technology
5 Stupid Mistakes to Avoid When Buying New Tech

We’re all fans of new gadgets, whether cutting-edge TVs or flagship smartphones, but you shouldn’t let your lust for shiny hardware overwhelm your common sense—there’s more to every purchase than a product name and a bottom line price. Here are the five mistakes people make that lead to wasted money and terrible buyer’s remorse when picking up new gadgets, and the easy fixes for making better buys. Read More >>

transport
Following Boris’s Channel Bridge Proposal, Here’s 9 More Bridges and Tunnels That Could Unite Countries and Continents

Boris Johnson is not a details-oriented politician. He's a man with a vision - and no matter how stupid that vision is, he has form for making it a reality: You only have to look at London's stupid cable car, or the super expensive new buses that actually reduce capacity compared to the bendy buses that came before, to see that. (And if you think the cable car is good, then I have a garden bridge to sell you.) Read More >>

internet
How to Use Your Smartphone to Diagnose Bad Wi-Fi

Bad wi-fi got you down? You’ve got a host of hardware options that can help you out, from mesh routers to Wi-Fi repeaters, but before you upgrade any setup, do some detective work—with some carefully chosen apps you can work out where your wi-fi network is failing and come up with better possible solutions. Read More >>

health
New AI System Predicts How Long Patients Will Live With Startling Accuracy

By using an artificially intelligent algorithm to predict patient mortality, a research team from Stanford University is hoping to improve the timing of end-of-life care for critically ill patients. In tests, the system proved eerily accurate, correctly predicting mortality outcomes in 90 per cent of cases. But while the system is able to predict when a patient might die, it still cannot tell doctors how it came to its conclusion. Read More >>

nuclear war
How Americans of the 1960s Really Felt About Nuclear Fallout Shelters

If you had to guess the percentage of American households that had a fallout shelter in the 1960s, what would you say? 50 percent? 25 percent? As low as 10 percent? In reality, just 1.4 percent of Americans had a nuclear fallout shelter in 1962. And the study that gave us that figure provides a fascinating look into the mindset of Americans during the Cold War. Read More >>

ces 2018
The Coolest Stuff We Saw at CES 2018

The world’s biggest whirlwind of tech, startups, and wild fever dreams is finally over, at least for this year. But before we close the book on CES 2018, we wanted to call attention to some of the coolest, most exciting things we saw at the show. That’s because even in a down year that saw less new laptops, and the hottest tech trend (for the second year in a row) was companies trying to shove Alexa or Google Assistant into every single device, there’s still a lot to look forward to over the next 12 months. Read More >>

technology
28 Secret Mouse and Trackpad Shortcuts You Probably Didn’t Know About

Operating a mouse or trackpad is super easy, but behind their simple exteriors these intuitive input devices hide a whole host of shortcuts and extra features that aren’t immediately obvious—and if you don’t already know about them, you’re missing out. Here are our favourites. Read More >>

science
Humans, Not Rats, May Have Been Responsible for Spreading the Black Death

The Black Death, a plague responsible for killing around a third of the population of Europe during the 14th century, spread to millions of humans by rats that carried infected fleas—right? That’s the story we’ve long been told by historians. A new study upends this conventional thinking, however, showing that humans, and not rodents, were the primary spreaders of the dreaded disease. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook Knows How to Track You Using the Dust on Your Camera Lens

Facebook has long said that it doesn’t use location data to make friend suggestions, but that doesn’t mean it hasn’t thought about using it. Read More >>

anime
Why Some Fans Watch Anime at Double Speed

Some have called it a myth. Others say it’s an elaborate trolling campaign. And the handful of mega-otakus who claim to actually engage in it don’t quite understand what all the fuss is about; yet, every now and then, you’ll see it crop up again and again on anime forums all across the internet, drawing paragraphs of rage, bile, and outright confusion. All this for a practice that affects no one but the person who decides to do it: watching anime at anything other than the default speed. Read More >>

how to
How to Easily Switch Your Two-Factor Security to a New Phone

When you’re switching phones after an upgrade or an accident, the job of checking up on your two-factor verification apps can get lost in the hustle of transferring photos, contacts, messages, and all the other stuff that more quickly comes to mind. Without your security codes, though, you might get locked out of your key online accounts—here’s how to make sure that doesn’t happen. Read More >>

virtual reality
CES 2018: The First Standalone VR Headset From Google and Lenovo Is a Beauty

Every major VR player has made the same promise. A VR headset that would be completely wireless. One that would let you go anywhere without tripping over cords or being tethered to a computer/phone/PS4. Google, which has spent more than a year quietly improving its VR platform, Daydream, is now the first company to cross the standalone finish line. The Daydream-powered Lenovo Mirage Solo is a beauty. Read More >>

nvidia
This Huge Screen Looks Like a TV, But It’s Actually a Specialised Gaming Monitor

This might look like a TV. It’s a big 65-inch display capable of HDR and putting out 1000 nits of brightness. It even uses a quantum dot film to achieve DCI-P3 colour gamut, which is nerd speak for really good color reproduction that’s usually only found super expensive TVs. But this display is one of three new Big Format Gaming Displays Nvidia announced at CES. This thing is meant to be a gaming monitor first, and yes, shockingly, that does make a difference. Read More >>

science
23andMe Wants to Tell You How to Lose Weight

The quest to figure out the right diet for maintaining an optimal weight is often less a quest and more a life-long battle. We cycle through fad diet after fad diet, hoping to eventually one day strike diet gold. Now, the consumer DNA testing company 23andMe is hoping to cut out some of the mystery of dieting, providing consumers with personalised weight loss advice as part of its genetic reports. Read More >>

giz asks
Why Does Exercise Start Hurting Two Days After a Workout?

If you’ve decided, this year, to start working out, you might have noticed a strange phenomenon: You’ll leave the gym feeling fine, and then two days later wake up sore. This weird time-lag appears unique to exercise, and is, when you think about it, kind of inexplicable—like stubbing your toe, feeling nothing, and then two days later suddenly yelping in pain. Read More >>