movies
How Detective Pikachu Built Its Adorable Star

For visual effects house MPC, Pikachu stood as the ultimate thesis for its approach to designing the world of Pokémon for Detective Pikachu. Gizmodo recently spoke to MPC VFX supervisor Pete Dionne about his work on Detective Pikachu, and the particular challenges behind bringing the most vital Pokémon to life. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook Invented a New Unit of Time

Sometimes it’s easy to forget that Facebook, as a company, is meant to be an innovator in fields beyond surveillance. But the announcement that it has created an entirely new unit of time is a nice reminder that the enormous company, which owns both WhatsApp and Oculus VR, is more than just one of the largest spy apparatuses in history. Read More >>

film
How Scene Transitions Make The Matrix Tight As Heck

The Matrix is one of those films that’s tough to see with a fresh pair of eyes. Not only is it the kind of film that burns itself into your memory but the subsequent sequels were so messy that it’s easy to forget just how tight the storytelling in the first film is. One of the biggest reasons for this is its flawless use of scene transitions. Read More >>

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How to End a Film the Right Way

A film’s ending is dessert; it’s the last impression a film makes on you before you leave the cinema, and that’s what makes it so important. If it doesn’t appropriately encapsulate and comment on the events of the last two hours, everyone goes home with a bad taste in their mouths. Read More >>

movies
How Movies Cleverly Tilt the Camera Angle to Influence What We See and Feel

The Dutch angle is a film technique where the camera is tilted a bit so that the shot looks purposely off. What's happening in the shot is not parallel to the frame, it’s at an angle instead. The Dutch angle heightens tension and is disorientating and can make us uneasy (to match the character’s uneasiness). It’s an interesting technique that can also be terribly abused. Read More >>

design
How Mask Makers Turn Silicone Into Glorious Guts and Gore

If you're looking for ideas on how to transform yourself into a disease-ridden horned demon this month, you'll want to head behind-the-scenes at Immortal Masks. The Hollywood-based company designs high-end creature masks for special effects teams in film. Or anyone who wants to seriously scare the shit out of trick-or-treaters. Read More >>

drones
Hollywood is Now Allowed to Use Commercial Drones to Shoot Movies

The US Federal Aviation Administration just granted its approval for six film and TV production companies to use drones on set. This is just the second time the agency's approved the use of commercial UAVs, it's no surprise Hollywood was first in line. Read More >>

star wars
17 Works of Art That Will Hang in George Lucas’s New Museum

There was a great disturbance in the Force this week as George Lucas announced he's locating his new art museum in Chicago instead of San Francisco. But Lucas's art isn't all Millennium Falcon models: there are some seriously fascinating pieces in his collection, all themed around the concept of storytelling. Read More >>

photography
This New Camera Stabiliser Could Change Cinematography Forever

A new piece of filmmaking gear was just announced that could completely re-invent the complex process of camera stabilisation. It's currently being tested and endorsed by Vincent LaForet, who's given us a little taste of what it's capable of. Read More >>

apps
Hollywood-Backed iOS App Vyclone Pioneers Social iFilmmaking

The video featured above was created with Vyclone, the filmmaking app for iPhone and iPad that launches publicly today. Read More >>

cameras
A Hefty Flywheel Makes This Dolly a Smooth Operator

A few simple camera moves can make your low-budget film look like a Hollywood feature. And thanks to a heavy steel flywheel at its core, the Polly Dolly ensures smooth tracking and dolly shots with just a single finger's push. Read More >>

movies
Cheaper Digital Face Transplants For Filmmakers On a Budget

It's a modern filmmaking technique that's been used in big-budget Hollywood features for years now, but a Harvard comp-sci student has developed software that does digital face replacements without the need for a skilled effects artist, reducing its cost. Read More >>