science
Male Tortoises Mysteriously Stop Boning

There are only a few things in this life animals really have to do. They have to eat, they have to shit, and they have to bang. So when conservation biologists transplant a bunch of wild animals in order to save them, but half of them stop getting laid as a result, it’s cause for concern. Read More >>

animals
Adorable New Elfin Toad Is Straight Out of Middle-Earth

Far up in the Langbian Plateau in southern Vietnam, a dense, dark forest gently breathes with a passing breeze. Billowing fog continually invades and shrouds the canopy. Thick, verdant moss blankets every rock and tree, and the landscape weeps with trickling rivulets of water. This gorgeous setting feels like it could host any number of magical beasts, and now, a team of researchers has revealed a new woodland creature that looks particularly at home. Behold, the elfin mountain toad. Read More >>

music
Björk Says She’s ‘Tinder For Technology’ – And She’s Right

We've heard lots of things described as 'Tinder for...' or 'Uber for...' but never a person. Until now: innovative musician Björk says she's "a matchmaker app" between tech and music. And it actually makes a lot of sense. Read More >>

nature
Elephant Herd Rescued After Harrowing Ordeal in Mud Trap

Late last week, 11 Asian elephants at Cambodia’s Keo Seima Wildlife Sanctuary ambled into a mud-filled bomb crater that dates back to the Vietnam War. Unable to get out, and with the mud quickly drying, the elephants’ situation become dire — prompting conservation officials to spring into action. Read More >>

environment
India and New Zealand Were Wrong to Recognise Rivers as Persons

Courts in New Zealand and India have granted legal personhood status to three rivers. The strange status is meant to protect the waters from pollution, but the measure could lead to unintended consequences, while undermining efforts to grant personhood status to living beings who actually deserve it. Read More >>

animals
Zoos Are So Afraid of Poachers They’re Starting to Cut the Horns Off Their Rhinos

A Czech zoo has decided to remove the horns of 18 white rhinos after a deadly attack last week at a French zoo where poachers shot a rhino and used a chainsaw to cut off its horns. Welcome to the new normal, where even zoo animals have to be mutilated to protect them from poaching. Read More >>

environment
Cruise Ship Smashes Into One of the World’s Most Beautiful Coral Reefs

A popular diving site filled with spectacular coral reefs has been severely damaged in West Papua, New Guinea, after a British-owned cruise ship got caught in low tide and slammed into it. It could take years for the reefs, a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site, to bounce back, and local officials want the company to pay for the damage. Read More >>

animals
Wild Boars Remain at Radiation-Hit Fukushima as Residents Prepare to Return

In just a few weeks, the residents of a Fukushima city will finally be allowed to return to their homes. Trouble is, the place has been overrun by hundreds of belligerent and potentially radioactive wild boars, prompting public safety concerns. Read More >>

wtf
Poachers Killing a Rhino in a Zoo is Some Pretty Dark Shit

Last night, poachers broke into a French zoo, shot a rare white rhinoceros, and used a chainsaw to saw off its prized horn. Officials say it’s the first attack of its kind in a European zoo. Read More >>

animals
These Newly Discovered Frogs Are Adorable And Already in Peril

While frogs haven’t traditionally been revered for their cuteness, a stunning new discovery could be a game-changer for all of ribbit-kind: According to a study published this week in PeerJ, scientists have discovered seven new frog species belonging to the genus Nyctibatrachus, commonly known as Night Frogs. Four of them are alarmingly tiny—in fact, they’re thought to be some of the smallest frogs in all of India, where they were found. Read More >>

energy
Spills From Fracking Are Worse Than We Imagined

An alarming new study has identified 6,600 chemical spills related to hydraulic fracturing in just four US states over a ten year period. The finding shows that fracking is far messier than previously assumed, and that stricter safety measures need to be established and enforced. Read More >>

animals
Africa’s Elusive Forest Elephants Are Being Poached at a Staggering Rate

Image: Thomas Breuer/PLoS
The population of forest elephants in Gabon’s Minkébé National Park—one of Central Africa’s largest and most important nature preserves—has declined by a whopping 81.5 per cent since 2004 due to poaching. It’s considered a major setback for the preservation of this endangered species, of which less than 100,000 remain in the wild. Read More >>

conservation
Watch Bison Return to a Canadian National Park for the First Time in 140 Years

After years of planning, a herd of wild bison has been re-introduced to Banff National Park in Alberta. Conservationists say it’s an important first step that could influence similar efforts elsewhere. Read More >>

animals
The World’s Largest Legal Ivory Market Is Shutting Down

In what is being hailed a major victory for elephant conservation, China has announced that it will ban all commercial ivory trading by the end of 2017. Read More >>

environment
The US Finally Admitted That Fracking Contaminates Drinking Water

A new report by the US Environmental Protection Agency concludes that hydraulic fracturing is capable of contaminating drinking water at virtually every stage in the process. The admission won’t sit well with the Tories or US President-elect Donald Trump, both of whom have vowed to expand the controversial practice. Read More >>