science
A Breakthrough in 3D Printing Liquids Could Lead to Squishy, Flexible Gadgets

The most common types of 3D printing involve either extruding melted plastic or using a laser to solidify tiny particles, layer by layer, to slowly build up a solid object. But researchers at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have found a way to radically change that process by 3D printing liquids inside other liquids—and it could mean major advancements in gadget construction. Read More >>

news
Tunnel Collapses at Nuclear Facility Once Called ‘an Underground Chernobyl Waiting to Happen’

Managers at the Hanford Site in Washington State told workers to “take cover” Tuesday morning after a tunnel leading to a massive plutonium finishing plant collapsed. The emergency is especially worrisome, since Hanford is commonly known as “the most toxic place in America,” with one former governor calling it “an underground Chernobyl waiting to happen.” Worrisome might actually be an understatement. Read More >>

nuclear weapons
How America’s Secret Nuke Police Hunted For Dirty Bombs in the 1970s

Bomb threats have been a part of American life since at least the 19th century. But in the 1970s the types of threats shifted dramatically. The people making bomb threats in the US started to claim their bombs had nuclear materials. By 1975, the US started a new task force to deal with the threats, and we at Gizmodo got our hands on a film that explains what this secret group of nuke-hunting police did. Read More >>

tv
Documents Reveal Stranger Things Really Freaked Out the US Department of Energy

Netflix’s runaway hit Stranger Things did a lot of things right, and chief among them: antagonising the US Department of Energy. Read More >>

collection
20 Images of Atomic Age Infrastructure

This year, we saw top-secret photos of the birth of the atom bomb finally declassified. The photos of how the US government used that technology after World War II are just as interesting. Read More >>