intel
Intel’s 10th Generation is Confusing as Hell

Today Intel announced its new line up of 10th generation U- and Y-series CPUs. This is exciting stuff! Wait. Didn’t Intel already announce its new line up of 10th generation U- and Y-series CPUs in May? Yes, it did. But it also announced a second 10th generation of U and Y series CPUs today, and you are totally welcomed to be confused by that and what it all means, as I’ve been. Read More >>

computing
We Tested Intel’s Ice Lake i7 CPU, and It Packs a Pleasant Surprise

Intel’s Ice Lake processors aren’t on the market just yet, but after five years of teasing and delays, Intel put the upcoming 10nm CPUs in the hands of journalists last week. The company claims this generation of processors will help redefine “what’s possible in a thin and light laptop”—specifically, we’re supposed to see significant improvements in battery life, thermal performance, and speed. We couldn’t test out those first two claims, but we got the opportunity to test the latter one, and while the speed bumps we recorded for processor-intensive tasks weren’t by any means shocking, the GPU improvements seem pretty extraordinary. Read More >>

apple
The New Updated 8-Core MacBook Pro is Apple’s Fastest Laptop Yet

When Intel announced a new line of 9th-gen CPUs a few weeks ago, it was sort of expected that those processors would find their way into a wide range of new and refreshed laptops like those from Asus and Razer. However, since Apple sometimes skips over entire generations of silicon, being able to get those chips in a new MacBook wasn’t exactly a sure thing. Read More >>

huawei
ARM Reportedly Directs Staff to Stop Working with Huawei, Leaving Company In Awkward Position

After the Trump administration placed Huawei on the U.S. Entity List due to concerns that Huawei poses a national security risk, that meant Huawei would be banned from buying products from U.S. tech organisations including big names such as Google, Qualcomm, Intel, and others. Read More >>

computing
Intel’s 5GHz i9 Processor Is Incredible for Hype and Pretty Good for Computing, Too 

The product categories in the CPU marketplace are rapidly eroding. Intel and AMD have spent the last year and a half furiously releasing new products, and tweaking their lines to take on the competition. In some cases prices have been slashed. In others, it’s meant CPUs have had more cores or threads packed in. The result is a murky marketplace with no clear winners or losers, just a lot of CPUs that go real fast. Read More >>

apple
iPhone XS Guts Report: How Fast Is the A12 Processor, and How Good Is the Battery Life?

We’ve been using the iPhone XS for exactly two weeks now. It is unsurprisingly a great phone – the best iPhone that’s ever been made, despite a smattering of complaints and issues that have cropped up. Now, after two weeks of testing, here’s a closer look at the phone’s processor and battery. Read More >>

amd
AMD’s 16-Core Beast Creams Intel, but You Might Be Better Off Without It

I won’t lie, when AMD’s new 16-core monster CPU, the Ryzen Threadripper 2950X, arrived, I ran around the office showing off it and its accompanying air cooler to anyone who would make eye contact with me. The thing is enormous—easily twice as large as a standard desktop CPU from Intel. The air cooler, saddled with the goofy name Wraith Ripper and festooned with LED lighting, is larger than most power supplies, and if dropped, it could do damage to floors, feet, and small woodland creatures. Even people who know nothing about computers were suitably impressed by these enormous pieces of PC. Then they’d ask how much the Threadripper 2950X cost. Read More >>

apple
Why Apple’s Best MacBook Pro is Too Powerful for Its Own Good

After being long overdue for an update to new CPUs, last week Apple announced refreshed 2018 MacBook Pros with 8th-gen Coffee Lake chips from Intel, including the company’s top-of-the-line consumer laptop processor, the six-core 2.9GHz Core i9-8950HK CPU. And in theory, this option seemed like a great addition to the MBP lineup by giving high-level video editors and graphics artists a little extra performance without any added bulk. Read More >>

amd
Inside AMD’s Quest to Build Chips That Can Beat Intel

There are few gambles in the tech world as big spending billions to build a new computer processor from scratch. Former AMD board member Robert Palmer supposedly compared it to Russian roulette: “You put a gun to your head, pull the trigger, and find out four years later if you blew your brains out.” Six years ago AMD loaded the gun and pulled the trigger, dramatically restructuring itself internally in a mad bid to escape a disaster of its own making. Now we’ve seen the results and instead of dying, AMD has a savvy new CPU microarchitecture, Zen, that’s the foundation of the shockingly good new series of Ryzen processors. They’re so good, in fact, that they could pose a real challenge to Intel’s incumbent dominance and change what the computer market looks for the next few years. Read More >>

intel
It Doesn’t Look Like Spectre and Meltdown Really Hurt Intel at All

When the Spectre and Meltdown security vulnerabilities were made public earlier this year, things were a mess. Practically every Intel processor made in the last decade had backdoors that potentially let normal programs and software access what are supposed to be protected areas of a CPU’s kernel. Read More >>

amd
Our First Look at AMD’s Second-Generation Ryzen CPU Is Proof It’s No One Hit Wonder

Last year AMD finally gave us something we desperately needed with the release of Ryzen: A viable rival to Intel in the CPU space. The rivalry has meant faster CPUs for desktops and laptops as each company races to surpass the other, but there’s a potential problem for AMD. It doesn’t have the same track record for improved performance as Intel. In the past it’s stumbled, barely keeping pace with its larger competitor. If competition is going to be sustained—if we’re going to have long term competition that drives down prices and puts faster chips in our computers, then even a minor architecture change from AMD needs to have big and speedy results. The second generation of Ryzen does. Read More >>

facebook
Is Facebook Planning to Build Its Own Chips to Create Better AI?

If there are two things Facebook is notoriously bad at right now, it’s maintaining the privacy of its users and developing cool Facebook-related hardware. Yet, according to a new job posting first noticed by Bloomberg, Facebook may start taking hardware a lot more seriously. Read More >>

apple
What’s Really Going On With Apple and Intel? A Guide to the Speculation

On Monday Bloomberg News dropped a bombshell report. By 2020, it claimed Apple will stop using Intel CPUs in its computers. Just picture it: The third-largest PC maker in the world might one day leave behind the biggest computer chip maker. Read More >>

reviews
Rivals Intel And AMD Got Together And Made Something Beautiful For Gamers

After Intel’s very bad last few months and AMD’s very good last few months, it seemed awfully confusing that the two rival CPU makers would team up for a new chip. Sure it was all good for AMD—who is riding high on the success of its new Ryzen CPUs and Vega GPUs—but Intel has spent the last few months in the hot seat courtesy of the Meltdown and Spectre security fiasco. Every CPU the company makes, including the one reviewed here, is vulnerable without a patch. Fortunately, the new Intel 8th-gen CPU with integrated AMD Vega graphics is so fast you can almost forgive the fact it had to be patched to be secure. Read More >>

intel
Researchers Find New Ways to Exploit Meltdown and Spectre Vulnerabilities in Modern CPUs

In the past few weeks, the entire information security industry has grown very anxious about Meltdown and Spectre, two classes of exploits that can be used to manipulate vulnerabilities in the way many varieties of modern processors (but especially Intel ones) handle a performance-improving technique called speculative execution and extract hidden system data. While numerous platforms have rushed to roll out patches, and Meltdown appears to be less of an issue than Spectre, it’s still unclear just how badly this situation could go. Read More >>