space
A Cool, Gassy Ring Has Been Detected Around Our Galaxy’s Gigantic Black Hole

Using the ALMA observatory, scientists have detected a previously undocumented band of cool gas wrapped around the black hole at the core of our galaxy. Read More >>

space
What’s the Hottest Object in the Universe?

Thirty degrees might seem hot, when you’re sweating through your shirt in July—but on a cosmic scale it barely registers. The Sun itself is over 15 million degrees; and in a hottest-object contest, the Sun wouldn’t even rank. Scientists, in fact, have produced temperatures many times that, right here on Earth (in terms of kinetic energy in microscopic places). We reached out to a number of scientists for this week’s Giz Asks—astronomers and physicists—to find out what the hottest object in the universe actually is. Read More >>

science
Laboratory Black Hole Shows Stephen Hawking Was Right, Obviously

Physicists have confirmed predictions of Stephen Hawking’s namesake theory of black holes using a black hole they constructed in their lab, according to a new paper. Read More >>

space
Astronomers Make Movie of Black Hole Spinning Like a Top

Scientists around the world were able to create a short visualisation of an active black hole wobbling like a top, according to a new paper—an important observation for the field. Read More >>

space
Gravitational Wave Detectors Spot Two Potential Black Hole Collisions in a Week

Less than two weeks after the gravitational wave detectors turned back on, they’ve already seen evidence of two pairs of colliding black holes. Read More >>

space
Why Doesn’t the Black Hole Image Look Like the One From Interstellar?

No one knew what a black hole looked like before yesterday. Sure, we thought we knew, thanks to simulations and the now-famous black hole featured in the movie Interstellar. Read More >>

space
What We Learned From the First Black Hole Image

Today, scientists from the Event Horizon Telescope released a picture that will go down in scientific history: the first-ever image of a black hole. But there’s more to science than pretty pictures. Alongside the release, scientists dropped six papers documenting how they created the image and what they’ve already learned about the black hole at the centre of M87, a galaxy 55 million light-years away. Read More >>

space
This is the First Photo of a Black Hole

Abandon all hope, ye who enter here: scientists have presented the first-ever image of a black hole. Read More >>

space
We May Get the First Close-Up Image of a Black Hole Next Week

The Event Horizon Telescope, a network of telescopes on mission to observe supermassive black holes at the centres of galaxies, is set to release its first results in a public press conference next week. Read More >>

space
A Star Fell Into a Black Hole, Revealing Its Super-Fast Spin

Scientists have measured a fundamental property of a supermassive black hole—how fast it spins—by measuring a star slamming into it. Read More >>

giz asks
What Happens When Two Black Holes Collide?

On 14 September 2015, signals from one of the Universe’s most mind-boggling, powerful events produced the tiniest signal in a pair of detectors, one in the US state of Louisiana and one in the state of Washington. They’d detected two already-wild objects, black holes, slamming into one another. Read More >>

space
Physicists Spot Four Black Hole Collisions, Including the Largest One Ever Recorded

Physicists have spotted four new instances of black holes colliding and sending their gravitational waves toward the Earth, including the most massive collision recorded to date. Read More >>

science
How the Universe Ends

Somewhere between a second and a millennium from now, you will die. Your body and all of its parts will cease functioning and rejoin the Earth as regular, lifeless stuff. The Earth, too, will die, engulfed by an expanding, ageing Sun. The Sun will burn off all of its fuel and end up a white dwarf, then burn out and die. The Milky Way will collide with nearby Andromeda, and form a large, elliptical galaxy, which will die by losing all of its stars to intergalactic space. The corpses of those remaining stars will die, decaying into their constituent parts. The universe will age onward, until all matter is either stored in black holes or floating as free elementary particles. Those black holes will evaporate, and then universe will die. All that was will be an icy cold nothing, forever. Read More >>

space
NASA’s Flagship X-Ray Telescope Back Online After Weekend Safe Mode

One of NASA’s flagship telescopes, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, went into safe mode last week following gyroscope problems. That telescope is now back up and running. Read More >>

space
Astronomers Spot a Black Hole Sucking Up an Earth-Size Clump of Matter

You might think of black holes as enormous vacuum cleaners, sucking in all the matter and light that ventures too close. But confusingly, scientists normally see stuff leaving the area around a black hole, via jets of matter and light from ripped-apart dust. It’s rare to see matter get devoured. Read More >>