science
Smart Female Guppies Don’t Wind Up With Losers

Guppies might look like mindless, mouth-breathing little bastards, but it turns out some of them make better dating decisions than we do. No, really—these tiny fish, with their infinitesimal brains, are somehow more discerning with their mates than us, and we literally invented rockets. And Doritos. Read More >>

science
You Don’t Want to Know How a Climate Change-Induced Mass Extinction Can End (Hint: Lizards)

It’s a widely accepted fact that we’re fucked. That’s sort of in a general sense. You, reader, are certainly not making it past 2100. And civilisation? Maybe it will meet its maker from superbugs and nuclear war in 50 years, or sea level rise in a few centuries. Maybe it’ll be an asteroid in a thousand years, or the sun engulfing the planet in a few billion. Or, maybe a new mass extinction event will result in a fucking lizard-pocalypse, which is basically what happened in Australia 35 million years ago. Read More >>

health
Two-Thirds of All Cancer Mutations Are ‘Unavoidable,’ Scientists Claim

In a study that’s bound to attract considerable controversy, a pair of researchers are claiming that between 60 and 66 per cent of all cancer-causing mutations are the result of random DNA copying errors, making them essentially unavoidable. The new research is offering important insights into how cancer emerges, and how it should be diagnosed and treated—but many questions remain. Read More >>

space
NASA Experiment Could Solve a Mystery About DNA in Space

While we all want to travel, live, and bang in space, there are some pretty major things to consider, such as the fact that our sentient flesh cocoons were not designed to handle the harsh conditions of the cosmic void. Though research like NASA’s Twin Study will illuminate some of the potential impacts of extended spaceflight on our bodies, so many mysteries remain — particularly when it comes to what’s going to happen to our DNA. Read More >>

neuroscience
The Brains of Blind People Really Are Wired to Enhance Other Senses

It’s often said that the loss of one sense improves the others. New research shows the dramatic extent to which this is true in blind people, and how their brains make new connections to boost hearing, smell, touch — and even cognitive functions such as memory and language. Read More >>

science
How Deadly Spider Venom Might Save Lives

Funnel web spiders are a perplexing bunch. The eight-legged Australian creatures can kill with their venom, but are simultaneously required for creating the antidote. Now, it turns out their venom might have another purpose—protecting the brain from the damaging effects of a stroke. Read More >>

watch this
This Time Lapse of Cell Division in a Tadpole Egg Is Freaky and Beautiful

The creation of new life is a miracle, but ugh, it sure can take forever. Thanks to the wonders of time lapse photography, however, one YouTuber was able to cut the entire development cycle of a tadpole down to just 20 seconds. It almost looks fake, but it’s as real as life gets. Read More >>

science
Wait, Crabs Can Climb Trees?!

Scientists recently discovered a new species of crab in Hong Kong. It’s very tiny, less than a centimeter long. It also climbs trees, which is terrifying. Read More >>

science
This Poor Cretaceous Damselfly Has Been Waiting 100 Million Years to Get Laid

Scientists in China have discovered male damselflies caught in the act of trying to court females inside a piece of 100-million-year old amber. It’s an extremely rare find, providing a glimpse of insectoid peacocking behaviour during the age of dinosaurs. Read More >>

tardigrades
The Incredible Way Tardigrades Survive Total Dehydration

Tardigrades, also known as “water bears”, are probably the toughest microscopic creatures on the planet, capable of surviving freezing, radiation, and even the vacuum of space. They’re also able to withstand complete dehydration—and scientists have finally figured out how they do it. Read More >>

science
An Odour Sensor on Malaria Mosquitoes Specifically Targets Human Stench

Researchers at Vanderbilt University have found a secondary set of odour sensors on female malarial mosquitoes that appear to be specifically tuned to sniff out humans. While admittedly disturbing, the discovery could lead to new ways of combating malarial mosquitoes and the dreaded disease they carry. Read More >>

science
How Did You End Up With Red Hair?

People from different parts of the world look different, and sometimes it feels weird to ask why. But yes, there is in fact chemistry and genetics behind the way we look. Read More >>

snakes
The Deadliest Cobras Also Look the Most Terrifying

Cobras are renowned for their devastating flesh-eating venom, and the dramatic way they rear their heads upwards to flare their hoods. New research clarifies the purpose of these tactics and how they emerged among cobras—insights that could help scientists develop more powerful anti-venoms, and help you spot an especially deadly cobra before it’s too late. Read More >>

animals
Zoos Are So Afraid of Poachers They’re Starting to Cut the Horns Off Their Rhinos

A Czech zoo has decided to remove the horns of 18 white rhinos after a deadly attack last week at a French zoo where poachers shot a rhino and used a chainsaw to cut off its horns. Welcome to the new normal, where even zoo animals have to be mutilated to protect them from poaching. Read More >>