science
Einstein’s Theory of Gravity Holds Up on Test of a Three-Star System

Scientists understand gravity pretty well when it comes to two objects, but add a third, and you’ve got chaos—a system that’s impossible to explain with our simplest equations. But you also have a way to test the limits of Einstein’s theory of gravity. Read More >>

general relativity
Einstein’s Theory of Gravity Passes Enormous Test on a Galaxy

It would be hard to overstate how resilient the theory of general relativity has been. In its hundred-plus-year history, it’s managed to predict things far beyond the capabilities of 1910s experiments, and it withstands every new test scientists throw at it. Read More >>

space
We Might Be a Tiny Bit Wrong About Mercury’s Orbit 

It turns out we may have Mercury’s orbit wrong. Not by much, but by enough that a future mission can measure it, test Albert Einstein’s landmark theory of general relativity, and further refine its mathematics Read More >>

science
This Single Image Profoundly Sums Up Einstein’s Landmark Theory

You might think you have gravity pretty well figured out. If you drop a ball out of a window, a short time later it will hit the ground. The higher up you drop it, the faster it travels before it hits the ground. Read More >>

science
Test of Einstein’s Theory Shows the Sun Is Losing Mass

Mercury, the closest planet to the sun, has a history of helping us study gravity. Albert Einstein demonstrated that Newton’s laws of motion break down when dealing with very large masses. He created his theory of general relativity to account for this: gravity is a manifestation of the warping of space-time caused by massive bodies like the sun. Mercury’s orbit shows this warping most clearly—and, indeed, before Einstein’s work, scientists were long puzzled by its strangeness, even attributing it to gravitational effects from a made-up planet called Vulcan. Now, a team of researchers in the US are using new measurements of Mercury’s orbit to learn more about the sun—and more about Einstein’s theory itself. Read More >>

science
Einstein’s Theory Passes a Massive Test

The most basic physical laws you’ve learned—those drafted up by Isaac Newton in the 17th century—don’t work for everything. Once you try to applying them to really fast things moving nearly at the speed of light or things heavier than stars, they start to fall apart. That’s where Albert Einstein’s expanded theory of motion and gravity, the theory of general relativity, comes in. Read More >>

science
Scientists Just Observed an Effect of Gravity on Tiny Particles For the First Time

Bad news: humans will probably never explore the area around a black hole, at least while you’re alive. That’s mostly because most black holes are too far away, and even if we could travel to them, it’s unlikely we’d survive their gravitational pull. That means that if we want to study the wacky effects extreme gravity might have, we’ve gotta get creative—which is exactly what an international team of physicists have just done. Read More >>

science
Scientists Weigh a Star Using Gravity, Proving Einstein Wrong by Proving Him Right

Albert Einstein’s theory of gravity, called general relativity, is probably the best physics theory ever formulated. It just keeps working, often for things Einstein himself didn’t believe, like the accelerating expansion of the universe. Scientists only just proved some of its crazy predictions, like gravitational waves. Read More >>

science
Your Questions About Gravitational Waves, Answered

Last week's big announcement on the discovery of gravitational waves will raise many questions for the casual science observer. And Dr. Amber Stuver of the LIGO Livingston Observatory in Louisiana is here today with some answers. Read More >>

science
We’ve Found Gravitational Waves. Now What?

David Reitze, executive director of the LIGO Laboratory, took the podium at the National Press Building in Washington, DC, this morning, and said the words we’ve all been waiting on tenterhooks to hear: “We have discovered gravitational waves.” And a packed auditorium in Caltech’s Cahill building in Pasadena — where people had gathered to watch the live feed – erupted into wild applause. Read More >>

science
Rumours Are Flying That We Finally Found Gravitational Waves 

Excited rumours began circulating on Twitter this morning that a major experiment designed to hunt for gravitational waves—ripples in the fabric of spacetime first predicted by Albert Einstein—has observed them directly for the very first time. If confirmed, this would be one of the most significant physics discoveries of the last century. Read More >>

science
Fun Animation Celebrates 100 Years of General Relativity

Perhaps you’ve noticed some recent fuss over Albert Einstein and his famous general theory of relativity, which turned 100 years old this week. Who better to give you a glimpse into what the theory is all about than a Time Lord — the Tenth Doctor himself? Read More >>

space
Astronomers Discover First Direct Proof of the Big Bang Expansion

Somebody's going to win a Nobel Prize. At least that's what the physics community is saying after the announcement on Monday that a Harvard team has found the first direct evidence of cosmic inflation right after the Big Bang. It's more proof that the Big Bang really was the beginning of it all. Read More >>

space
The Various Ways to Die Inside a Black Hole

Falling into a black hole never sounded like fun. How could it? Black holes are the darkest places in the universe, where not even light can escape the singularity's immense gravitational pull. It wouldn't be fun. But what, exactly, would happen? Read More >>