fitness trackers
Unreliable Fitness Trackers Add 10 Miles to Your Marathon Route

Listen up, marathon runners: the fitness tracker you use to record your training really matters. A new report by Which? has shown that some of the big name trackers on the market are actually rubbish at recording distance, and can have you running miles more than you need to. Read More >>

fitbit
You Won’t Miss the Features Cut From the Fitbit Versa Lite

Buying a smartwatch can be intimidating. They’re expensive, most of them come with similar features, and it can be difficult for first-timers to navigate the technobabble marketing speak to find a smartwatch that suits their needs. That’s exactly the issue Fitbit is trying to solve with its Versa Lite Edition. At £150, it’s less than half the price of a GPS-only Apple Watch Series 4 and aside from push notifications, it doesn’t really mess with more complicated smart features, like ECG readings and voice assistants. Read More >>

wearables
Fitbit’s Newest Inspire Fitness Trackers Fail To Do Just That

Despite what wearables makers would have you think, it’s not just all smartwatches. There’s still a place for the humble fitness tracker. For starters, they’re much cheaper than smartwatches, provide accurate fitness tracking, have better battery life, and are perfectly adequate at delivering push notifications. This basically sums up Fitbit’s new flagship fitness trackers, the Inspire and Inspire HR. Read More >>

wearables
Fitbit’s Cheap New Trackers Seriously Undercut the Apple Watch

Apple might dominate when it comes to smartwatch sales, but Fitbit’s looking to make a dent in its lead by launching four new devices today: the Fitbit Versa Lite Edition, the Inspire and Inspire HR, and the Ace 2. As its name suggests, the Versa Lite is a streamlined version of its popular Versa smartwatch. Meanwhile, the Inspire and Inspire HR will replace Fitbit’s lower end trackers, and the Ace 2 is an updated version of its child-friendly tracker. But the real kicker is that none of them cost over £150—less than half the cost of a GPS-only Apple Watch Series 4. Read More >>

microsoft
If You Own a Microsoft Band and Were Still Using It Until 1 March, You Might Be Owed a Refund

Microsoft’s Band smartwatch and fitness tracker—production of which was mercifully discontinued in 2016—has finally reached the end of its lifespan. The Verge reported that Microsoft has announced its intention to sever all remaining support for the Band on 31 May 2019, with both backend services and the apps being yanked from Microsoft Store, Google Play, and the Apple App Store. Read More >>

ces 2019
CES 2019: Matrix’s Body Heat-Powered Watch Finally Adds Useful Smart Features

One of the biggest gripes with smartwatches is battery life. That’s what made the original Matrix PowerWatch and its successor, the PowerWatch X, compelling – a fitness-oriented smartwatch fully powered by the heat generated from your own body? It was an intriguing concept to say the least, even if we found the PowerWatch X less than stellar once it hit shelves. Read More >>

gadgets
Why People Are Putting Fitness Trackers on Toilet Roll in China

It all started with a mystery: Why would a fitness tracker detect a beating heart on a toilet roll? Read More >>

fitbit
Fitbit’s Charge 3 Actually Seems Like a Solid Smartwatch Alternative

The Fitbit Charge 3 seems shockingly light. That’s going to be the first thing that really strikes you about this fitness tracker. You pick it up and it lacks all the heft you’re accustomed to for a device like the Charge 2 or its predecessor. It’s lighter than my Apple Watch too, which is impressive because Fitbit has crammed an awful lot of features into the device while also giving it a redesign that makes it infinitely more attractive than the rest of the Charge line. Read More >>

privacy
Workout Data From Fitness App Used to Identify Government Spies and Military Personnel

In the latest incident of seemingly innocuous data sharing leading to potentially dangerous exposure, the popular fitness app and activity trackers Polar Flow has been revealing the location of military and government personnel working at sensitive locations, according to ZDNet. Read More >>

wearables
Fitness App’s ‘Anonymised’ Data Dump Accidentally Reveals US Military Bases Around the World

People around the world use the app Strava on their smartphones and Fitbits to track how far they run. But researchers have discovered that an “anonymised” data dump released by Strava last year has accidentally revealed sensitive locations, including US military bases around the world. Read More >>

consumer tech
Do Not Buy a Fitbit for Someone You Love

You are going to find yourself idling on a fine website like Gizmodo or wandering through some shop like Currys or Argos, and you are going to remember you need to buy a gift for a loved one. You are going to remember, one time while you were at Nando's scoffing down half a chicken that they said they were feeling unhealthy and wanted a Fitbit. You are going to try to buy them one because the fitness tracker starts at just £55 and that is affordable. Read More >>

research
This Wireless Wall Device Will Literally Monitor Your Every Step

For years, we’ve been told that strapping a fitness tracker to your wrist is a great way to track your physical activity and fitness level. But researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have come up with a non-invasive, non-wearable way to do the same thing—and more accurately—using invisible wireless signals. Read More >>

gadgets
Most of Us Don’t Need a Fitness Tracker

Fitness trackers aren’t what they used to be. The fad gadget you strap to your wrist has seen a precipitous fall in the last year. Pebble closed its doors after releasing a solid fitness tracker, and Fitbit has struggled (though we liked its new Fitbit Alta HR). There’s also the fact that fitness trackers, while great for athletes, seem to not actually help most of us lose weight. Read More >>

reviews
Fitbit Alta HR Is the Best Fitness Tracker for Normal People

Let’s face it, the world of fitness trackers has plateaued. Most people who want a fitness tracker already have one, and more than a few of us have old trackers shoved away in a drawer, useless because the charging cable mysteriously disappeared, or because the company who made it decided it didn’t care anymore and killed the software (RIP Nike FuelBand). Read More >>