environment
Salmon Spill Sends Thousands of Invasive Fish Swimming Up and Down the Pacific Coast

Last month, a pen in Washington State holding hundreds of thousands of fish broke, sending swarms of silver Atlantic salmon swimming to the south and north. If you're up on your US geography, you may know that Washington State is not on the Atlantic. Now, these invasive fish have been reported as far as 150 miles away in Canada. Read More >>

science
Squirrels Organise Their Nuts Better Than Some Humans Organise Their Wardrobes

Ah, the simple pleasure of a perfectly stacked soda display or an impeccably organised closet. Who doesn’t feel at least a little re-energised after a bout of over-the-top arranging? Turns out, our squirrelly friends might feel the same way about neatly-organised nuts. Read More >>

science
Burying Beetles’ Embalming Bum Juice Is Even Worse Than It Sounds

Burying beetles (Nicrophorus) are hard to miss. The insects aren’t big, but most species are painted with vibrant, orange blotches on a glossy black background. According to new research, walking around dressed in their Halloween best may have a very important function for the beetles. The colouration may be “aposematic,” bright and conspicuous to sternly warn other animals of the wearer’s unsuitability as a meal. So, what is it about the burying beetle that makes it noxious to would-be predators? Anal secretions. That’s right, bum juice. Read More >>

animals
After Years of Sabotaging Whalers, This Radical Anti-Whaling Group Is Ending Its Patrols

For the past 12 years, the anti-whaling organisation Sea Shepherd has doggedly tracked and harassed Japanese whalers who it claims are working illegally in the Southern Ocean. Now, the group made famous by the documentary-style TV series Whale Wars says it’s halting its sea-based patrols, claiming it cannot compete with the whalers and their “military grade technology.” Read More >>

science
Fish Are Eating Small Bits of Plastic Because It Smells Delicious

Each year, our civilisation pours around eight million tons of plastic into the ocean, a portion of which ends up in the bellies of fish, and by consequence, our dinner plates. New research suggests that at least one species of fish isn’t ingesting this plastic debris by chance—they’re actually attracted to the smell. Read More >>

science
Oh Great, Another Way Humans Are Screwing With Pollinators

On Monday, the US Department of Agriculture brought us some much needed good news, when it reported data suggesting that honeybees might finally be bouncing back from colony collapse disorder. Today, a team of scientists countered with some bleak news. A new study published in the journal Nature indicates that artificial light pollution might be a much bigger problem for pollinators—and their plants—than we realised. Read More >>

science
Terrifying Ocean Predator Changes Our View of the Worst Mass Extinction in History

252 million years ago, the Earth was in a really bad place. At the boundary of the Permian and Triassic periods, our biosphere experienced its most dramatic mass extinction event (so far), one so utterly complete that it has been solemnly termed the “Great Dying.” Precious little was spared, and it’s generally been thought that it took many millions of years for life to stand back up again. But a recently-discovered fossil dating to just after the Great Dying is helping to erode our vision of a slow post-extinction recovery, showing that ecosystems recovered very quickly, were thriving, and full of teeth. Rows upon rows of razor-edged teeth. Read More >>

animals
We Don’t Deserve Capybaras

In a world seemingly intent on destroying itself, the humble capybara is a wholesome good. The oversized friendship guinea pig is a reminder of what humanity could achieve if we stopped yelling at each other on the internet. That’s why this week on Animals Are Good, we’re celebrating the world’s largest—and chillest—rodent, the capybara. Read More >>

animals
These Bears Eat as Much Junk Food as You Do

Bears, they’re just like us. And I’m not referring to a subset of hairy humans, but to some furry critters in Wisconsin whose diets contain a staggering amount of junk food. Seriously! Read More >>

science
Plants Turn Caterpillars into Cannibals to Save Themselves

In the caterpillar-versus-plant fight, the winner might seem obvious. One side sits motionless in the sun, while the other feasts on it. But the tomato plant has a nefarious defence strategy. In some encounters with herbivores, it winds up relatively unscathed, while the caterpillars wind up eating each other. Read More >>

uncategorized
How a Massive Asteroid Strike Helped Frogs Inherit the Earth

Frogs have been around for nearly 200 million years, but it wasn’t until a 10-mile-wide asteroid struck our planet, wiping out three-quarters of all life on Earth — including the dinosaurs — that these crafty amphibians were able to make their big evolutionary move, according to new research. Read More >>

animals
Rotting Wildebeest Carcasses Are a Force of Nature in the Serengeti

Each year, thousands of wildebeest drown while making their annual migration through the Serengeti. New research shows how the resulting two million pounds of rotting flesh performs a crucial role in maintaining the region’s vibrant ecosystem. Read More >>

uncategorized
Why There’s Still Hope for the World’s Coral Reefs

Last week was a sad one for the planet, but buried beneath headlines of the history’s largest carbon polluter telling everyone else to piss off, a team of researchers issued a more hopeful message: Coral reefs, a poster child for impacts of climate change, may not be as doomed as we think. Read More >>

science
You Will Feel Unclean Watching This Video of Bee Sex

For those who came here expecting the uncut version of Bee Movie, you’re in the wrong place. This is a blog about some very unnerving bee-on-bee action—not some culmination of sexual tension between Renee Zellweger and Jerry Seinfeld’s characters in the 2007 cult movie. Apparently, long-horned bees copulating is pretty unsettling and uh, there’s video to prove it. I’m sorry. Read More >>