science
Scientists Just Melted a Hole Through 3,500 Feet of Ice to Reach a Mysterious Antarctic Lake

While you were stuffing your face with mince pies and bingeing Netflix shows over Christmas, a team of about 50 scientists, drillers, and support staff was attempting to punch through nearly 4,000 feet of ice to access an Antarctic subglacial lake for just the second time in human history. And folks, they did it. Read More >>

science
New Study Shows Just How Frighteningly Fast Greenland Is Melting

In July 2012, a spate of warm weather caused nearly the entire surface of the Greenland ice sheet to begin melting, an event with no precedent in the satellite record. A new study shows this massive melt-out wasn’t just an anomaly compared with the last 40 years, but the last 350. Unfortunately, the study also suggests 2012 could be a harbinger of our new normal. Read More >>

environment
The West Antarctic Ice Sheet Is Wasting Away Very Quickly

On an forbidding shoreline at the bottom of the world, the prodigious ice sheets of West Antarctica dead-end in the Amundsen sea. For decades, scientists have been monitoring this interface of rock, ice and ocean, in order to understand how quickly it’ll retreat as the planet warms up. A new study shows that three of the Amundsen sea’s frozen gateways are melting away faster than we realised, raising the spectre of an ice sheet collapse that could trigger several feet of global sea level rise. Read More >>

environment
Dramatic Visualisations Show Just How Quickly the Arctic Is Melting

On September 10th, the Arctic hit its annual summertime ice minimum. According to the National Snow and Ice Data Center, it was the second lowest summertime low since satellite record-keeping began. And as a series of new visualisations show, this trend is not going anywhere. Read More >>

science
This Year’s Record Arctic Melt Is a Problem For Everybody

If your life has felt like a hot mess this year, you’re not alone. Same goes for the Arctic, which month after month has seen its ice cover contract to new lows. By late September, Arctic sea ice may reach its lowest extent since satellite record-keeping began. Read More >>