geology
A Massive Impact Crater Has Been Detected Beneath Greenland’s Ice Sheet

An unusually large asteroid crater measuring 19 miles wide has been discovered under a continental ice sheet in Greenland. Roughly the size of Paris, it’s now among the 25 biggest asteroid craters on Earth. Read More >>

science
Hundreds of Giant Seafloor Craters Produced By Explosive Methane Farts

Researchers working in the Barents Sea have discovered hundreds of craters on the Arctic Sea floor, some measuring over a kilometre in width. These craters, which date back to the end of the last Ice Age, were formed when large reserves of methane exploded in the wake of retreating ice sheets. Because methane is a potent greenhouse gas, this discovery is a potential warning of things to come in our warming world. Read More >>

science
Bursting Balloons in a Sand Pit Reveals the Origins of Mysterious Crater

When we think of craters, asteroid collisions are often what come to mind. But now, thanks to scientists who exploded balloons in a sand pit, we have a better idea of other ways craters can be formed, like underground methane explosions, for instance. Read More >>

science
Planetary Scientists are Officially Done Finding Craters on Earth

Science is meant to be an unceasing, always-sceptical search for knowledge, so it’s not often that scientists can call it a day, declare a problem all scienced out, and move on. But that’s exactly what the team counting asteroid craters on Earth are doing. Read More >>

science
The Plan to Drill Into the Crater From the Dinosaur-Killing Meteorite 

Sixty-five million years ago, a meteorite crashed into Earth, leaving a huge crater on the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. The impact is likely responsible for killing off the most of the dinosaurs, along with 75 per cent of all species on Earth. Scientists are now planning an expedition to drill into the middle of the crater. Read More >>

uncategorized
NASA on Mercury’s Craters: “Anyone Else Think This Looks Like the Cookie Monster?”

The Messenger spacecraft has photographed some neat craters on Mercury's surface and NASA thinks they look like the cookie monster. What kind of magic cookies are you eating, NASA? Hmmm, wait. I think they are right. Read More >>