amazon
Amazon Warehouse Strike in Spain Reportedly Results in Police Clashes, Arrests

The second day of a three-day strike by Amazon warehouse workers near Madrid coinciding with the e-commerce giant’s Prime Day promotion escalated significantly on Tuesday, with trade unions telling Spanish newspaper Público that police in riot gear had charged the strikers multiple times on supposed grounds they were blocking traffic. Police arrested at least two participants in the protest, with one worker allegedly hit in the face with a truncheon and losing teeth as a result. Read More >>

airbnb
Airbnb Told to Stop Smashing on Mystery Costs at the End

Room booking app operator Airbnb has been handed a big of list of things it needs to do better, with EU consumer commissioners warning it to stop hiding additional fees until the very end of the booking process, as that's a bit of a shady thing to do and has ruined many a dream of a cheap night somewhere bearable. Read More >>

european union
Citizens of the EU Are Being Given the Chance to Vote Down Daylight Saving Time

The European Commission is giving citizens of the European Union the opportunity to cast their vote in a public poll that could lead to the elimination of the sleep-depraving practice of changing clocks twice a year for the sake of daylight saving time. Read More >>

internet
Wikipedia Italy Blocks All Articles in Protest of EU’s Ruinous Copyright Proposals

Last month, members of European Parliament voted to move forward with a sweeping overhaul of the European Union’s copyright laws that critics say will impede the spread of news, kill memes, bolster tech giants, and stifle innovation. Ahead of the final vote this week, Wikipedia Italy has joined protests across the continent by blocking users from viewing its pages. Read More >>

environment
The EU is Planning a Ban on Single-Use Plastic Products

The European Commission is proposing a ban on around 10 single-use plastic items that it says account for approximately 70 per cent of all garbage in the European Union’s waters and beaches, including cutlery, straws, cotton buds, plates, some coffee cups, and stirrers, CNN Money reported on Monday. Read More >>

privacy
Dozens of American News Sites Blocked in Europe as GDPR Goes Into Effect Today

The European Union’s digital privacy law, known as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), officially went into effect today. But some websites in the U.S. have decided to block their services entirely rather than adhere to the new regulations. Dozens of American newspapers are currently blocked in Europe and web services like Instapaper have suspended operations in the European Union for the foreseeable future. Read More >>

privacy
Instapaper Is Blocking Users in Europe Until It Figures Out New Privacy Rules

Instapaper has informed its European users that it will temporarily cut off their access to the platform starting today. The reason? This Pinterest-owned service needs more than the two years it had to comply with the European Union’s new batch of privacy rules that go into effect on 25 May. Sorry, Europe! Read More >>

facebook
We Can Live-Stream Zuckerberg’s EU Interrogation Tomorrow

The EU is about to haul Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg in for questioning, and you might want to have your virtual assistant remind you of the time, as it's all going to be live-streamed online tomorrow. Read More >>

streaming
The EU Wants to Force Amazon and Netflix to Stream More European Content

The EU seems to be a fan of going after big tech companies, especially when it comes to streaming. Recently it implemented rules that meant streaming services had to give customers access to their home catalogue while travelling within the EU, and now it's working on rules that say at least 30 per cent of available content has to be of European origin. Read More >>

travel
EU Ambassadors Approve Electronic Travel Authorisation System For “Third Countries” (That Means Us Now)

Another slow clap for the Brexiteers today as ambassadors to the European Union have all agreed on a new system that will see the EU adopt an ESTA-style visa approval system for anyone visiting the Schengen Area from a non-EU country. And because Britain is in the midst of a national nervous breakdown, where we voted to make life actively worse for ourselves, that will include us too. Read More >>

apple
Apple’s Purchase of Shazam Gets Put on Hold While EU Investigates Anti-Trust Concerns

While the US Department of Justice battles Time Warner and AT&T in court to block one mega merger, another business deal is getting held up by officials overseas. On Monday, the European Commission announced that it is has opened an anti-trust investigation into Apple’s buyout of Shazam, potentially postponing the acquisition for months—or even killing it altogether. Read More >>

uber
The EU Says Uber is Still Counts as a Taxi Service, Even in France

For as long as it's existed, Uber has maintained that it's a technology company designed to link customers with independent drivers who can take them places. It's not a taxi or transport company, so it shouldn't have to be legislated like one, is the argument, but it hasn't had much luck convincing governments and regulators of that fact. Read More >>

google
European Union Competition Watchdog Renews Threats to Break Up Google Into Smaller Companies

Facebook may have had a very bad week stateside and in the UK over its Cambridge Analytica data scandal, but European Union officials are maintaining that fellow tech giant Google may ultimately need to be broken up, lest it swallow the internet whole. Read More >>

internet
Europe to Facebook and Google: Remove Illegal Content in One Hour (We’re Serious This Time!)

The European Union really wants tech companies to get their shit together when it comes to policing content on their platforms. Today, it issued new guidelines for how companies like Twitter, Google, and Facebook should handle illegal content on its European websites: quickly, proactively, and with human oversight. Read More >>

google
Google Says It Has Received 2.4 Million Takedown Requests Under EU’s ‘Right to Be Forgotten’ Laws

Google has now been complying with the European Union’s controversial “right to be forgotten” laws, which the European Court of Justice first ruled applied to search engines in 2014, for three years. On Monday, the search giant released an updated version of its annual Transparency Report, which discloses how many and what kind of requests Google has received to delist pages from results and in how many instances the company complied. Read More >>