science
Hundreds of Giant Seafloor Craters Produced By Explosive Methane Farts

Researchers working in the Barents Sea have discovered hundreds of craters on the Arctic Sea floor, some measuring over a kilometre in width. These craters, which date back to the end of the last Ice Age, were formed when large reserves of methane exploded in the wake of retreating ice sheets. Because methane is a potent greenhouse gas, this discovery is a potential warning of things to come in our warming world. Read More >>

science
How Does a 110-Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Still Have Its Skin?

An arresting image of a “mummified” dinosaur went viral this weekend after National Geographic broke the story of the 110-million-year-old armoured plant-eater, a newfound species of nodosaur whose exquisite remains are now on display in the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Alberta, Canada. Read More >>

science
The Original Brexit Was Probably Far More Catastrophic

Britain’s geographical isolation is one of the cornerstones of its identity which, combined with nationalist fervour, probably played at least some role in the our recent decision to depart from the European Union. But when the Isles first split from the rest of Europe hundreds of thousands years ago, things were considerably more violent. Read More >>

food
Our Greatest Geological Discovery Is This Chocolate Boulder With Edible Geodes Inside

If you thought Cadbury Creme Eggs were humanity’s greatest confectionery creation, Alex O’Brien Yeatts, a baking and pastry student at the Culinary Institute of America, has come up with a dessert that looks straight out of a geology textbook—not a cookbook. Read More >>

science
Scientists Found a New Window Into the Hellish Ancient Earth

Four and a half billion years ago, some dust from a cloud orbiting around a star coalesced into a rocky planet. But unlike most of the dusty balls in our solar system, this one was special—it was just the right distance away from the star that one day after the surface had cooled, water could exist as a liquid, rather than a solid or gas. The planet’s surface eventually fractured into plates that shifted around, becoming continents. All that shifting has rubbed away the details of that ancient Earth. Was the era as hellish as its name, “Hadean” implies, or was Earth always a water-rich orb with moving plates? Read More >>

science
Scientists Claim to Have Found Our Planet’s Oldest Fossils

An international team of researchers say they’ve found fossils dating back to at least 3.77 billion years ago, making them the oldest fossils ever found on our planet. The discovery, though sure to attract scrutiny, has implications for our understanding of how life got started on Earth—and how it may have emerged elsewhere. Read More >>

oroville dam
Good Luck Repairing the Badly Damaged Oroville Dam

For three weeks in February, torrents of water rushed down the emergency spillway at Oroville dam, prompting fears that the entire structure would collapse. New images show what’s left of the 3,000-foot long concrete spillway — and the tremendous challenge that now confronts repair crews. Read More >>

landslides
Enormous Mudslide Devastates New Zealand Marine Reserve

New Zealand’s Kaikoura Canyon — known for its abundant seabed life — is now an undersea wasteland following a series of earthquake-induced mudslides. Read More >>

science
Some Good News About the Worst Mass Extinction in Earth’s History

If the fact that the Earth is careening toward a sixth mass extinction event makes you uncomfortable, good news: it turns out, the biosphere may have rebounded “quickly” after the worst mass extinction in history. That, at least, is the implication of one remarkable fossil assemblage formed less than 2 million years after the so-called Great Dying. Read More >>

science
An Obscure Fault in Southern California is More Dangerous Than We Thought

A little-known fault underneath the southern Californian city of Santa Barbara is capable of producing stronger shaking and more damage during an earthquake than previously thought, according to new research. Called the Ventura-Pitas Point Fault, it’s now thought to be capable of producing magnitude 8.0 earthquakes, and even tsunamis. Read More >>

science
Enormous Pleistocene Landslide Discovered Off the Coast of Australia

Around 300,000 years ago, a ridge near Australia’s Great Barrier Reef collapsed, unleashing a massive undersea avalanche. The ensuing landslide scattered debris for miles and triggered a sizeable tsunami, according to new research. Read More >>

science
Hawaii’s Epic Lava ‘Fire Hose’ Has Returned With a Vengeance

Late last week, a cliff collapse extinguished the dramatic lava flow streaming out of Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano. We have some good news to report, however: It’s back! Some incredible new footage of the hellish gusher shows it’s alive and well. Read More >>

earth sciences
New Hampshire Might Have Volcanoes One Day

Sixty miles beneath the birch-speckled forests of southern New Hampshire, the rocks are hotter than they should be—much hotter. First discovered in the 1970s, the heat anomaly was thought to be the remnants of an ancient hotspot in the Earth’s mantle. Instead, new seismic measurements suggest it’s an area of active upwelling. And that has led geologists to an astonishing conclusion. Read More >>

geology
Two Billion-Year-Old Water Found in Canadian Mine

Canadian Geoscientists have uncovered water that dates back a whopping two billion years. It’s the oldest water ever discovered on Earth, and it could broaden our understanding of how life emerged on our planet — and possibly elsewhere. Read More >>

earthquakes
Huge Earthquake in the Pacific Sparks Tsunami Fears

A magnitude 7.8 earthquake has rocked the Solomon Islands about 42 miles off the coast of Kirakira. A subsequent Tsunami watch was issued for Hawaii, but was canceled. Areas close to the quake are also on tsunami alerts. Read More >>