science
The World’s Second-Largest Rainforest is Losing the Carbon It’s Held for a Thousand Years

The Congo Basin is the second-largest rainforest on Earth, and like most tropical forests, it’s getting chewed up by humans. That’s a problem for the climate, and not just because trees are a natural sponge helping to mop up humanity’s ever-rising carbon emissions. New research suggests that as trees are replaced with fields for agriculture, carbon that’s been locked up in the Congo’s soils for hundreds to thousands of years is starting to seep out. Read More >>

animals
Congo’s Civil War Has Practically Wiped Out the World’s Largest Gorilla

The largest great apes on Earth have suffered a “catastrophic” population collapse over the past twenty years, according to a report published by the Wildlife Conservation Society. Grauer’s gorilla, a subspecies found only in the lawless eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, is a victim of the same brutal civil war that claimed up to six million human lives from 1996 to 2003. Read More >>

drones
Even the UN is Using Drones to Spy on People Now

The United Nations now has its own drone program. Its first unmanned aircraft took off earlier this week in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Joining some 87 countries with the capability, the organisation says it's just keeping up with the world's technological advances. Read More >>

environment
The Congo Mines That Supply “Conflict Minerals” For the World’s Gadgets

Most people who own a smartphone—or a laptop, or a new car—aren’t familiar with tantalum, the rare, blue-grey metal that conducts electricity through these devices. But thanks to skyrocketing demand from electronics makers, tantalum—along with a handful of other rare minerals—is an incredibly sought-after metal. And it’s fuelling the ongoing conflict in Congo. Read More >>

uncategorized
Infrared Film Can Make Even a Warzone Look Beautiful

What you're looking at isn't a landscape shot photoshopped to resemble Willy Wonka's realm—it's the real world. A battlefield. Photographer Richard Mosse traveled the wartorn Congo with infrared film made for camouflage detection. The results are gorgeous. Read More >>