, and it’s also a great excuse to celebrate our favourite sci-fi movies that feature AI rebellions. Let’s bid a warm welcome to our new robot overlords. Read More >>

artificial intelligence
Bank Boss Believes Hype About AI Workers Decimating the Workforce

The head economist at the Bank of England thinks that the robotic and artificially intelligent workforces of the future could indeed obliterate our puny human jobs en masse, although how a robot is ever going to change an alternator on a 2006 Peugeot we don't yet know. Read More >>

ai
The Media Tried To Game The Machines and You’ll Never Guess What Happened Next (Facebook Won)

Just five years ago, not only was it possible for a reputable outlet to flatly characterise Upworthy—a website that didn’t make much but a system for testing what drew clicks on Facebook—as the “fastest-growing media company of all time,” but it happened more than once. By 2013, a year after its founding, Upworthy had favourable print profiles and $12 million (£9.4 million) in funding from people like Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes and Reddit’s Alexis Ohanian. Its founder was making the rounds advising other sites hungry for traffic to “stay away from politics” and “focus on Facebook, not Twitter.” Michelle Obama guest-edited the site. Read More >>

wtf
This Online AI Tool Takes Your Words And Turns Them Into Nightmares

We’ve seen lots of machine learning systems create strange new phrases and dreamlike images after being trained on large amounts of data. But a new website lets you do the generating, and the results are just as bizarre as you’d expect: Read More >>

robots
A Where’s Wally-Finding Robot Is Here to Steal Your Toddler’s Only Job

Tired of that smug look of satisfaction on your kid’s face when they’re able to find Wally on a page faster than you can? A creative agency called RedPepper built a robot that levels the Where’s Wally playing field using a camera and machine learning AI to spot the striped traveller in as little as four-and-a-half seconds. Looks like you’re out of a job, little Billy. Read More >>

amazon
Amazon Accidentally Makes Rock-Solid Case for Not Giving Its Face Recognition Tech to Police

Days after the ACLU released a damning report on Amazon’s face recognition product Rekognition, Amazon’s general manager of AI, Dr Matt Wood, countered its findings in a blog post. The ACLU used Rekognition to scan the faces of all 535 members of the US Congress, finding the software mistook 28 of them for suspected criminals. Dr Wood notes first that the ACLU doesn’t reveal its methodology or dataset in the report, then punctuates Amazon’s original response—that it encourages higher confidence thresholds for law enforcement. Read More >>

ai
To Fool This Iris Scanner, You’re Gonna Need a Really Fresh Eyeball

When security systems rely on our unique human characteristics—like our fingerprints and eyeballs—techniques for circumventing those systems can be far more macabre than just guessing a password. If someone wanted to fool your iris scanner, for instance, all they really need is your eye. In light of that, a research paper published this month asks an important question: Is there a way to confirm a scanned eyeball is actually alive? Read More >>

drones
Who Will Police Police Drones?

The US Police Foundation doesn’t want the police to call drones “drones.” Because of the public’s association with “military-style weapons like the Predator,” the organisation’s 311-page report reads, the term “drone” is “a major obstacle to law enforcement’s ability to convince the public” that police drone programs “could actually increase public safety, not jeopardise it.” Read More >>

artificial intelligence
Thousands of Top AI Experts Vow to Never Build Lethal Autonomous Weapons

Hundreds of companies and thousands of individuals, many of them researchers and engineers prominent in the fields of robotics and artificial intelligence, vowed on Wednesday never to apply their skills toward the creation of autonomous killing machines. Read More >>

artificial intelligence
This is the Most Aerodynamic Bike, According to AI

Competitors at this year’s World Human Powered Speed Challenge are going to have to contend with this — a bullet-shaped bike designed by an artificially intelligent software program. Read More >>

science
My 15 Favourite Science and Tech Books for Smart Beach Reading

Summer is upon us, which means it’s time to put together a reading list, whether it’s for the beach, your cottage, or the hammock in your garden. Here are 15 science and technology books that will keep your nerdy brains engaged and titillated. Read More >>

google
Google is Reportedly Looking to Take Over Call Centres With Its Duplex AI Assistant

When Google introduced Google Duplex, its AI assistant designed to speak like a human, the company showed off how the average person could use the tech to save time making reservations and whatnot. What wasn’t touched on was the possibility that Duplex may have a use on the other side of the line, taking over for call centre employees and telemarketers. Read More >>

science
AI and Carbon Nanotubes Are Now Being Used to Improve the World’s… Keyboards?

When it comes to groundbreaking research, there are two fields that seem to occupy the newscycle: carbon nanotubes and artificial intelligence. The potential combination of those two fields of study seems like it could radically change the word as we know it, or, as South Korean scientists have discovered, at least change how we type. Read More >>