security
Hackers Can Turn Body Cameras Into Malware Spewing Machines, Security Expert Says

Once lauded as tools to enhance police accountability, body cameras have been facing increasing scrutiny from privacy advocates, and now one researcher has identified them as cybersecurity time bombs. Speaking to Wired ahead of a Def Con presentation, Josh Mitchell, a consultant at the security firm Nuix, demonstrated that many body cameras are vulnerable to hacking, making several different nightmare scenarios possible: officers themselves could be tracked while wearing the cameras, footage could be doctored or deleted entirely, and the cameras could be hijacked to spread ransomware or other malicious code throughout police networks. Read More >>

security
New AI Could Turn Police Body Cams Into Nightmare Surveillance Tools

Time and time again, police officers shoot, and sometimes kill, civilians holding harmless objects, later claiming they mistook them for guns: a phone, a bible, and a Wii controller. In early February, police body camera manufacturer Taser announced that it had acquired the artificial intelligence startup Dextro Inc—a “computer vision” research team that claims it can use object recognition software to train officers to better discern actual threats. But privacy experts find the surveillance and profiling possibilities offered by this latest, but certainly not last, upgrade to police body cameras unsettling. Moreover, the question remains: The cameras may be getting smarter, but are they actually making the public safer? Read More >>

crime
22,000 Body Cameras are Being Given to London Police

In the grand scheme of things, forcing the police to wear body cameras isn't such a bad idea. Especially since they apparently cut complaints by more than 90 per cent, and have probably have a lot of amusing YouTube-worthy footage. Read More >>