science
Bug Scientists Squash ‘Insect Apocalypse’ Paper

Last month, an alarming scientific paper warned that over 40 per cent of all insect species are in decline. News of an impending “insectageddon”—a world either devoid of insects or plagued with pests—was broadcast far and wide by the media. There’s just one problem: Entomologists don’t buy it. Read More >>

science
Gemologist Finds Insect Trapped in Opal Instead of Amber

On a trip to Indonesia, gemologist Brian Berger purchased an opal that appeared to have an insect entombed inside. Insects trapped in amber are a common-enough sight, but in a slow-forming gemstone like opal? Read More >>

animals
Termites Are Finally Being Recognised For What They Really Are: Social Cockroaches

Very quietly, and without any formal announcement, the Common Names Committee of the Entomological Society of America has decided to list termites in the same category as cockroaches. It seems weird to lump the two together, but it’s a move that scientists have been considering for nearly a century. Read More >>

science
DIY Bed Bug Treatment Attempt Accidentally Results in Massive Fire

Bed bugs—the blood-sucking, chitinous nightmares which serve as the clearest proof that if there is a divine creator behind the universe, it hates us—were once nearly eradicated from the U.S. But in recent years they’ve come back worse than ever, beefed up from decades of exposure to insecticides and helped along by an increase in global travel and a decrease in public knowledge of how to fight them. Read More >>

science
Adorable Couple Donates Their £8 Million Insect Collection To Science

Lois and Charles O'Brien are both in their 80s. They met at the University of Arizona in the 1950s, "brought together by insects", according to Charles in an interview with The Guardian. They're big on bugs—enough to have collected more than a million insects, a collection worth $10 million (£8 million), according to Nico Franz, an entomologist at Arizona State University, where the insects are now being kept. Read More >>

animals
Amazing New Dragon Ants Remind Us Nature is Cooler Than Fantasy

While it can sometimes feel like we’ve turned over every last stone on this planet, it’s a fact that the natural world can still surprise us. Need some proof? Just feast your eyes on these badass new dragon ants, discovered deep in the tropical rainforest of New Guinea. Read More >>

animals
Saharan Silver Ants Have Evolved an Awesome Way of Fighting Extreme Desert Heat

The strikingly beautiful Saharan silver ant is capable of withstanding some of the most extreme temperatures on the planet. New research shows that their silver sheen serves as a heat-repellent system, reflecting incoming sunlight like a prism. Read More >>

science
Why Bed Bugs are Getting Harder to Kill

Bed bugs are among the most dreaded pests we have to deal with, and they’re proving to be a formidable foe. New research suggests that bed bugs are able to ward off insecticides by developing thicker skins. Read More >>

science
Bloodthirsty Ticks Have a Seriously Weird Genome

Ticks—those unbreakable, blood-lusting arthropods that haunt your summer camp memories—have some fascinating genetic secrets. The tick genome tells a tale of weaponised spit, expandable armour, and how to drink 100 times one’s body weight in blood. Strangest of all, it’s utterly enormous. Read More >>

science
You Don’t Want to Know How Many Species of Bugs Live in Your Home

Science, isn’t it great? Especially when it’s bringing us fascinating insights like this one: there could be up to 500 species of arthropods — insects, spiders, mites, and centipedes — living right alongside you in your home. Apparently, the war on bugs was always a lost cause. Read More >>

food
Crickets Aren’t the Superfood of the Future They’re Cracked Up to Be

Bug-eating evangelists like to talk about how crickets are caloric magic, claiming the insects can transform table scraps into a crunchy, healthy protein. A new study debunks at least one aspect of what’s being touted everywhere as the food of the future: Crickets are not the resource-efficient calorie-making machines we believe them to be. Read More >>

science
30 Previously Unknown Species of Fly Discovered in Los Angeles

Nature doesn't end at the borders of a city — it's just transformed. That's why scientists are finding new animal species in urban areas, where the ecosystems favour scavengers, hardy weeds, and junk-eaters. It probably comes as no surprise that the sprawling city of Los Angeles is home to its own unique fly species. Read More >>

science
The Entire Premise of Jurassic Park Is Wrong Because of Mosquitos

You're probably going to want to sit down for this one. And hold your loved ones near if you've got them, because it's time to wake up from our slumber of lies -- apparently Jurassic Park is, in fact, not scientifically accurate. All because of one little, mistyped mosquito. Read More >>