space
This Is Our Best Look Yet at Saturn’s Aurora

Sometimes, things line up just perfectly. For example, back in 2017, the Hubble Space Telescope got a full view of Saturn’s northern aurora. The newly-released image above isn’t exactly what Hubble saw – but it’s still exciting, I promise. Read More >>

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Listen to the Sound of Saturn’s Electromagnetic Energy

Sound and light have way more in common than you think, which is why it’s easy to turn light data, like radio waves, into sound. This can make for some pretty incredible science communicating tools – just look up Jupiter’s whistlers, falling bomb sounds caused by the planet’s lightning; or the chirp of LIGO’s gravitational wave detection, an ascending bloop as two black holes collide. Read More >>

space
NASA to Extend Juno Jupiter Mission by Three Years

The Juno spacecraft currently orbiting Jupiter was supposed end its mission by crashing into the gas giant next month. Not anymore! Read More >>

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Saturn’s Rings Look Razor-Thin in This Posthumous Cassini Release

It’s been more than six months since the Cassini probe plummeted to its demise, but scientists are still releasing incredible images from two-decade mission to Saturn. Read More >>

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This Is the Spot Where the Cassini Spacecraft Plunged Into Saturn

On September 15, 2017, the Cassini spacecraft ended its valiant 13-year mission by performing a kamikaze dive into Saturn’s upper atmosphere. A new image released by NASA shows the exact spot where the Cassini craft was lost to us forever. Read More >>

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Cassini Swan Song Image of Saturn Left Me Speechless

Planets and robots lack hearts and minds, but they’re especially good at impacting ours. In its last days before ending itself, human-built Cassini turned around and snapped this farewell mosaic image of Saturn. Its title: “Farewell to Saturn.” Read More >>

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Cassini Dropped Its Most Mind-Blowing Look At Saturn’s Rings Yet

Though Cassini only has a few days left to study Saturn before it dies, it’s seriously making them count. Today, NASA released what it says are “the highest-resolution colour images of any part of Saturn’s rings.” In true Cassini fashion, they’re absolutely mesmerising. Read More >>

science
Cassini’s ‘Inside Out’ Movie From Within Saturn’s Rings Will Make You Emotional

On September 15th, Cassini’s 20-year-long exploration of the Saturnian system will finally—regrettably—come to an end. But even in its final act, the spacecraft has been sending back some of the most detailed images it’s ever taken. In one of its recent dives into the gap between Saturn and its rings, the spacecraft took a sequence of photos that offer an striking and unusual view of Saturn’s main rings—and now it’s a mini-movie. Read More >>

space
Saturn’s Moon Titan May Have the Perfect Landing Spot For Spacecraft

Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, is a giant nightmare beach. While its electrically charged sand wouldn’t make for a relaxing holiday, new research suggests the planet might not be as hostile to robotic visitors as we think. Although its lakes are full of ultra-cold liquid methane and ethane, they could be placid enough for future space probe to land on. Still not great for swimming, though. Read More >>

space
Cassini’s Second Grand Finale Dive Might Be Outshining the First One

Cassini’s six-month-long Grand Finale mission has become the unofficial nerd Super Bowl: each time the NASA-led spacecraft drops a new batch of raw images, we jump to our computers and frantically scroll through to find the best. (Actually, we never leave our computers, because we are nerds.) But in any case, the raw photos from Cassini’s second dive into the gap between Saturn and its rings are now available—and honestly, they might even be better than the first round. Read More >>

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This Is Our First ‘Sound’ From the Creepy Void Inside Saturn’s Rings

Today, Cassini prepares to once again boldly go where no spacecraft has gone before: into the gap between Saturn and its rings. While we’re all excited to see the the results of Cassini’s second dive, astronomers are still parsing through the findings from her first. And some, including a soundscape generated from the emptiness, are pretty freaky. Read More >>

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Saturn Looks Haunted in Cassini’s First Grand Finale Photos

Good morning, Cassini! Today, at about 8:00am BST, NASA’s Deep Space Network Goldstone Complex in California’s acquired the orbiter’s signal for the first time since it began its series of Grand Finale dives. The photos it took from the space between Saturn and its rings, which have just been released, are nothing short of breathtaking. It’s classic Cassini, making the previously impossible look easy. Read More >>

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Cassini Has Made Earth Feel Small, But Part of Something Bigger

Earth is exhausting — excruciatingly so, if you’re a young curmudgeon like me. At times, performing even the most mundane tasks, like commuting on a crowded, smelly subway car, feels like an Olympic marathon designed to test one’s patience. Space compels us because it forces us to think outside this myopic view of ourselves — not in a “Dust in the Wind” way, but in the sense that we’re tiny flecks of star stuff lucky to be members of something so vast and incredible. And in recent years, one of the greatest reminders of this is the volume of research and images sent back to Earth from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, which first entered Saturn’s system in 2004. Read More >>

space
This Picture of Earth From Within Saturn’s Rings Will Make You Emotional

Sometimes, the majesty of the final frontier—a cold, unfeeling space—has the power to make our eyes misty. The images from NASA’s Cassini mission have often been able to do this, and since the spacecraft is dying soon, it makes the experience all the more emotional. Before it goes out in a blaze of glory, Cassini has been sending back some of the most incredible images of Saturn and its moons—but one of its latest from Saturn’s rings is especially spectacular. Read More >>

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Watch How a Beloved Spacecraft Will Die in Saturn’s Atmosphere

As if we already weren’t sad enough about Cassini’s imminent demise, NASA has now created a video so that we can watch what the spacecraft’s final moments will look like when it smashes into Saturn’s atmosphere on September 15th. Read More >>