internet
How the Chaos of Studying Subatomic Particles Inspired the Creation of the Web

30 years ago this month, Tim Berners-Lee penned his original proposal for what would become the World Wide Web. At the time, he was working at CERN, the high-energy physics lab in Geneva, Switzerland best known these days for operating the Large Hadron Collider. In many histories of the web, this fact is treated as a footnote, but it was specifically the messiness of international scientific collaboration that spurred the creation of the space we live much of our lives on today. Read More >>

science
CERN Drops Italian Scientist Who Complained About Women in Physics

Last September, Italian physicist Alessandro Strumia gave a bizarre lecture at CERN in which he argued—to an audience of young women scientists—that women are less qualified to conduct physics than men. On Thursday, CERN officially severed its association with Strumia. Read More >>

internet
Travel Back to 1990 With the Original World Wide Web Browser

The World Wide Web turns 30 this year, and to celebrate three decades of utter chaos and brilliance, CERN developers and designers have created a version of the original WorldWideWeb browser that can run inside a modern browser. What, you wonder, is it like to surf the original web? Well, give it a try here. It’s kind of a pain! Read More >>

science
CERN Unveils Design for 62-Mile-Round Atom Smasher More Powerful Than the Large Hadron Collider

A scientific collaboration has released a concept design for the Large Hadron Collider’s successor, an enormous new experiment that would sit inside a hundred-kilometre (62-mile) tunnel. Read More >>

science
Why the Large Hadron Collider Is Shutting Down for Two Years

The Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest atom smasher, will be turned off for the next two years for upgrades. Hopefully, its particle-hunting abilities will be even better once it restarts in 2021. Read More >>

science
More Than 200 Physicists Denounce Sexist Lecture at CERN

A group of 19 physicists penned a statement denouncing the talk given last week by Italian physicist Alessandro Strumia at a workshop on women in high energy physics held at CERN in Switzerland. More than 200 physicists, including Nobel Prize winner David Gross and several prominent physicist-authors, and at least 850 academics from other fields, have signed the statement as of Friday morning. Read More >>

science
The Large Hadron Collider Turns 10: Here’s What’s Next for Particle Physics

Yesterday marked the 10th anniversary of when the Large Hadron Collider first powered on. Since it’s already achieved its most well-known goal—to discover the Higgs boson—you might wonder what else is happening at the famous collider. Read More >>

science
Physicists Achieve Incredible Electron-Accelerating Feat at Small Scale

Particle physics experiments are huge—they have to be, in order to accelerate particles with enough energy to properly study them. The Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland is nearly 17 miles around, while others are closer to the 2-mile range. But scientists working on a new experiment reported Wednesday that they’ve accelerated electrons to high energies in just 33 feet. Read More >>

science
The Large Hadron Collider Accelerated ‘Atoms’ With Electrons for the First Time

You can feasibly put anything inside the world’s largest physics experiment, CERN’s Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland, so long as it can be vaporised. You could even stick a sandwich in there. But for the first time, scientists have accelerated an atomic nucleus with electrons still attached. Read More >>

space
New Higgs Boson Discovery Could Help Solve Cosmic Puzzle

Scientists can’t take pictures of the Higgs boson. But they can find proof of its existence by watching “E=mc2” play out in hundreds of millions of particle collisions per second and detecting how it decays into other particles they do know how to spot. Now, six years after officially discovering the Higgs boson, particle physicists are announcing that they’ve spotted the Higgs in another way. Read More >>

science
Shuttered Experiment Shares New View of Ghostly Neutrinos’ Shape-Shifting Behaviour

Can we take a minute to appreciate just how weird neutrinos are? The second most abundant known particle in the universe passes right through most regular matter like a ghost—you get hit with around a quadrillion of them from the Sun every second. Not only that, but neutrinos can even change between three different identities. They are spooky as hell. Read More >>

science
Could the Large Hadron Collider Collide a Sandwich?

You’d be surprised at how many times someone has asked whether the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) could collide mundane things, like a sandwich. The answer is, not quite... but almost! It’s sort of a long story, and the explanation might surprise you. Read More >>

science
The Universe Is Not in Danger of Ending From a Higgs Boson Vacuum Bubble

There are few easier ways to get people to read your website than to scare them. That’s how we ended up with the media frenzy surrounding Tiangong-1, and it’s why InfoWars continues to exist. It’s also how we’ve ended up with folks telling you the universe is due to end. Heck, we’re guilty ourselves. Read More >>

science
CERN Researchers Think They Saw Rare Particle Decay That Could Lead to New Physics

An experiment at CERN in Geneva, called NA62, is designed to let scientists watch a rare kind of particle decay. The team, using a whole new method, may have finally spotted what they’re looking for. Read More >>

science
Scientists Will Transport Antimatter in a Truck

The antimatter of science fiction vastly differs from the real-life antimatter of particle physics. The former powers spaceships or bombs, while the latter is just another particle that physicists study, one that happens to be the mirror image with the opposite charge of the more familiar particles. Read More >>