facial recognition
Axon CEO Says Face Recognition Isn’t Accurate Enough for Body Cams Yet

Face recognition is coming to schools, stadiums, and airports, but surprisingly not to body cameras—yet. On an earnings call Tuesday, Rick Smith, CEO of Axon, one of the largest body camera manufacturers in the US, said the reason was simple: In addition to privacy and policy concerns, face recognition isn’t accurate enough. Read More >>

facial recognition
Can We Make Non-Racist Face Recognition?

As companies race to employ facial recognition everywhere from major league ballparks to schools , we face tough questions about the technology’s potential to intensify racial bias; Commercial face recognition software has repeatedly been shown to be less accurate on people with darker skin, and civil rights advocates worry about the disturbingly targeted ways face-scanning can be used by police. Read More >>

novichok
Police Identify Two Russian Suspects in Novichok Poisonings Using Facial Recognition Tech

British police have reportedly identified two suspects in the nerve agent poisonings that left one person dead and three others injured. The suspects were identified after UK police combed through “months” of surveillance footage at British airports, as well as security camera footage from around Salisbury. Read More >>

microsoft
Microsoft ‘Improves’ Racist Facial Recognition Software

In a self-congratulatory move, Microsoft announced some major improvements yesterday to its fundamentally biased facial recognition software. The Azure-based Face API was criticised in a research paper earlier this year for its error rate—as high as 20.8 per cent—when attempting to identify the gender of people of colour, particularly women with darker skin tones. In contrast, Microsoft’s AI was able to identify the gender of photos of “lighter male faces” with an error rate of zero per cent, the study concluded. Read More >>

amazon
Amazon Shareholders Call for Jeff Bezos to Stop Selling Facial Recognition to Police

On Friday, 20 groups of Amazon shareholders sent CEO Jeff Bezos a letter pressuring him to stop selling the company’s face recognition software to American law enforcement, CNN reports. Called Rekognition, the software came under greater scrutiny last month when the ACLU published revealing internal documents related to its use by police. Numerous civil rights organisations co-signed a letter demanding Amazon stop assisting government surveillance, and several members of the US Congress have expressed concerns about the partnerships. Read More >>

police
Facial Recognition Used by Wales Police Has 90 Per cent False Positive Rate

According to the Guardian, the South Wales police scanned the crowd of more than 170,000 people who travelled to the nation’s capital for the football match between Real Madrid and Juventus. The cameras identified 2,470 people as criminals. Read More >>

china
Jaywalking in China Can Get You Hit with a Stream of Water

Law enforcement officers in the city of Daye in China’s Hubei province recently installed five bright yellow posts at one of the city’s busiest intersections. The new instalments come fully equipped with a number of methods meant to deter walkers from committing the unforgivable crime of jaywalking. Read More >>

uncategorized
Face ID Is Unstoppable

It sucks when a new technology comes along and creeps everybody out. It sucks even more when that technology is so good, so life-changing that even the most discerning consumer sets that anxiety aside and says, “Who cares if Apple owns detailed biometric data about my face?” That’s what Face ID has done to me with the iPhone X. And if you’re not already using it, then you’re next. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook Swears It Won’t Use Its New Powerful Face Recognition to Suggest ‘People You May Know’

On Tuesday, Facebook announced that it’s going to start scanning all the photos uploaded to the social network looking for your face, unless you opt out—or unless you are an EU or Canadian resident, where privacy law actually limits what Facebook can do with people’s faces. The purpose of the scanning, according to Facebook, is to alert you if someone has publicly uploaded a photo of you that you don’t know about, especially if they are trying to impersonate you. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook Wants Your Face and You’ll Probably Let Them Have It

Facebook just got one step closer to becoming the literal embodiment of its name. On Tuesday, the company announced it’s rolling out several new facial recognition features on its platforms. Once you agree to let Facebook use your face data, you gain access to new tools the company says will help protect your privacy and block catfishing attempts. (This doesn't yet apply to the EU and Canada, where Facebook does not offer face recognition technology.) Read More >>

facebook
Facebook May Soon Demand a Selfie if It Detects Suspicious Activity on Your Account

Facebook appears to be preparing to launch a new kind of captcha which asks users to prove their identities by uploading photos of their faces, Wired reported on Tuesday. Read More >>

uncategorized
What’s Really Up With Apple Giving Face Data to App Developers?

App developers can access more robust data about your face and the expressions you make with iPhone X, raising concerns from privacy advocates who worry that this sensitive facial data will end up in the hands of advertisers. Read More >>

artificial intelligence
Japanese Researchers Trick AI Into Thinking 3D-Printed Turtle Is a Rifle

Japanese researchers have used a startlingly simple exploit to trick object recognition AI into classifying a 3D-printed turtle as a rifle. Incredibly, they did it by changing a single pixel. Read More >>

security
Negligent Employees Are Stoked About Facial Recognition

A recent survey reveals why corporate password policies are doing very little to stop employees from mishandling their passwords. It also finds most employees favour biometric security and that Apple’s new Face ID feature is widely trusted—even though almost no one has actually used it yet. Read More >>

uncategorized
iPhone Apps Can Theoretically Spy on You With Basic Camera Permissions

A warning to all: On Wednesday, a developer who works for Google published a demonstration app on GitHub that he claims shows off the creepy ways a rogue iPhone app can photograph you at any time without your knowledge if you grant it camera permissions. Read More >>