wearables
The World’s First Working Projector Smartwatch Turns Your Arm Into a Big Touchscreen

Some smartwatches come with powerful processors, lots of storage, and robust software, but have limited capabilities compared to smartphones thanks to their tiny touchscreens. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, however, have now created a smartwatch prototype with a built-in projector that turns the wearer’s arm into a smartphone-sized touchscreen. Read More >>

science
Screwing In This Lightbulb Turns Your Entire Desk Into a Touchscreen Smartphone

What if all those apps you rely on at work weren’t trapped on your smartphone’s tiny screen? They may not be for much longer. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Future Interfaces Group lab have come up with a novel way for your smartphone to spill out onto your desk while still letting you interact with apps you rely on using your fingers. Read More >>

cars
Who Does This Self-Driving Cadillac CT6 Belong To?

An anonymous tipster shared a photo of a Cadillac CT6, outfitted with autonomous driving sensors and scanners, which they spotted parked in Pittsburgh yesterday. Read More >>

science
Scientists Figure Out How to Turn Anything Into a Touchscreen Using Conductive Spray Paint

Touchscreen smartphones and tablets are so intuitive that even babies can easily learn how to use them. So why can’t any object work like a touchscreen? Everything from guitars to Jell-O might soon be able to, thanks to scientists at Carnegie Mellon University who came up with a way to use conductive spray paint to make almost any object touch-friendly. Read More >>

research
Brilliant Mod Makes Smartwatches Actually Useful

Back in October, an analysis of the smartwatch industry found that sales were plummeting. That was quickly rebuffed by a different analysis that said sales were rising. One thing is for sure, smartwatches are boring. But this one is pretty awesome. Read More >>

3d printing
We Can Finally 3D-Print Hair

Could this be the ‘killer app’ for 3D printers that finally makes them a must-have device for every home? Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Human-Computer Interaction Institute have found a way to use 3D printers to create realistic-looking hair, bristles, and other fibres. Read More >>

robots
Who Decided a Hexapod With Robot Snakes for Legs Was a Good Idea?

When it comes to mobility and articulation, it turns out that using six robot snakes as legs actually results in a walking hexapod that can easily scramble over almost any terrain. But when it comes to our deep down fears that one day these creations will over throw us, nothing seem as terrifying as this autonomous creation chasing you down the street. Read More >>

smartwatches
A Joystick-Inspired Interface Could Solve Smartwatches’ Biggest Problem

The smartwatch revival isn't going away anytime soon, but maybe this time around we can finally figure out a way to make their tiny displays useful for more than just showing notifications. In fact, a group of researchers from Carnegie Mellon might have finally figured out how with a concept watch that can be twisted, tilted, and clicked. Read More >>

3d printing
Hands-On With the World’s First 3D-Printed Teddy Bear

Despite the existence of softer plastics and materials, 3D printers are still primarily designed to create hard, solid objects that don't have much bend or give. But a researcher at Carnegie Mellon University has successfully hacked a machine to create the world's first 3D-printed teddy bear using a technique called felting. Read More >>

Robot Snake
robots
No No No. That Creepy Robot Snake Strangles on Contact Now

We've been following the development of Carnegie Mellon's robotic snake for some time now. And as much as it's a brilliant piece of technology, it's also downright scary how realistically it can slither across the ground or up a tree. But it turns out that's no where near as unsettling as its latest trick. Read More >>

OmniTouch
guts
The OmniTouch Makes Any Surface Interactive

For all the power and connectivity that modern mobile devices offer these days, why are we still typing on screens (or, God forbid, numerical pads) barely three fingers wide? A new wearable GUI system aims to turn any surface within arm's reach into an input device. Read More >>