science
For Fish Penises, Bigger Isn’t Always Better

When it comes to reproduction, most fish are external fertilisers, crop dusting eggs in a cloud of sperm. But swordtails (Xiphophorus) aren’t like most fish. These fish fertilise eggs internally and “give birth” to live young. To help this whole operation, males have evolved external genitalia for transferring sperm—a tool not typical among fish. Naturally, the next question would be—for swordtails at least—is bigger better? After all, they went through all the trouble of evolving penises in the first place. New research on the matter of female swordtail preferences towards their males’ members provides an answer: not necessarily. Yes, size is important, but so is how the males use it—and only when females are healthy enough to be in a discerning position. Read More >>

food
Hang On, Cod Might be Doomed Again

Just when we thought it was safe to eat the nice types of fish in the chip shop again instead of the flabby soggy ones Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall says are acceptable, our lovely cod is back on the danger list. Read More >>

science
Fish Are Eating Small Bits of Plastic Because It Smells Delicious

Each year, our civilisation pours around eight million tons of plastic into the ocean, a portion of which ends up in the bellies of fish, and by consequence, our dinner plates. New research suggests that at least one species of fish isn’t ingesting this plastic debris by chance—they’re actually attracted to the smell. Read More >>

science
Newly Discovered Giant Sea Pancake Looks Goofy as Hell

Sunfish are the living, breathing incarnate of a dad joke—it’s kind of funny, but you feel disappointed in yourself for laughing at it because it’s painfully silly. Known as the world’s largest bony fish, ocean sunfish—which make up the genus mola—look like a drunk person’s rendition of a fish, or rather, a person who’s never seen a fish’s rendition of a fish. Read More >>

animals
Sad New Deep Sea Shark Reminds Us We Can’t All Be Great Whites

The tiger shark patrols the seas alone at night, prepared to eat anything from a bird to a dolphin. The goblin shark live in the ocean’s canyons and abysses, grabbing prey by surprise with its extendable jaws. A great white shark can grow as large as a Mercedes. Read More >>

science
A Staggering Amount of Fish is Wasted Each Year

New research shows that industrial fisheries are responsible for dumping nearly 10 million tonnes of perfectly good fish back into the ocean each year — enough to fill 4,500 Olympic-sized swimming pools. This news comes at a time when nearly 90 percent of the world’s fish stocks are threatened by overfishing. Read More >>

science
Lionfish Are Eating Fish We Didn’t Even Know Existed

Lionfish have very low standards and will eat anything in sight. Although they’re originally from the Indian and Western Pacific Oceans, these vacuum cleaners have been flopping around the Atlantic for the last 25 years, probably because people dumped them from their home aquariums. They’re so stupidly hungry and abundant that sometimes, they just eat other lionfish. This would be fine if these venomous beasts just kept to themselves, but because they have very few predators in their new home, lionfish get to ruin everything else around them, too. Seriously, they’re such a nightmare that scientists are trying to fight them with robots. Read More >>

science
Ten Horrifying Deep Sea Creatures, Ranked

The depths of the ocean are festooned with the most nightmarish creatures imaginable. You might think you’re safe, because these critters live thousands of feet down in a cold dark abyss, but the vampire squid, which looks like a nightmare umbrella, and the frilled shark—a literal living fossil—will live on in the recesses of your mind long after you’ve clicked away. Enjoy these deep sea horrors and try to have a relaxing day afterward. Read More >>

science
Smart Female Guppies Don’t Wind Up With Losers

Guppies might look like mindless, mouth-breathing little bastards, but it turns out some of them make better dating decisions than we do. No, really—these tiny fish, with their infinitesimal brains, are somehow more discerning with their mates than us, and we literally invented rockets. And Doritos. Read More >>

food
Stop Having Haddock In Your Fish & Chips, Says MCS

Sea creature charity the Marine Conservation Society (MCS) has announced today that haddock from the North Sea and West Scotland is no longer on their list of sustainable fish that it's OK to eat. Read More >>

science
Wild Fish Might Be Eaten By Predators Because We’ve Accidentally Put Them On Prozac

It turns out humans have been accidentally medicating fish and wildlife with antidepressants. Read More >>

science
Theory: Fish Grew Legs Because Their Eyes Got Big Enough To See Snacks On Land

For the first time, a study has persuasively argued that our water-based ancestors made the move from sea to land because their eyes grew and suddenly they could see all the tasty goodness on the shore. Read More >>

wtf
This Deep Sea Monster Attaches Its Head to Its Neck in the Freakiest Way

We already knew the deep ocean is full of nightmare creatures — twisted amalgams of tooth, jaw and fin sprung to life from some tortured corner of the multiverse. But good news — it gets even weirder! Scientists have just learned that one deep sea predator has a flexible attachment between its head and its skull that allows it to snap its jaws open like a Pez dispenser. Read More >>

science
Fish Pee On Each Other to Show Who’s Boss

Animals, like humans, communicate in lots of different ways. One of those ways, in animals as in humans, involves urinating on one another. Read More >>

environment
The Paris Climate Agreement Could Save Commercial Fishing 

Saving seaside towns isn’t the only business benefit of fighting climate change. Scientists think that adhering to the Paris Agreement could be crucial to the success of the commercial fishing industry. Read More >>