science
The Amazon Forest Fires Are a Form of ‘Genocide’

When Richard Pearshouse visited indigenous communities in the Brazilian Amazon in April to investigate illegal deforestation, he heard countless horrors of land grabbers directly threatening and intimidating people. One story, however, really stuck with the head of environment and crisis with Amnesty International: a 22-year-old mother who finally lulled her children to sleep despite the sound of nearby gunfire only to find herself suffering the same insomniac fate. She was so scared, she couldn’t sleep. Read More >>

climate
At Least 22 Dead, More Than a Million Reported Displaced as Typhoon Lekima Makes Landfall in Eastern China

At least 22 deaths have been reported, and more than a million have been forced to leave their homes after Typhoon Lekima smashed into China near Wenling in southeastern Zhejiang province, between Taiwan and Shanghai, the BBC reported on Saturday. Read More >>

science
Hot Pavement is More Dangerous Than You Realise

Doctors at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas are warning about a less-recognised danger of summer heat: pavement burns. Their recent study suggests that people in hot places can end up in the hospital with serious burn injuries caused by contact with sizzling pavement. Read More >>

science
Aeroplane Contrails Have Surprising Effect on the Atmosphere

The climate impact of flying isn’t just about carbon emissions. The contrails that aeroplanes create also influence the temperature of our atmosphere – and a new study finds that impact is set to grow in a big way. Read More >>

science
Scientists Just Installed the World’s Highest Weather Station in Mount Everest’s ‘Death Zone’

Scientists announced on Thursday that they successfully installed five automated stations, including the highest weather station in world, on Mount Everest’s flank. At 27,658 feet (8,430 meters) above sea level, the station is set to record some of the harshest weather anywhere on Earth. And with a satellite connection, anyone can monitor the weather in Mount Everest’s so-called death zone – where there isn’t enough oxygen to sustain human life for long – in real time. Read More >>

conservation
World’s Oldest Rainforest Is Being Cooked to Death by Climate Change, Authorities Warn

Australia can’t seem to catch a break. The Great Barrier reef is still limping along after being ravaged by heat waves two to three years ago, while the people of Australia just sweated through their hottest summer on record. Now, authorities are warning that the endless heat has placed a world-class rainforest in grave danger. Read More >>

science
The Northern Hemisphere Just Experienced Its First-Ever Category 5 Cyclone in February

We’ve seen a lot of weird-ass tropical cyclones in recent years. This week, we can add another one to the list. Read More >>

science
Record-Setting Ice Hole Drilled in Antarctica

Using a hot-water drill, British scientists have dug a 7,060-foot borehole through the Antarctic ice sheet. The comically long ice hole is the largest ever for West Antarctica, and it’s meant to improve our understanding of climate-related sea level rise. Read More >>

environment
Antarctic Sea Ice Is In Record-Low Territory Again, and Nobody Knows Why

What’s happening to Arctic sea ice is pretty straightforward: Earth is getting warmer, and everything’s melting. But on the other side of the planet, things are more complicated, as evidenced by the latest Antarctic sea ice slump that has scientists scratching their heads. Read More >>

science
The Scientists Who Play With Wildfire

When fire scientist Albert Simeoni wants to study wildfires, he can’t exactly run into the nearest blaze with sensors and data collection tools. It’s simply too dangerous and these conflagrations, though they’re becoming more frequent and intense with climate change, aren’t predictable enough to research in the controlled manner that science demands. Read More >>

environment
Meet the Activists Who Walked Over 900 Miles to the UN Climate Talks

Joanna Sustento lost her parents, oldest brother, sister-in-law, and 3-year-old nephew to Super Typhoon Haiyan in 2013. More than 6,000 others died, too. That storm was her first real taste of what climate change would look like for her people in the Philippines. Read More >>

environment
Government Climate Committee Says Let’s Go Back to Being a Nice Forest

Maybe we should stop trying to compete with the world and go back to eating things that hang low down on trees is the sort-of conclusion reached by the UK's official governmental Committee on Climate Change, which actually says we should put the brakes on agriculture and double our efforts to reforest the land. Read More >>

ice on thin ice
Scientists Discover a Weird Noise Coming From Antarctic Ice Shelf

The Antarctic is no stranger to weird sounds, from ancient trapped air bubbles popping to entire ice sheets disintegrating. Now we can add another freaky track to the ouevre of icy masterpieces. Read More >>

science
Bacteria Floating 30,000 Feet Overhead Could Be Influencing the Weather

We humans tend to pride ourselves on our ability to adapt, but bacteria have been beating us at this game for billions of years. Our microbial brethren have carved out a niche in some of Earth’s most hostile environments, from deep sea vents to Antarctic lakes. Some hardy bugs can even survive in an upper layer of our atmosphere called the stratosphere—where a recent paper suggests they may have the ability to impact our weather, our crops, and even our health. Read More >>

science
The Earth’s Memory Is Locked in Ancient Seafloor Muck

The Earth does not forget. Meteor impacts, nuclear detonations, Ice Ages, earthquakes: The memories of them all are imprinted in the muck at the bottom of the ocean. Read More >>