gaming
You’ll Be Able to Use an Xbox Adaptive Controller With Google Stadia

Earlier this week, Google revealed Stadia, a platform which aims to allow game streaming on any device with a Chrome browser. A lot of the presentation focused on the speed of games booting up, or the convenience of playing with any controller on any device, but in among the big reveals was a small but vitally important announcement about controllers. Read More >>

google
How Will Google Overcome Stadia’s Biggest Obstacle?

The problem with a gaming platform that relies entirely on the internet is that it relies on the internet. Stadia, Google’s new streaming game platform, will require that users have a robust internet connection to work, and that’s a big problem. “It’s what has plagued game streaming from the beginning,” said Pat Moorhead, Principal Analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy. A game streaming service simply can’t work if there’s lag. And in America, there’s a lot of lag. Read More >>

google
Google Made Chromecast Cool Again

At Gizmodo, there are few things more rewarding than eating your own words. So here I am. It’s been six months since I reviewed the apparently boring new Google Chromecast, a gadget I said “falls short” and called “a bummer.” New Google has effectively turned the Chromecast into the video game console of the future. This is me eating my own words. Read More >>

gaming
Oculus Rift S Supports Room Scale VR Without External Base Stations, Coming This Spring

Over the past month or so, we've been hearing a lot of rumblings about an alleged new VR headset being developed by Oculus. Now, thanks to a GDC reveal and trailer, that rumoured headset has an official name, release window, and list of improvements. Read More >>

google
Stadia Will Need “Approximately 25 Mbps” Internet Speeds, According to Google Boss

Last night, Google lifted the lid on its big, secret video game project: Stadia, a streaming service designed to bring the biggest games to anyone, regardless of the device they're using – as long as it has a Chrome browser or it supports Chromecast Read More >>

google
How Much Would You Pay for a Holy Grail Google Stadia Subscription?

Yesterday was the big coming out party for Stadia, Google’s upcoming game streaming platform that promises to let you play games over the internet on practically any device, and hopefully lag-free. Read More >>

gaming
Ray Tracing Is Coming to a Whole Lot of GPUs

If you thought ray tracing was only going to be possible on Nvidia’s pricey line of Turing GPUs you would be wrong. Today the company has announced ray tracing support for a wide range of GPUs ranging from the Nvidia GTX 1060 all the way up to the super beefy Titan V. The 1060 can notably be found for as little as £200 and its price is expected to drop even further. Read More >>

google
Hey Google, Nobody Asked For Google Assistant In Their Games

So, Google’s Stadia game streaming service is here. Along with it comes the all-new Stadia-specific controllers. And on that nifty controller is a button that allows you to launch Google Assistant. What? Read More >>

gaming
Google Stadia’s Only Hardware Is This Special Controller

Today, Google announced its new Stadia game streaming platform that lets gamers play games on pretty much anything with an internet connection. Laptops, desktops, phones, and even TVs with a Chromecast Ultra attached are all supported. That means there’s no need to go out and buy a new console to get access to Stadia, but surely, Stadia must have some sort of proprietary hardware right? Read More >>

gaming
All the Detail About Stadia, Google’s Huge Bet on the Future of Gaming

Google is taking on the big guys. In a keynote at Game Developers Conference in San Francisco today Google announced a new service, Stadia, that will allow gamers to play the biggest games on any Android or Chrome-based device (including any device with a Chrome browser). Read More >>

gaming
This 65-Inch PC Gaming Monitor Burned My Eyes in the Good Way

You’ve sat too close to the TV. Or to the screen at the cinema. Everything warps when you get up close. People become giants. The screen seems to go on forever. Everything takes on that 8-bit video game look as you can see the sharp outline of each pixel. But have you ever sat too close to a computer monitor? Can you remember a time you put your nose to that screen and felt like it was too close—too much? If you answer is “no,” might I interest you in the HP Omen X Emperium 65? It’s 65 beautiful inches of display that HP thinks gamers will happily drop £3,500 for. It is at once far, far too much screen for a mere computer, and it is gluttonously just enough. Read More >>

gaming
These Are the Six Nominees for the EE Mobile Game of the Year

It's the inaugural year of the EE Mobile Game of the Year category at the BAFTA Games Awards, and the nominees are pretty much exactly what you're expecting except for the lack of PUBG: Read More >>

gadgets
Nvidia Will End Support for Its 3D Glasses, an Incredible Technology You Definitely Use

Remember back when 3D TVs, movies, live sporting events, and glasses were a thing? Yeah, well, Nvidia realises you don’t either, and as a result, it’s pulling support for 3D Vision, its platform for gaming with 3D glasses. Read More >>

playstation
Finally, iOS Users Can Get PS4 Remote Play

Big news in PlayStation world: iPhone and iPad users can finally use the official PS4 Remote Play app that Xperia users have had for about five years (not an exaggeration). Read More >>

gaming
Nintendo Does VR Now, Again

The Nintendo Switch already felt like the best part of a VR experience thanks to the wizardry of the Joy-Con controllers in some games, but now it’s going full VR. Tonight the company announced the Nintendo Labo: VR Kit, an $80 (UK price TBA) Labo kit that lets users build a VR headset out of cardboard. This is the first major foray into VR for the company since the 1995 Virtual Boy. Read More >>