Scientists Use Nintendo Controller-Guided Robot Fish to Spy on Real Fish

The ocean covers more than two-thirds of our planet, and there’s so much of it left unexplored. How are we humans supposed to blend in to uncover all of its secrets, when our observation tools are hooked to clunky vehicles with fish-scaring propellers and jets? Read More >>

giz asks
Why Is My Face Changing Shape as I Get Older?

Two decades of healthy growth, followed by four to eight decades of slow-motion physical and mental collapse—that’s life, for most of us, despite the efforts of various deluded cranks and tech billionaires. Time spares nothing, and seems particularly to have it out for our faces, paying just as much attention to skin-level deformations (worry-lines, wrinkles, tumorous outgrowths) as it does to the large-scale hollowings and saggings which, over time, change the actual shape of our faces. Read More >>

Parents Are Still Reluctant to Give Peanuts to Infants, Despite New Guidelines

Early last year, in a colossal U-turn, the NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) issued updated clinical guidelines advising parents to feed peanuts to infants at an early age to prevent the onset of dangerous allergies. More than a year later, parents—who for years were warned to do the exact opposite—are either unaware of the new guidelines or still wary of the recommendations, according to the latest research. Read More >>

Ancient Human Groups Mated With the Mysterious Denisovans At Least Twice

Genetic analysis suggests two populations of Denisovans—an extinct group of hominids closely related to Neanderthals—existed outside of Africa during the Pleistocene, and that both of these populations interacted and interbred with anatomically modern humans. Read More >>

giz asks
What’s the Filthiest Animal?

Ever since the 19th century, when disease was first linked to sewage-contaminated water, humans have gone to great lengths to escape their own filth. Meanwhile, animals have gone on revelling in the stuff—eating it, strategically dropping it, flinging it around just to pass the time, etc. Same goes for mud, piss, vomit, blood and rotting carcasses of every make and vintage. Most creatures just don’t have our hang-ups. Read More >>

These Hawaiian Stick Spiders Have a Profound Case of Evolutionary Déjà Vu

Environments make species. This was the fundamental biology lesson that was drilled into Charles Darwin when he visited the Galápagos Islands back in 1835, a trip that ultimately inspired his theory of natural selection. Nearly 200 years later, scientists in Hawaii have stumbled upon a fascinating evolutionary quirk that would’ve made Darwin proud—the discovery of spiders that are independently and repeatedly evolving the same characteristics over and over again. Read More >>

Trump Administration, Which Said It Would Keep African Elephant Trophy Ban, Changes Its Mind

After months of back and forth on the subject, President Donald Trump’s administration has done what everyone pretty much knew it would do the whole time and has lifted a ban on the importation of some African elephant trophies from Zimbabwe and Zambia. Read More >>

More Evidence That Dogs ‘See’ the World With Their Powerful Noses

Dogs are equipped with a powerful sense of smell, but scientists haven’t been sure if our canine companions are capable of linking an aroma or scent to a physical object. New research suggests this is very much the case, and that dogs form a mental picture in their mind of the target when they’re tracking down a scent. Read More >>

Termite Armies Send Their Oldest Soldiers to Die First

You might not be cool sending your elderly grandparents to the front lines of war. But termites think differently—if gran and granddad are already old and close to death, termites figure they might as well be the first casualties. Read More >>

First Observation of Rigor Mortis in Worms Could Help Us Understand Death by Old Age

Living creatures do amazing things. They grow toward the sun, build cities, lay eggs, and some even bone. But living things must die, and when they do, they tend to get smelly and mushy pretty quickly. But the moments after death, before decomposition, can be amazing in their own right. Scientists have just learned a bit more about this mysterious time by studying common worms. Read More >>

giz asks
How Do You Hear Without ‘Ears’?

History’s littered with lost ears: Van Gogh’s, Evander Holyfield’s, that ear Kyle MacLachlan finds in a field in Blue Velvet, etc. Or maybe ears is the wrong word. The weird little flesh-whorls that jut out from the sides of most of our heads are just small components of a much larger, delicately interconnected system. Remove part of that system with a razor-blade upon learning that your brother is getting married, and you risk seriously compromising it. Read More >>

Termites Are Finally Being Recognised For What They Really Are: Social Cockroaches

Very quietly, and without any formal announcement, the Common Names Committee of the Entomological Society of America has decided to list termites in the same category as cockroaches. It seems weird to lump the two together, but it’s a move that scientists have been considering for nearly a century. Read More >>

Huge Advancement in MRI Tech Captures Teeny Molecules With Incredible Resolution

The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines in hospitals are great at creating pictures of the human body. For decades, scientists have hoped that the same technology could be used to examine much smaller things, like individual molecules. Now, a team from Canada and the United States has revealed a new, high-resolution MRI method with resolutions down to two nanometres, the width of a DNA strand. Read More >>

New Species of Tardigrade Discovered in Japanese Car Park

Say hello to Macrobiotus shonaicus, a completely new species of tardigrade—those incredibly resilient microscopic wee beasties that likely have what it takes to survive the apocalypse. Read More >>

Experiment Shows Microbes Could Thrive on Saturn’s Moon Enceladus

Enceladus is one of the most fascinating objects in the Solar System. Parked in orbit around Saturn, the ice-covered moon features a warm subterranean ocean and the basic chemical ingredients for life. But could alien microbes actually survive there? A new experiment suggests the answer is yes. Read More >>