olympics
As the Winter Games Begin, Norovirus Continues to Spread at an Alarming Rate

The 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea is quickly resembling a terrible cruise, thanks to a norovirus outbreak that’s rapidly spreading. Read More >>

health
A Cholera Epidemic in Yemen Is Now Wildly Out of Control

With the civil war in Yemen now having entered into its third year, the beleaguered Middle Eastern nation is having to contend with the devastating impacts of conflict, including disease. An alarming report from the World Health Organization estimates that some 500,000 Yemenis have contracted cholera since April of this year, of which 2,000 have died. It’s now the worst active cholera epidemic in the world, and one of the largest in decades. Read More >>

medicine
An Edible Vaccine For Wild Apes Could Revolutionise the Way We Fight Ebola

Like humans, gorillas and chimpanzees can get infected by Ebola. To protect our closest relatives from this dreaded disease, and to prevent the virus from spilling over into human populations, scientists have now developed an oral vaccine to combat Ebola in the wild. It sounds very promising, but the researchers have run into legal, political, and ethical obstacles that could make it difficult to push the research further. Read More >>

health
The WHO Was Wrong to Say Zika Is No Longer an Emergency

Late last week, the World Health Organization declared that the Zika virus, along with its related neurological complications, no longer constitutes an international emergency. The announcement is a troubling development that could threaten important research, while also undermining those who are most affected, namely women, children, and the poor. Read More >>

medicine
A Shocking Number of People With Ebola Don’t Show Symptoms

Scientists have learned that upwards of 25 per cent of all people who become infected with Ebola show none of the typical symptoms. The finding suggests the recent West African Ebola Epidemic was more widespread than previously thought, and that new methods need to be developed to diagnose and contain the dreaded virus during an outbreak. Read More >>

science
The Zika Epidemic Has Been Given a Three-Year Expiration Date

Models produced by researchers at Imperial College London indicate that the ongoing Zika epidemic in parts of Latin American will likely burn itself out within three years. Finally, we have some good news to share about this dreadful disease. Read More >>

health
A US Government-Funded Zika Study Will Use Olympic Athletes as Guinea Pigs

In an effort to learn more about the dreaded disease, the US National Institutes of Health is funding a study in which a group of US athletes, coaches, and staff will be monitored for exposure to the Zika virus while attending the 2016 Summer Olympics and Paralympics in Brazil. Read More >>

science
Zika Can Cause Birth Defects Even If Mothers Show No Symptoms

A new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that Zika-infected women who are in their third trimester have virtually no chance of having children with microcephaly. Troublingly, the same study shows that women who exhibit no symptoms can still give birth to babies with brain abnormalities. Read More >>

health
You Don’t Need to Freeze Your Sperm if You’re Going to the Olympics

In preparation for the upcoming Olympics in Brazil, British long jump champion Greg Rutherford is planning to freeze his sperm just in case he contracts Zika. It’s meant as a precaution to prevent any future children from developing birth defects, but in reality it’s a complete overreaction based on unfounded fears. Read More >>

science
A Beautiful Illustration of Something Quite Horrible

Up until a few months ago, we knew virtually nothing about the Zika virus — or what it even looked like. But a beautiful new illustration by David S. Goodsell reveals its hidden details, while also showing how the dreaded virus goes to work. Read More >>

science
This Piece of Paper Can Diagnose Zika Incredibly Fast

Researchers have demonstrated a paper-based device that can detect the Zika virus within two to three hours. It’s affordable, effective, and practical for widespread use—particularly in countries with underdeveloped healthcare infrastructures—and it’s also capable of telling the difference between Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases, including dengue and chikungunya. Read More >>

science
Our First Major Breakthrough in Understanding How Zika Virus Attacks the Brain

Scientists strongly suspect a link between Zika and microcephaly, a disorder that causes abnormally small heads in newborns, but they’re not entirely sure. Now, a team of researchers may have figured out how this mosquito-borne virus attacks the developing brains of foetuses—and wow, is it nasty. Read More >>

science
Link Between Zika and Rare Neurological Disorder Grows Stronger

Researchers in France have uncovered the strongest evidence yet that the Zika virus can trigger a paralysis-causing nerve syndrome called Guillain-Barré. Read More >>

science
CDC Confirms Zika in Nine US Pregnancies

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed Zika infections in nine pregnant women in the United States, all of whom contracted the virus while travelling. Three babies have already been born—one with a brain defect. Read More >>

science
Pope Says Contraception May Be Permitted in Regions Hit By Zika

Speaking to reporters earlier today, Pope Francis said it might be okay for women exposed to the Zika virus to use contraceptives to avoid pregnancy. His Holiness also reiterated the Vatican’s stance on abortion, which he described as an “absolute evil.” Read More >>