surveillance
Chinese Police Say Face Recognition Identified Suspect Out of Crowd of 50,000

Chinese police say they used facial recognition to identify, then arrest a man attending a crowded concert in Nanchang, China’s third largest city. South China Morning Post reports that security cameras equipped with the software pinpointed the man out of the estimated 50,000 other people also in attendance at the concert. Read More >>

snapchat
Snapchat’s Long-Awaited iPhone X Lenses Won’t Make Me Forget Rihanna’s Decree

iPhone X owners who still use Snapchat are in for a pleasant surprise today. The camera company, famously annihilated by Rihanna after it approved an ad mocking domestic violence victims, is finally releasing its previously announced lenses designed for the iPhone X. The feature was teased nearly seven months ago, so it’s about time. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook’s New Face Recognition Features: What We Do (and Mostly Don’t) Know

Being on Facebook means being seen, and recently some users have spotted a News Feed alert describing several new face recognition features coming to the social network. The notification looks like this: Read More >>

ai
Even When Spotting Gender, Current Face Recognition Tech Works Better for White Dudes

A new review of face recognition software found that, when identifying gender, the software is most accurate for men with light skin and least accurate for women with dark skin. Joy Buolamwini, an MIT Media Lab researcher and computer scientist, tested three commercial gender classifiers offered as part of face recognition services. As she found, the software misidentified the gender of dark-skinned females 35 per cent of the time. By contrast, the error rate rate for light-skinned males was less than one percent. Read More >>

ai
China’s Dystopian Police State Arms Cops With Smart Glasses to Scan Everyone’s Faces

Chinese police have begun using glasses equipped with facial recognition-enabled cameras to spot fugitives travelling through train stations. Though Chinese police have said the glasses will spot people using fake IDs or travelling to avoid a warrant, many are concerned about China using the tech to target political advocates and minorities. China has been accused of using face recognition tech to “fence in” the Muslim Uighur minority in northwestern Xinjiang. Read More >>

drones
South Korea Preps Serious Anti-Drone Measures Ahead of Winter Olympics

Ahead of the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korean officials are prepping a fleet of specially equipped tactical drones to deter terrorism. Korean outlets Hankyoreh and Yonhap report the fleet includes drones equipped with cameras, face recognition capabilities, and a “drone-catching drone” that will drop nets to disable suspicious UAVs. Read More >>

wtf
Finally, Facial Recognition for Cows is Here

Face recognition has spread from airports to football games to primary schools and now, farms and stables. An Irish computer vision company, Cargill and Cainthus, announced Wednesday that they’re piloting face recognition technology on cows starting this year. Privacy advocates may be less concerned by the threat of an encroaching bovine panopticon, but the worldwide pilot speaks to how both AI and face recognition technologies are slowly being embedded in all aspects of modern life. Read More >>

ai
Olympic Planners Want to Scan the Faces of Hundreds of Thousands at the 2020 Tokyo Games

According to The Japan Times, the organisers of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics plan to use expansive face recognition software at the games, scanning and tracking the faces of hundreds of thousands of athletes, journalists, and officials. Sources close to Olympic officials told the newspaper that the technology won’t be used on spectators. Read More >>

artificial intelligence
Japanese Researchers Trick AI Into Thinking 3D-Printed Turtle Is a Rifle

Japanese researchers have used a startlingly simple exploit to trick object recognition AI into classifying a 3D-printed turtle as a rifle. Incredibly, they did it by changing a single pixel. Read More >>

surveillance
The Dystopian Surveillance State Will Be Extremely Convenient 

When privacy finally dies, it will be, if nothing else, extremely convenient for travellers. Read More >>

security
New AI Could Turn Police Body Cams Into Nightmare Surveillance Tools

Time and time again, police officers shoot, and sometimes kill, civilians holding harmless objects, later claiming they mistook them for guns: a phone, a bible, and a Wii controller. In early February, police body camera manufacturer Taser announced that it had acquired the artificial intelligence startup Dextro Inc—a “computer vision” research team that claims it can use object recognition software to train officers to better discern actual threats. But privacy experts find the surveillance and profiling possibilities offered by this latest, but certainly not last, upgrade to police body cameras unsettling. Moreover, the question remains: The cameras may be getting smarter, but are they actually making the public safer? Read More >>

neural networks
Neural Networks Can Now Turn a Single Photo Into a Creepy 3D Face Render

Behold the glorious future of neural networks: disembodied faces rotating in the darkness. Research submitted to Cornell University uses deep neural networks to create detailed 3D models of faces using a single 2D picture. Read More >>