big diamonds
Miner Finds Enormous 706-Carat Diamond, Promptly Hands it Over to the Government

A pastor and independent miner in Sierra Leone has unearthed an uncut 706-carat diamond estimated to be worth tens of millions of dollars. The pastor turned the diamond over to the government in hopes that the proceeds from its sale will help the impoverished nation. But given the history of this former “blood-diamond” nation, what happens from here is anyone’s guess. Read More >>

onkyo
Forgetting a £80,000 Pair of Diamond-Saturated Headphones on a Plane Would Be Tragic

Thanks to Onkyo, throwing on a pair of fancy rose gold Beats headphones is no longer a status symbol. Compared to Onkyo’s new Diamond Headphones which will be available — to a select few — for somewhere around £80,000, those rose gold ear goggles you were so proud of might as well be just another boring pair of white iPhone earbuds. Read More >>

money
The World’s Largest Blue Diamond is Up for Sale (If You Have £31 Million)

Fancy treating yourself? The world’s largest ever blue diamond is going up for auction on May 18th at Christie’s in Geneva. But you better have a healthy bank balance: It’s expected to sell for somewhere in the region of $45 million (£31.3m) Read More >>

environment
An Obscure African Plant Grows Only Over Rock That Could Hide Diamonds

Diamonds you’re familiar with. Pandanus candelabrum, not so much. And until recently, botanists didn’t pay much attention to this rare, palm-like plant from West Africa either. But the discovery that P. candelabrum grows only over rock that may harbour diamonds has vaulted the plant out of obscurity. Read More >>

science
Scientists Use World’s Largest Laser to Recreate Jupiter’s Core

It is not pleasant inside the core of Jupiter—or any other planet for that matter. However, gaining a better understanding of what's going on in there is key for understanding how these planets form. That's why a team of scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recently used diamonds and lasers to recreate those very conditions. Read More >>

photography
The Nearly Mile-Wide Diamond Mine That Helped Build the Soviet Union

Building empires takes money. And building industrial empires takes diamonds, not just for cash, but for the machines and tools that need them to operate. In a remote corner of Siberia, the Mir diamond mine was responsible for funnelling diamonds into building the USSR—and it left behind a pit that stretches almost a mile across the surface of the Earth. Read More >>

science
Researchers Develop a Way to X-Ray Rocks to Find Hidden Diamonds

It's no surprise that the diamond industry is willing to spend whatever it takes to make the process of mining precious gems even more profitable. And while it already relies on X-ray technology for spotting diamonds on the surface of mined ore, researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute's Development Center for X-ray Technology EZRT have developed a way to now spot them buried inside rocks. Read More >>

science
Researchers Found a New, Easy Way to Turn Graphite Into Diamond

Since graphite—the dark material used in regular old pencils—and diamonds are both made from carbon, it's technically feasible to turn the former into the latter. You just need to apply a little pressure—about 150,000 times what the atmosphere on Earth's surface is like. But researchers at Stanford University claim to have found a shortcut. Read More >>

how to
How to Tell Real Diamonds From Fake

The jewellery market has been flooded with synthetic stones over the last several years; not just lab-grown gems but flat-out fakes. Here's how to tell if your rock is the real McCoy and not just a shiny bauble. Read More >>

science
This is the Oldest Fragment of Earth Ever Found

You're looking at the oldest fragment of Earth ever found: a zircon 4.375 billion years old, something that has deep implications in our understanding of the planet's formation. While some scientists said other samples weren't genuine, new research just published in the journal Nature Geoscience proves that this is the real McCoy. Read More >>

science
5 Crazy Places We Can Go Looking for Diamonds

Hold on to your engagement rings. Diamonds, according to an industry report, are falling off a supply cliff in 2018. As existing diamond mines are depleted even as worldwide demand increases—thanks, especially to a newly rich Asia—three months wages might soon buy you a much punier rock. Read More >>

space
It’s Raining Diamonds on Saturn and Jupiter

We're a little late to the party on this one, but it's just too fascinating to pass up. A team of planetary scientists recently claimed that the mix of methane, carbon and lightning in Saturn's atmosphere is causing diamonds to be forged in the planet's atmosphere. Like, a lot of diamonds. Read More >>

science
Tiny Diamond Thermometer Can Take the Temperature of a Single Cell

Turns out diamonds have powers beyond bringing bling happy jewellery enthusiasts and hopeful lovers to their knees. Harvard researchers have figured out how to make the shiny little pebbles into the world's tiniest thermometers. How tiny? Small enough to take the temperature of an individual cell. Read More >>

science
New Material Could Cool Gadgets Even Better Than Diamonds Do (Wait, What?)

As electronic devices get increasingly tiny, heat management becomes a bigger and bigger problem. In gadgets that can't practically house a fan, heat sinks do the job of keeping sensitive electronics cool. So far, the best-performing heat transfer material has been diamond, which any rap video will remind you is crazy expensive. Now, physicists have found that a boron compound could outperform all of Jay-no-hyphen-Z's ice. Read More >>