science
Meet Dawn Shaughnessy, the Real-Life Alchemist Who Expanded the Periodic Table

The periodic table is chemistry’s holy text. Not only does it list all of the tools at chemists’ disposal, but its mere shape – where these elements fall into specific rows and columns – has made profound predictions about new elements and their properties that later came true. But few chemists on Earth have a closer relationship with the document than Dawn Shaughnessy, whose team is partially responsible for adding six new elements to table’s ranks. Read More >>

science
We Talked to the Graduate Student Who Made Bricks From Human Wee

Wee contains some pretty amazing stuff. Scientists have known for nearly a decade that it’s possible to produce bricks from bacteria, sand, and urea—a chemical found in urine. Researchers have gone ahead and produced those bricks, now for the first time with human wee. Read More >>

science
Most Commercial Graphene Is Just Expensive Pencil Lead, New Study Finds

You might wonder why, given all the hype, there isn’t graphene in every product you own yet. Well, a new study has found that 60 companies that claim to sell the Nobel prize-winning ultra-thin carbon sheets produce utter trash. Read More >>

science
The Nobel Prize in Chemistry Goes to Scientists Who Used Evolution to Create Safer Chemicals and New Drugs

A trio of scientists from the US and the UK have won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry this year for using evolution to their advantage, developing new methods of creating molecules that have already helped us produce safer, greener chemicals and new drugs. Read More >>

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Someone Seems to Have Finally Made a Highlighter That Won’t Smear Your Notes

They seem like a mundane piece of stationery, just one of hundreds of tools helping you to get through college, but apparently there's still some advanced research being done in the field of highlighters, resulting in what seems to be the first markers that won't smear notes written in pen. Read More >>

science
World’s Oldest Cheese, Found in Ancient Tomb, Was Also Very Dangerous

Humans have been producing and consuming cheese for a very long time, as the recent discovery of 3,200-year-old cheese in an ancient Egyptian tomb attests. Delicious though this cheese may have been, it was also a potential source of disease. Read More >>

science
Scientists Harvest Hydrogen from Water in Microgravity, a Nifty Trick for Deep-Space Travel

A team of scientists announced they have harvested hydrogen from water in microgravity – a proof-of-principle test that may one day lead to a way to acquire fuel or other resources during a long-distance, crewed space mission. Read More >>

science
Earth Has Many More Rivers and Streams Than We Thought, New Satellite Study Finds

Rivers and streams cover much more of the planet than geologists previously estimated, according to a new study published in Science. In total, this new estimate shows that, excluding land with glaciers, Earth is covered by just under 300,000 square miles (773,000 square kilometres) of rivers and streams. That’s more square footage than the state of Texas, and it’s as much as 44 percent higher than previous counts. Read More >>

space
The Discovery of Complex Organic Molecules on Saturn’s Moon Enceladus Is a Huge Deal

Using data collected by NASA’s late-great Cassini space probe, scientists have detected traces of complex organic molecules seeping out from Enceladus’ ice-covered ocean. It’s yet another sign that this intriguing Saturnian moon has what it takes to sustain life. Read More >>

history
Scientists Match Pollution in Greenland’s Ice Sheet to Events from Ancient Greece and Rome

We tend to associate industrial pollution with the modern era, but human civilisations have been contaminating the planet for thousands of years. By drilling deep into Greenland’s ice sheet, an interdisciplinary team of researchers has chronicled the industrial waste produced by the ancient Greeks and Romans over a 1,900-year period, linking pollution to economic booms, wars, and even plagues. Read More >>

science
Lunar Meteorite Found in Africa Points to Ice Beneath the Moon’s Surface

Good news, future lunar colonists! Scientists have discovered traces of moganite in a lunar meteorite that was discovered 13 years ago in Africa. This mineral requires ice to form, so its discovery is being taken as potential confirmation that frozen water exists beneath the Moon’s dusty surface. Read More >>

nasa
NASA’s Mini Fission Reactor Could Help Humans Survive on Mars, and It Just Cleared Early Tests

NASA announced today that it has completed tests of its Kilopower portable nuclear fission reactor, a device designed to one day power bases on Mars or the moon. The tests met or exceeded expectations on all metrics, which means the device can now go on to more serious flight testing. Read More >>

science
Here’s How Scientists Bent Diamonds

A team of physicists has figured out how to bend diamonds, according to a new paper. Okay, we’re talking about nano-scale diamond needles here. But it’s an impressive feat, because while diamonds are known for their hardness, these rocks will break if they are bent even a tiny bit. Read More >>

science
Diamonds Found Packed Inside Rare Meteorite Are Evidence of a Destroyed Planet

Back in 2008, an 80-tonne meteor exploded over the Nubian Desert of Sudan, showering the region with hundreds of tiny rocks. New research suggests the diamonds packed inside these meteorites could have only formed within a planetary body the size of Mercury or Mars—a planet that no longer exists. Read More >>

science
Do You Want to Eat This New Caffeine-Catalysed Gel as Much as I Do?

Finally, scientists have delivered exactly what you’ve been asking for: an edible polymer gel made with caffeine. Finally. Read More >>