science
What Do Great White Sharks Fear? Murderous Orcas

If movies were scientifically accurate, here’s how Jaws would pan out: As the film’s signature theme begins to play, a black dorsal fin slinks around the water’s surface. Great white sharks flee in fear as the camera reveals the true menace: a killer whale. Read More >>

space
The International Space Station is a Cesspool of Bacteria and Fungi, Study Finds

An extensive survey of bacteria and fungi on surfaces inside the International Space Station has revealed an astonishing number of microorganisms living among the astronauts – the health impacts of which aren’t entirely clear. Read More >>

science
Penis-Shaped, Wood-Munching Clams Are More Diverse Than We Thought, Study Finds

Wood-boring clams don’t look like the ones you or I might find steamed with pasta. They’re smaller than a pea, and live exclusively in the deep ocean, tunnelling into sunken, waterlogged trees that were swept out to sea long ago to eat the wood. Now, scientists have determined that there are quite a few more groups of these bizarre molluscs than we thought. Read More >>

animals
Here is an Important Scientific Study About How Animals Relax

Scientists have determined that the way an animal rests – reclining on its back, sprawling on its belly, standing up, or sitting, is determined by primarily by its size. But more importantly, the study authors have provided a large selection of images of animals luxuriating in various ways, and they are delightful. Read More >>

science
Bug Scientists Squash ‘Insect Apocalypse’ Paper

Last month, an alarming scientific paper warned that over 40 per cent of all insect species are in decline. News of an impending “insectageddon”—a world either devoid of insects or plagued with pests—was broadcast far and wide by the media. There’s just one problem: Entomologists don’t buy it. Read More >>

animals
Surprise! Sun Bears, Like Dogs and Humans, Mimic Each Other’s Faces

The sun bear, already well-known online for its silly faces, is the first non-primate, non-domesticated animal found to mimic the facial expressions of its playmates. The new research adds complexity to our understanding of the ways animals communicate. Read More >>

science
Fascinating Experiment Suggests Some Humans Can Sense Earth’s Magnetic Field

The ability to sense the Earth’s magnetic field—a trait known as magnetoreception—is well documented among many animals, but researchers have struggled to show that humans are also capable of the feat. Until now. Read More >>

giz asks
What’s the Least Useful Body Part?

We’re all familiar with the flashy, big-ticket organs: the heart, the brain, the lungs. Their celebrity often obscures the work—humbler, less heroic, but often no less essential to the maintenance of a life—performed by those organs only doctors know about: the body’s back-up players, pulsing and pumping in relative obscurity. Not to mention the mid-tier organs, like the gallbladder, whose functions most of us only dimly comprehend, unless—or until—they start acting up. Read More >>

animals
Scientists Capture Rare Footage of Mysterious ‘Type D’ Killer Whale, Possibly a New Species

In 1955, 17 killer whales were found stranded on a beach in Paraparaumu, New Zealand. Scientists thought they looked weird, but they shrugged it off as some type of genetic deformity. Since then, the whale has been something of an urban legend until fishermen and tourists began capturing rare images of the animals. Read More >>

animals
Why Do Opossums Love Trash?

While some might find them gross, you could say that the animals we associate with garbage like opossums and raccoons are ecological success stories. We humans drastically change our environments wherever we go, yet these crafty critters figure out a way to thrive in our presence. They use our trash to survive. Read More >>

science
Time Now for Some Gnarly Photos of Spiders Eating Other Animals

Spiders are creepy even at the best of times, but new photos taken from the Amazon rainforest put these predatory creatures in an even more fearsome light: as they’re chomping down on animals of unusual sizes. Read More >>

science
Incredible Experiment Gives Infrared Vision to Mice – and Humans Could Be Next

By injecting nanoparticles into the eyes of mice, scientists gave them the ability to see near-infrared light—a wavelength not normally visible to rodents (or people). It’s an extraordinary achievement, one made even more extraordinary with the realisation that a similar technique could be used in humans. Read More >>

science
NASA Produces Building Blocks of Life in Experimental Recreation of Ancient Earth

How did life first start? Scientists hoping to answer that question are recreating the conditions of early Earth’s oceans in a lab. Read More >>

space
Simulated Mission in Chilean Desert Shows How a Rover Could Detect Life on Mars

By using the barren Atacama Desert in Chile as a stand-in for Mars, researchers have shown that it’s possible to use an autonomous rover-mounted drill to detect life beneath a desolate surface. Encouragingly, the test resulted in the discovery of a resilient microorganism – exactly the kind of creature that could lurk deep beneath the Martian surface. Read More >>

science
Body of a Cancer Patient Left Radioactive Material at Arizona Crematorium

An Arizona crematorium was contaminated with radiation after the cremation of a patient who’d received radiopharmaceutical treatment, according to a new case study. Read More >>