science
Heading a Football Can Worsen Cognition for Up to 24 Hours, Study Finds

A new study of football players seems to show that repeated mild blows to the head can affect athletes’ brain function, at least temporarily. It found evidence that players perform worse on simple tests of eye coordination and cognition right after heading a ball than players who simply kick it around, for up to 24 hours later. Read More >>

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We Finally Know Why This 2,600-Year-Old Human Brain Is So Freakishly Well-Preserved

An Iron Age human skull found in 2008 contained an unprecedented amount of preserved brain material, a discovery that has confounded scientists for over a decade. New research finally explains why this brain resisted decay for thousands of years. Read More >>

science
Antarctic Explorers’ Brains Shrunk During a 14-Month Polar Expedition

Spending more than a year in the bleak desolation that is Antarctica might change your brain for the worse, according to new research out this month. It seems to show that polar explorers who lived for 14 months at an Antarctica research station experienced brain shrinkage, likely as a result of their isolation and boredom. But the effects on their actual health and cognition were mild and probably temporary. Read More >>

science
New Study Links Birth Control Pill to Brain Differences, but Don’t Panic

Scientists this week say they’ve found preliminary evidence that women who use birth control pills have differences in their brain structure compared to women who don’t. But it’s still too way early to know whether these differences are genuine or could have a meaningful impact on someone’s health. Read More >>

science
Most People Experiencing Homelessness Have Had a Traumatic Brain Injury, Study Finds

A majority of people experiencing homelessness across the world have a history of concussions and other traumatic brain injuries, according to new research out this week. And often, these injuries could have contributed to or been caused by their homelessness, the authors say. Read More >>

science
Remarkable Scans Show How the Human Brain Rewires Itself After Half Is Removed

In rare cases, patients suffering from severe epilepsy undergo an operation in which an entire brain hemisphere is removed. New research shows the startling degree to which the remaining hemisphere is able to pick up the slack. Read More >>

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Scientists See Human-Like Brain Waves in Lab-Grown Mini-Brains

One way that scientists can non-invasively study the human brain is by growing “mini-brains”, clusters of brain cells each about the size of a pea, in the lab. In a fascinating progression of this line of research, a team this week reports that they observed human-like brainwaves from these organoids. Read More >>

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Using Neurostimulation to Treat ADHD Isn’t as Scary as It Sounds

Late last month, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cleared the Monarch external Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation (eTNS) system, a medical device that provides mild brain stimulation to treatment attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children ages 7 to 12, for use in America. Read More >>

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Emirati Woman Reportedly Regains Awareness After 27 Years in Coma

A woman from the United Arab Emirates, Munira Abdulla, has reportedly regained a degree awareness and function after spending an astonishing 27 years in a state of reduced consciousness – popularly known as a coma. Read More >>

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Blind People Really Do Have More Sensitive Hearing, MRI Study Finds

A new study out Monday suggests that losing your sight early in life can lead to subtle alterations in the brain circuitry primarily responsible for hearing Read More >>

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Scientists Partially Revive Disembodied Pig Brains, Raising Huge Questions

Researchers from Yale have developed a system capable of restoring some functionality to the brains of decapitated pigs for at least 10 hours after death. The achievement has tremendous scientific potential, but it raises some serious ethical and philosophical concerns. Read More >>

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In the Wake of Failed Alzheimer’s Drug Trials, Scientists Are Cautiously Finding Hope With a New Strategy

The field of Alzheimer’s research one filled with disappointment. Just last week, yet another drug failed its Phase 3 clinical trial, continuing the 15-year-long losing streak since a truly new Alzheimer’s treatment was approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Read More >>

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Scientists Gave Mice a Psychedelic Drug to Figure Out How We Hallucinate

Seeing something that isn’t there can be one of the strangest, frightening, and baffling experiences a person can have. But scientists at the University of Oregon in the US say they’ve come a bit closer to understanding what happens in the brain when we hallucinate—and all they had to do was trip out some poor mice. Read More >>

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Scientists Come Closer to Finding Out What Consciousness Looks Like in the Brain 

Most of the time, it’s easy to tell when someone is consciously aware. But there are many tragic cases when it’s unclear whether a person who is unresponsive after a serious brain injury is truly no longer conscious. That ambiguity can raise ethical questions about how to manage or ultimately end such a person’s life-sustaining care. Read More >>

brains
How a Periodic Table of Brains Could Revolutionise Neuroscience

Between your ears sits perhaps the most complex piece of biological machinery on the planet: an all-in-one computer, simulator, and creation device that operates out of a squishy, folded gray mass. And scientists aren’t quite sure how it works. Read More >>