science
Hippo Poo is Suffocating Fish in East Africa

Usually, dumping fish-killing garbage into rivers is a human’s job. But hippos seem to be doing it, too, through their routine mass pooping events. Read More >>

science
This Bizarre Fish Hides a Nasty Switchblade on Its Cheek

The scientists who discovered the strange feature are calling it a “lachrymal sabre,” but for the predators who dare to mess with this type of stonefish, the unique switchblade just means trouble. Read More >>

ecology
The Great Dolphin-Human War Is Inching Closer

After all of those years of humans holding dolphins in shackles, mocking them with cutesy depictions in the media, and forcing them to do tricks under inhumane conditions at theme parks, the cetaceans may finally have their revenge. They’re attacking our fisheries. Read More >>

science
First-Ever Footage of Anglerfish Mating Is as Horrifying as You’d Imagine

>Deep sea anglerfish look like some kind of tragic holdover from the Precambrian Era, with their large head, dead eyes, fang-like teeth, and glowing “fishing rod” that extends from their dorsal fin. Scientists had never actually seen these creatures mate in the wild, but sadly, that’s no longer case. It is with our deepest regrets that we present to you the very first footage of anglerfish boning. Read More >>

robots
Scientists Use Nintendo Controller-Guided Robot Fish to Spy on Real Fish

The ocean covers more than two-thirds of our planet, and there’s so much of it left unexplored. How are we humans supposed to blend in to uncover all of its secrets, when our observation tools are hooked to clunky vehicles with fish-scaring propellers and jets? Read More >>

science
First Evidence that Microplastics Travel Up the Food Chain and Into Seal Bellies

You’re familiar with the food chain: little fish eats plankton, bigger fish eats the little fish, then a seal eats the bigger fish, thus consuming the energy from all three smaller animals. But what if the little fish had also eaten an indigestible piece of plastic? New evidence demonstrates the plastic could make it all the way up the food chain into the seal. Read More >>

science
These Freaky Fish Can Turn Their Eyes Into Flashlights

At slightly less than two inches long, triplefin fish don’t seem like much of a threat. But as new research shows, these aquatic carnivores have a rare organ that turns their eyes into veritable flashlights—an ability they can switch on when needed. Read More >>

ads
Captain Birdseye’s a Hunky Silver Fox Now

The old, grey, marginally repulsive, Santa-like Captain Birdseye is long gone, with this latest reinvention of the baffling figurehead of fish fingers seeing the captain transformed in a hot 50-something suspiciously fit, supposed grandad. Read More >>

science
The World’s Loudest Fish Is Now a Victim of Its Own Unique Talent

Each year, over a million Gulf corvina swim to their spawning grounds along the Colorado River Delta. These fish are famous for their loud, chattering sounds, and when corvina gather together in massive conglomerations, the noise they produce is deafening. Literally. New research shows that the sounds produced by these fish when spawning are the loudest ever recorded for a single fish—an extraordinary display of nature that’s now being turned against the species. Read More >>

science
For Fish Penises, Bigger Isn’t Always Better

When it comes to reproduction, most fish are external fertilisers, crop dusting eggs in a cloud of sperm. But swordtails (Xiphophorus) aren’t like most fish. These fish fertilise eggs internally and “give birth” to live young. To help this whole operation, males have evolved external genitalia for transferring sperm—a tool not typical among fish. Naturally, the next question would be—for swordtails at least—is bigger better? After all, they went through all the trouble of evolving penises in the first place. New research on the matter of female swordtail preferences towards their males’ members provides an answer: not necessarily. Yes, size is important, but so is how the males use it—and only when females are healthy enough to be in a discerning position. Read More >>

food
Hang On, Cod Might be Doomed Again

Just when we thought it was safe to eat the nice types of fish in the chip shop again instead of the flabby soggy ones Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall says are acceptable, our lovely cod is back on the danger list. Read More >>

science
Fish Are Eating Small Bits of Plastic Because It Smells Delicious

Each year, our civilisation pours around eight million tons of plastic into the ocean, a portion of which ends up in the bellies of fish, and by consequence, our dinner plates. New research suggests that at least one species of fish isn’t ingesting this plastic debris by chance—they’re actually attracted to the smell. Read More >>

science
Newly Discovered Giant Sea Pancake Looks Goofy as Hell

Sunfish are the living, breathing incarnate of a dad joke—it’s kind of funny, but you feel disappointed in yourself for laughing at it because it’s painfully silly. Known as the world’s largest bony fish, ocean sunfish—which make up the genus mola—look like a drunk person’s rendition of a fish, or rather, a person who’s never seen a fish’s rendition of a fish. Read More >>

animals
Sad New Deep Sea Shark Reminds Us We Can’t All Be Great Whites

The tiger shark patrols the seas alone at night, prepared to eat anything from a bird to a dolphin. The goblin shark live in the ocean’s canyons and abysses, grabbing prey by surprise with its extendable jaws. A great white shark can grow as large as a Mercedes. Read More >>

science
A Staggering Amount of Fish is Wasted Each Year

New research shows that industrial fisheries are responsible for dumping nearly 10 million tonnes of perfectly good fish back into the ocean each year — enough to fill 4,500 Olympic-sized swimming pools. This news comes at a time when nearly 90 percent of the world’s fish stocks are threatened by overfishing. Read More >>