science
Computer Model Offers New Insights Into Dreaded Supervolcano

With its rushing rivers, sprawling canyons, and lush forests, America's Yellowstone National Park is an absolute treasure, but buried deep beneath its picturesque surface lies a hell that’s just waiting to be unleashed. Using computer models, researchers have simulated the conditions beneath North America’s largest supervolcano—discovering a zone that may control the movement of magma flowing out from the Earth’s mantle. Read More >>

science
Canadian Scientists Discover Freakishly Salty Lakes Hidden Under Giant Glacier

Researchers working in the Canadian high north have discovered two super-salty lakes buried deep beneath the Arctic ice. Untouched for thousands of years, the subglacial lakes may provide a tantalising glimpse into the kinds of alien life that might exist on Europa and Enceladus, two ice-covered moons in the far reaches of our Solar System. Read More >>

science
Antarctic Expedition to Find Ernest Shackleton’s Lost Ship Set for Next Year

Early next year, an international team of explorers will investigate the area in-and-around the massive iceberg that split away from Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf in July 2017. As an added bonus, the researchers will also attempt to locate the wreck of the Endurance, which sunk in 1915 as part of the ill-fated Shackleton expedition. Read More >>

geology
UFO Wingnuts Confuse a Fallen Boulder for a Crashed Alien Spacecraft

There’s a viral video making the rounds showing the site of an apparent crashed UFO on the remote island of South Georgia. On closer inspection, however, the object’s true identify is something considerably more banal: It’s just a stupid rock that fell from a nearby mountain. Read More >>

science
Divers in Mexico Have Discovered the World’s Largest Flooded Cave

The Yucatan Peninsula is renowned for its extensive network of submerged tunnels and caves. Now, after searching for near two decades, divers with the Gran Acuífero Maya project have proven that two massive caverns are connected, making it the largest known flooded cave on Earth. Read More >>

science
Scientists Observe Earth’s Mysterious Hum on the Ocean Floor

Even in the absence of giant earthquakes, this planet is still emitting a quiet hum. Researchers have measured it at the ocean’s depths. Read More >>

climate change
More Evidence That Pink Snow Will Be a Problem for the Planet

Last year, a team of European researchers was alarmed to learn that glaciers covered in pink snow—caused not by an Ocean Spray truck collision, but by snow-dwelling red algae—were melting faster than the surrounding white ice. Now, another group of researchers has observed the same phenomenon halfway across the world in Alaska. Pink snow really is a problem for Earth’s glaciers, and it could get a lot worse in the future. Read More >>

science
Huge Wafts of Smoke From North American Wildfires Have Traveled All the Way to Europe

It’s been a particularly brutal wildfire season in parts of western North America, as several large blazes continue to cause headaches from California up to British Columbia. As shocking new satellite images show, the smoke from these fires hasn’t been limited to the west coast, or even the North American continent. It’s drifted all the way over the Atlantic Ocean into European skies. Read More >>

science
Why Are Sea Levels Around Miami Rising So Much Faster Than Other Places?

In Miami, it’s no secret that flooding is occurring more often, nor that rising sea levels and climate change are to blame. But, as is often the case when you drill down into the inner workings of our planet, the full story is a bit more complicated. Read More >>

science
Terrifying Ocean Predator Changes Our View of the Worst Mass Extinction in History

252 million years ago, the Earth was in a really bad place. At the boundary of the Permian and Triassic periods, our biosphere experienced its most dramatic mass extinction event (so far), one so utterly complete that it has been solemnly termed the “Great Dying.” Precious little was spared, and it’s generally been thought that it took many millions of years for life to stand back up again. But a recently-discovered fossil dating to just after the Great Dying is helping to erode our vision of a slow post-extinction recovery, showing that ecosystems recovered very quickly, were thriving, and full of teeth. Rows upon rows of razor-edged teeth. Read More >>

environment
Antarctica Just Plopped a One Trillion Tonne Iceberg Into the Ocean

As expected, an iceberg half the size of Jamaica has finally cut itself loose from Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf. Dubbed A68, the 2,240 square mile (5,800 square km) chunk of ice one of the biggest ever recorded—but what happens now, both to the iceberg and the ice shelf, is anyone’s guess. Read More >>

science
The Black Death May Have Had a Surprising Effect on the Environment

From 1347 to 1351, a nightmare disease ravaged Europe, afflicting victims with putrid black boils, fevers, vomiting, and in short order, death. Daily life ground to a halt as the Black Death spread along medieval trade routes, claiming an estimated 20 million lives with ruthless efficiency. Now, a team of researchers is asserting that the plague had an unexpected impact: clearing the air of a toxic pollutant for the first time in over a thousand years. Read More >>

science
Why Did Montana Experience a Powerful Earthquake Last Night?

Last night, planet Earth rumbled in a place where it usually doesn’t rumble: Montana, USA. But it also rumbled in the Philippines. Come to think of it, it rumbled in Vanuatu and Japan too. The Earth rumbles a lot. Read More >>

science
Killer Tsunami in Greenland Possibly Triggered by Landslide

Four people are missing and nearly a dozen homes were flooded after a rare tsunami struck the west coast of Greenland on Saturday. Initial reports attributed the giant wave to a magnitude four earthquake, but speculation is emerging that the highly-localised tsunami was actually produced by a massive landslide. Read More >>

environment
Why Did an Enormous Chunk of West Antarctica Suddenly Start Melting?

300,000 square miles is nearly twice the area of California. It’s difficult to visualise a space that vast, but go ahead and give it a try. Now, imagine this California plus-sized chunk of land is covered in thousands of feet of ice. Then, all of a sudden, that frozen fortress becomes a wading pool. Read More >>