particle physics
New Analysis of Large Hadron Collider Results Confirms Something Weird Is Happening

A theory-defying anomaly has persisted in the latest results from a Large Hadron Collider experiment, according to new results. Read More >>

science
A Wild, Six-Quark Particle Might Have Been Dark Matter All Along

Most of the matter in the universe is undetectable in any way except for the gravity it exerts. While some think this mysterious “dark matter” must be made up of unknown particles, others suggest a familiar particle could be the key. Read More >>

science
Release the Muons! Physics Breakthrough Will Lead to a New Kind of Particle Collider

The next generation of atom smasher could be a 100-kilometer-round ring, costing over $10 billion, with no promise of finding something as glamorous as last decade’s Higgs boson. But does the future of physics need to be so large? What if researchers could probe the secrets of the smallest particles using technology that was, well, smaller? Read More >>

science
CERN’s Oldest Particle Accelerator is Still Running, 60 Years Later

The oldest particle accelerator at CERN, home to the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, is celebrating its 60th birthday. It’s still running. Read More >>

science
Let’s Pump The Brakes On the So-Called “No-Brainer Nobel Prize”

Researchers in Hungary have published the exciting new claim that they’ve discovered a new subatomic particle, but it’s nowhere near time to start talking about Nobel Prizes as CNN (and now everyone who syndicates them) has done. Read More >>

science
Could Antimatter Be the Portal Into the Dark Universe?

A new paper asks: What if antimatter is the portal into the dark universe? Read More >>

science
Scientists Debut Powerful Magnet for Future Particle Collider

Physicists at Fermilab have produced and tested a powerful magnet of the sort that could appear in the next generation of particle colliders. Read More >>

internet
How the Chaos of Studying Subatomic Particles Inspired the Creation of the Web

30 years ago this month, Tim Berners-Lee penned his original proposal for what would become the World Wide Web. At the time, he was working at CERN, the high-energy physics lab in Geneva, Switzerland best known these days for operating the Large Hadron Collider. In many histories of the web, this fact is treated as a footnote, but it was specifically the messiness of international scientific collaboration that spurred the creation of the space we live much of our lives on today. Read More >>

science
CERN Drops Italian Scientist Who Complained About Women in Physics

Last September, Italian physicist Alessandro Strumia gave a bizarre lecture at CERN in which he argued—to an audience of young women scientists—that women are less qualified to conduct physics than men. On Thursday, CERN officially severed its association with Strumia. Read More >>

internet
Travel Back to 1990 With the Original World Wide Web Browser

The World Wide Web turns 30 this year, and to celebrate three decades of utter chaos and brilliance, CERN developers and designers have created a version of the original WorldWideWeb browser that can run inside a modern browser. What, you wonder, is it like to surf the original web? Well, give it a try here. It’s kind of a pain! Read More >>

science
CERN Unveils Design for 62-Mile-Round Atom Smasher More Powerful Than the Large Hadron Collider

A scientific collaboration has released a concept design for the Large Hadron Collider’s successor, an enormous new experiment that would sit inside a hundred-kilometre (62-mile) tunnel. Read More >>

science
Why the Large Hadron Collider Is Shutting Down for Two Years

The Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest atom smasher, will be turned off for the next two years for upgrades. Hopefully, its particle-hunting abilities will be even better once it restarts in 2021. Read More >>

science
More Than 200 Physicists Denounce Sexist Lecture at CERN

A group of 19 physicists penned a statement denouncing the talk given last week by Italian physicist Alessandro Strumia at a workshop on women in high energy physics held at CERN in Switzerland. More than 200 physicists, including Nobel Prize winner David Gross and several prominent physicist-authors, and at least 850 academics from other fields, have signed the statement as of Friday morning. Read More >>

science
The Large Hadron Collider Turns 10: Here’s What’s Next for Particle Physics

Yesterday marked the 10th anniversary of when the Large Hadron Collider first powered on. Since it’s already achieved its most well-known goal—to discover the Higgs boson—you might wonder what else is happening at the famous collider. Read More >>

science
Physicists Achieve Incredible Electron-Accelerating Feat at Small Scale

Particle physics experiments are huge—they have to be, in order to accelerate particles with enough energy to properly study them. The Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland is nearly 17 miles around, while others are closer to the 2-mile range. But scientists working on a new experiment reported Wednesday that they’ve accelerated electrons to high energies in just 33 feet. Read More >>