science
How Hibernating Squirrels Could Ease the Organ Shortage Crisis

Squirrels and other hibernating animals have an almost magical ability to withstand frigid temperatures. New research has uncovered the biological factors involved in keeping cellular structures intact during hibernation—a finding that could eventually be used to preserve human organs prior to transplantation. Read More >>

medicine
An Innovative New Cancer Therapy Hijacks Bacteria to Fight Tumours

Researchers from South Korea have engineered a strain of bacteria that infiltrates tumours and fools the body’s immune system into attacking cancer cells. In experiments, the modified bacteria worked to reduce cancer in mice, raising hope for human trials. Read More >>

science
Young Blood May Not Reverse Ageing After All

Speculation has emerged in recent years that young blood can reverse the ageing process, raising the prospect of an exciting new rejuvenation technique. A new study contradicts this claim, pointing to other factors that may be responsible for the perceived anti-ageing effects of young blood. Read More >>

science
Our Best View Yet of Molecules Moving Inside Living Cells

A new microscope developed by the Marine Biological Laboratory in Chicago is allowing scientists track the position and orientation of individual molecules in living cells. It has the potential to reveal unknown aspects of molecular behaviour, including those that turn cells into agents of disease. Read More >>

research
How a Flu Virus Invades a Cell

Researchers from the University of Washington are the first to visualise the insidious way that the flu virus latches onto a cell and ploughs its way inside, causing an infection. Read More >>

science
A Flaw Has Been Detected in a Ground-Breaking Fertility Treatment

Scientists say a groundbreaking fertility treatment to correct potentially harmful genetic mutations has the potential to backfire, recreating the exact mutation the intervention was meant to fix. It’s a problem that could put an immediate halt to the pending practice—but a work-around may be possible. Read More >>

science
Scientists Are One Step Closer to Building ‘Artificial Wombs’

Scientists have sustained human embryos in a petri dish for 13 days, shattering the previous record of nine days. The breakthrough will allow researchers to study early foetal development in unprecedented detail, and brings us one step closer to viable “artificial wombs.” But it’s adding fuel to an already heated ethical debate. Read More >>