science
Killer Tsunami in Greenland Possibly Triggered by Landslide

Four people are missing and nearly a dozen homes were flooded after a rare tsunami struck the west coast of Greenland on Saturday. Initial reports attributed the giant wave to a magnitude four earthquake, but speculation is emerging that the highly-localised tsunami was actually produced by a massive landslide. Read More >>

environment
Why Did an Enormous Chunk of West Antarctica Suddenly Start Melting?

300,000 square miles is nearly twice the area of California. It’s difficult to visualise a space that vast, but go ahead and give it a try. Now, imagine this California plus-sized chunk of land is covered in thousands of feet of ice. Then, all of a sudden, that frozen fortress becomes a wading pool. Read More >>

science
Hundreds of Giant Seafloor Craters Produced By Explosive Methane Farts

Researchers working in the Barents Sea have discovered hundreds of craters on the Arctic Sea floor, some measuring over a kilometre in width. These craters, which date back to the end of the last Ice Age, were formed when large reserves of methane exploded in the wake of retreating ice sheets. Because methane is a potent greenhouse gas, this discovery is a potential warning of things to come in our warming world. Read More >>

science
Flat Earthers Won’t Believe This News on Antarctica’s Climate

The Arctic is the fastest-warming place on our overheated planet, but so far, its polar opposite has managed to stay pretty cool. Why is Antarctica warming so slowly compared with the Arctic? The answer is complicated, but a new study suggests we’re overlooking a basic reality of geometry. Read More >>

science
How Does a 110-Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Still Have Its Skin?

An arresting image of a “mummified” dinosaur went viral this weekend after National Geographic broke the story of the 110-million-year-old armoured plant-eater, a newfound species of nodosaur whose exquisite remains are now on display in the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Alberta, Canada. Read More >>

environment
The American Midwest Looks Absolutely Drenched in This New Image From Space

Several states across the American Midwest are experiencing intensive flooding in the wake of unusually vigorous storm system that passed through earlier in the week. Images taken from above and on the ground show the extent of the record-breaking floods, which now threaten areas downstream. Read More >>

environment
A Second Giant Crack Has Appeared on Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf

A 80-mile-long crack along Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf has remained stable since February, but scientists have now detected a new branch, one that’s extending about six miles from the main rift. It seems like only a matter of time before the 2,000 square mile ice shelf plunges into the sea. Read More >>

science
Stunning New Atlas Shows the Polar Seafloor Like We’ve Never Seen It

An unprecedented collaboration involving 20 countries, 75 institutions, and over 250 marine geologists has yielded a new atlas that’s providing our best glimpse yet of the seafloor at both polar regions of the planet. The images are of significant scientific value, but they’re also quite beautiful. Read More >>

environment
Why the Scariest Response to Climate Change Is Finally Being Taken Seriously

We’re not doing such a great job solving the whole climate change problem, which is why some experts think it’s time to study more radical tactics. The notion of geoengineering—hacking the climate to cool the planet—is controversial, awe-inspiring, and to many, terrifying. And yet, despite their own grave concerns with the idea, a group of researchers believes the time has come to explore whether planet-hacking might really work. Read More >>

science
We Just Found Out Antarctica Is Covered in Rivers

In 1908, Ernest Shackleton’s legendary Nimrod team was making its way toward the South Pole when the men were startled by something unexpected: the sound of liquid water, roaring across the frozen wasteland toward the sea. One hundred and nine years later, scientists can confirm that this sound, described by one early explorer as “odd after the usual Antarctic silence” was not a trick of the mens’ imaginations, nor was it a fluke. Hundreds of individual waterways gush across our planet’s ice-covered continent in the summertime, and they’ve been doing so for decades. Read More >>

science
The Last Scrap of the North American Ice Sheet Is Melting

The planet is warming and Arctic ice is melting. These facts are hardly news. But it’s not just habitat for polar bears that’s being lost—a piece of Earth’s history is disappearing, too. Read More >>

science
Scientists Found a New Window Into the Hellish Ancient Earth

Four and a half billion years ago, some dust from a cloud orbiting around a star coalesced into a rocky planet. But unlike most of the dusty balls in our solar system, this one was special—it was just the right distance away from the star that one day after the surface had cooled, water could exist as a liquid, rather than a solid or gas. The planet’s surface eventually fractured into plates that shifted around, becoming continents. All that shifting has rubbed away the details of that ancient Earth. Was the era as hellish as its name, “Hadean” implies, or was Earth always a water-rich orb with moving plates? Read More >>

science
Some Good News About the Worst Mass Extinction in Earth’s History

If the fact that the Earth is careening toward a sixth mass extinction event makes you uncomfortable, good news: it turns out, the biosphere may have rebounded “quickly” after the worst mass extinction in history. That, at least, is the implication of one remarkable fossil assemblage formed less than 2 million years after the so-called Great Dying. Read More >>

environment
What Happens When That Enormous Antarctic Ice Shelf Finally Breaks?

For the past few months, scientists have watched with bated breath as a rift in the Antarctic Peninsula’s Larsen C ice shelf grows longer by the day. Eventually, the rift will make a clean break, expelling a 2,000 square mile chunk of ice into the sea. It’ll be an epic sight to behold—but what happens after the ice is gone? Read More >>

science
Enormous Pleistocene Landslide Discovered Off the Coast of Australia

Around 300,000 years ago, a ridge near Australia’s Great Barrier Reef collapsed, unleashing a massive undersea avalanche. The ensuing landslide scattered debris for miles and triggered a sizeable tsunami, according to new research. Read More >>