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Genius Crabs Use Natural Velcro to Cover Themselves in Camouflage

Some animals are born with natural camouflage that allows them to hide in their native habitats. But what happens when the ebb and flow of the daily tides is constantly changing your home turf? If you’re the the decorator crab, you simply grab whatever sea plants you can find and use them to disguise yourself. Read More >>

science
Fossil Reconstruction Shows How Dinosaurs Used Camouflage to Evade Prey

Researchers from Bristol University have reconstructed the colour patterns of a Cretaceous-era Psittacosaurus, revealing not just its colours and distinct shading patterns, but also clues about the life and environment in which this extinct dinosaur lived. Read More >>

image cache
This Crazy Artwork is Inspired By First World War Camouflage

This art installation, known as Dazzle room, was created by Japanese artist Shigeki Matsuyama after he learned about a kind of camouflage used during the First World War. Read More >>

how to
What WWII’s Top Secret British Spy Manual Can Teach You About Wilderness Survival

As WWII heated up, England’s Special Operations Executive put all of its secret spy training collective tradecraft knowledge into a single training manual. And, it turns out that training spies to operate behind enemy lines is often good training for going outdoors, too. Read More >>

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Watch the Unbelievable Camouflage Super Powers of an Octopus

Octopuses have become my favourite animals because it's very clear that they possess super powers from an alien world and even clearer that they use those powers for evil (or exactly how I would use them). Here's an octopus showing off his truly incredible camouflage powers. It goes from a brown mound to a blue water alien real quick. Read More >>

design
Why Camouflage Wasn’t Used Until the First World War

The general idea behind visual camouflage, which is to make distinctive, recognisable shapes difficult to pick out against a background, was nothing new in 1914. The point of camouflage isn't necessarily to make oneself totally invisible, which isn't practical for a large army. Read More >>

design
The Strange, Sad Story of the US Army’s New Billion-Dollar Camo Pattern

After nearly a decade, multiple false-starts, and many billions of dollars, the US Army has finally chosen a new camouflage for its troops. Except it's not exactly new. It was originally developed back in 2002. And it looks exactly like one of the patterns that the US Army was in talks to adopt from an independent company. Read More >>

research
MIT Develop a Camouflage Generator That Can Hide Almost Anything

Researchers at MIT have developed a new algorithm that generates camouflage patterns that let an object blend into any surroundings, not just a jungle or the desert. Read More >>

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Octopus Instantly Changes Colours to Blend in With a Fishing Boat

It's not news that an octopus, the alien super villain of the big bad ocean, can change colours to camouflage itself but just watch as this octopus try to blend in with a boat in seconds. Read More >>

research
Researchers Invent a Camouflage Material That Changes Like a Chameleon

Mother Nature has already mastered the art of camouflage, so it only makes sense that we steal her ideas when it comes to the art of hiding. Researchers over in the US at the University of Michigan have developed a remarkable new material "inspired" by chameleons, which can change shape and colour under different lighting conditions. Read More >>

olympics
Subtle Snowy Camo Pattern Helps US Skiers Cheat Their Way Down Bumpy Moguls Runs

We've already seen (or haven't) the nearly invisible waterproof zippers that Columbia introduced on its sportswear designed for various Olympians competing at Sochi. But the uniforms designed specifically for the US moguls ski team have another hard-to-spot feature that could let them cheat give them a small advantage in competition. Read More >>

military
The History of Invisibility and the Future of Camouflage

In 2004, the U.S. Army made a colossal mistake. It introduced a new digital camouflage called the Universal Camouflage Pattern (UCP), a single pattern designed to work across all environments. Only a few months later, however, as the war in Iraq was intensifying by the day, every soldier on the ground knew the truth: by trying to work in every situation, UCP worked in none of them. Read More >>