science
The Northern Hemisphere Just Experienced Its First-Ever Category 5 Cyclone in February

We’ve seen a lot of weird-ass tropical cyclones in recent years. This week, we can add another one to the list. Read More >>

science
Record-Setting Ice Hole Drilled in Antarctica

Using a hot-water drill, British scientists have dug a 7,060-foot borehole through the Antarctic ice sheet. The comically long ice hole is the largest ever for West Antarctica, and it’s meant to improve our understanding of climate-related sea level rise. Read More >>

environment
Antarctic Sea Ice Is In Record-Low Territory Again, and Nobody Knows Why

What’s happening to Arctic sea ice is pretty straightforward: Earth is getting warmer, and everything’s melting. But on the other side of the planet, things are more complicated, as evidenced by the latest Antarctic sea ice slump that has scientists scratching their heads. Read More >>

science
The Scientists Who Play With Wildfire

When fire scientist Albert Simeoni wants to study wildfires, he can’t exactly run into the nearest blaze with sensors and data collection tools. It’s simply too dangerous and these conflagrations, though they’re becoming more frequent and intense with climate change, aren’t predictable enough to research in the controlled manner that science demands. Read More >>

environment
Meet the Activists Who Walked Over 900 Miles to the UN Climate Talks

Joanna Sustento lost her parents, oldest brother, sister-in-law, and 3-year-old nephew to Super Typhoon Haiyan in 2013. More than 6,000 others died, too. That storm was her first real taste of what climate change would look like for her people in the Philippines. Read More >>

environment
Government Climate Committee Says Let’s Go Back to Being a Nice Forest

Maybe we should stop trying to compete with the world and go back to eating things that hang low down on trees is the sort-of conclusion reached by the UK's official governmental Committee on Climate Change, which actually says we should put the brakes on agriculture and double our efforts to reforest the land. Read More >>

ice on thin ice
Scientists Discover a Weird Noise Coming From Antarctic Ice Shelf

The Antarctic is no stranger to weird sounds, from ancient trapped air bubbles popping to entire ice sheets disintegrating. Now we can add another freaky track to the ouevre of icy masterpieces. Read More >>

science
Bacteria Floating 30,000 Feet Overhead Could Be Influencing the Weather

We humans tend to pride ourselves on our ability to adapt, but bacteria have been beating us at this game for billions of years. Our microbial brethren have carved out a niche in some of Earth’s most hostile environments, from deep sea vents to Antarctic lakes. Some hardy bugs can even survive in an upper layer of our atmosphere called the stratosphere—where a recent paper suggests they may have the ability to impact our weather, our crops, and even our health. Read More >>

science
The Earth’s Memory Is Locked in Ancient Seafloor Muck

The Earth does not forget. Meteor impacts, nuclear detonations, Ice Ages, earthquakes: The memories of them all are imprinted in the muck at the bottom of the ocean. Read More >>

science
Diseased Ocean Microbes Could Be Messing With the Weather

Our oceans are brimming with microscopic phytoplankton—plant-like organisms that contribute significantly to marine diversity. Tiny though they are, these sea critters, when infected with a particular virus, may influence atmospheric processes such as cloud formation, according to new research. Read More >>

uncategorized
Scientists Just Measured the Drought that May Have Brought Down the Ancient Maya

The ancient Maya were an innovative people. They constructed intricate cities throughout the tropical lowlands of the Yucatán Peninsula, communicated using one of the world’s first written languages, and created two calendar systems by studying the stars. But despite their achievements, the thriving Mayan civilisation mysteriously collapsed sometime between the eighth and ninth centuries. We still don’t know exactly why. Read More >>

science
How a Dust Plume Turned the Sun Red 

On 16 October last year, the Sun turned red over London and other southern parts of the UK. People across the country documented the strange phenomenon on social media. Read More >>

science
A Recent Hurricane Shot a Bolt of Antimatter Toward Earth

When you think of an alien world, you might think of a strange, stormy place with an inhospitable environment, frequent lightning strikes, and extreme radiation. But who needs an imagination when the storms here on Earth already beam radiation, including antimatter, down toward the ground? Read More >>

science
Are Jupiter and Venus Messing With Earth’s Climate?

Our planet is in a remarkably circular orbit around the Sun, but as new research points out, Earth’s orbit sometimes experiences a slight jolt, thanks to the combined gravitational influence of Jupiter and Venus. Incredibly, this cycle has been going on for at least 215 million years — and one scientist suggests it could possibly have influenced the trajectory of life on this planet, according to the new study published yesterday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read More >>

australia
Australia Hits Worst Greenhouse Gas Emissions on Record

Australia’s finally done it! A new NDEVR Environmental analysis shows Australia has never been emitting more greenhouse gas when unreliable estimates for land use-related emissions are excluded, the Guardian reported on Sunday. Over the past year, Australia released an estimated 138.78 metric tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent in greenhouse gases. The last quarter measured was the second highest since 2011, even though Australia has invested heavily in wind power plants in the intermediary years. Read More >>