science
Ice Cores Could Solve Thousand-Year-Old Cosmic Ray Mystery

New evidence confirms that an influx of cosmic rays struck the entire planet around 994 CE—and it might solve the mystery of the event’s origin. Read More >>

space
See the South Pole Message That Alerted Astronomers to the Cosmic-Ray-Spewing Blazar

On Thursday, scientists made a huge announcement: Telescopes around the world recorded a source of mysterious, ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, the highest-energy particles that hit the Earth. It all started with a text message. Read More >>

science
Cosmic Ray Mystery Finally Cracked Thanks to Supermassive Black Hole Beaming Energy Straight at Earth

Every so often, protons and even entire atomic nuclei strike the Earth with extremely high energies—much higher than what scientists can produce in their most powerful physics experiments. Since the discovery of “cosmic rays” a hundred years ago, no one knew for sure where the most energetic of these particles came from—until now. Read More >>

space
Pluto Isn’t the Only Thing New Horizons is Studying

New Horizons has been sending back some incredible information about Pluto, but the Dwarf planet isn’t the only thing it’s been studying. NASA recently noted that the spacecraft’s vantage point is ideal for studying Solar Wind, and it’s been doing just that. Read More >>

history
Cosmic Rays Could Help Unlock the Secrets of the Pyramids

There’s a long and colourful history of people trying to unlock the secret of how the Egyptian pyramids were built — and possibly find hidden rooms and corridors, for good measure. And now, a new international project aims to peer through the stone walls of these ancient structures, using cosmic rays. Read More >>

space
Your Phone Could Become Part of the World’s Largest Telescope

If you could enlist your smartphone to become part of an earth-sized telescope searching for the source of cosmic rays, would you? Researchers at University of California are hoping you'd say yes—they've developed an app that will leverage the power of one million smartphone cameras to answer one of the great questions about our universe. Read More >>

science
The Plan to Make the Moon an Enormous Detector of Cosmic Rays

About once a century on any given square kilometre of Earth, a cosmic ray hits with mind-boggling intensity. The teeny tiny subatomic particle from space comes careening in with more than 10 million times the energy of particles shot out by the LHC. Where do these ultrahigh energy cosmic rays come from? Astronomers have a plan to find out, using the moon and a massive new radio telescope array. Read More >>