environment
The American Midwest Looks Absolutely Drenched in This New Image From Space

Several states across the American Midwest are experiencing intensive flooding in the wake of unusually vigorous storm system that passed through earlier in the week. Images taken from above and on the ground show the extent of the record-breaking floods, which now threaten areas downstream. Read More >>

environment
A Second Giant Crack Has Appeared on Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf

A 80-mile-long crack along Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf has remained stable since February, but scientists have now detected a new branch, one that’s extending about six miles from the main rift. It seems like only a matter of time before the 2,000 square mile ice shelf plunges into the sea. Read More >>

science
We Just Found Out Antarctica Is Covered in Rivers

In 1908, Ernest Shackleton’s legendary Nimrod team was making its way toward the South Pole when the men were startled by something unexpected: the sound of liquid water, roaring across the frozen wasteland toward the sea. One hundred and nine years later, scientists can confirm that this sound, described by one early explorer as “odd after the usual Antarctic silence” was not a trick of the mens’ imaginations, nor was it a fluke. Hundreds of individual waterways gush across our planet’s ice-covered continent in the summertime, and they’ve been doing so for decades. Read More >>

science
Some Good News About the Worst Mass Extinction in Earth’s History

If the fact that the Earth is careening toward a sixth mass extinction event makes you uncomfortable, good news: it turns out, the biosphere may have rebounded “quickly” after the worst mass extinction in history. That, at least, is the implication of one remarkable fossil assemblage formed less than 2 million years after the so-called Great Dying. Read More >>

environment
What Happens When That Enormous Antarctic Ice Shelf Finally Breaks?

For the past few months, scientists have watched with bated breath as a rift in the Antarctic Peninsula’s Larsen C ice shelf grows longer by the day. Eventually, the rift will make a clean break, expelling a 2,000 square mile chunk of ice into the sea. It’ll be an epic sight to behold—but what happens after the ice is gone? Read More >>

earthquakes
Relive 15 Years of Earthquakes in Four Mesmerising Minutes

A few weeks ago, the US National Weather Service’s Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) released this soothing and terrifying animation of every earthquake it recorded from 1st January 2001 to 31st December 2015. Here’s my suggested backing track, and here’s how the video’s description says to read the map: Read More >>

mars
Enormous Water Ice Deposit Could Help Us Survive on Mars

Future Martian colonists, NASA just found you a reservoir. Frozen beneath a cracked and pitted region in Mars’ mid-northern latitudes lies a sheet of ice with about as much thirst-quenching potential as Lake Superior. Read More >>

space
NASA Didn’t Find Life on Mars—But It Did Find Something Very Cool

If we ever get proof of past life on Mars, it’ll come in the form of biosignatures, fingerprints that could only have been left by living organisms. We’re a long way from finding that smoking gun evidence, but an analysis of silica minerals discovered by NASA’s Spirit rover pushes us one step closer. Because of their similarity to silica deposits shaped by microbial life on Earth, these intriguing Martian minerals are now being called a “potential biosignature.” Read More >>

science
Why This Week’s Fukushima Earthquake Was an Aftershock From 2011

When a magnitude 6.9 earthquake rocked the Fukushima prefecture of Japan on Tuesday, fear swept the island nation that it could herald a repeat of the tsunami and nuclear disaster at Fukushima five years ago, both of which were caused by an enormous, magnitude 9.1 earthquake. Read More >>

space
Scientists Discovered a Mind-Boggling Chasm on Mercury

Placed on Earth, it would stretch from Washington DC to New York to Denver. Larger than the Grand Canyon, wider and deeper than East Africa’s Great Rift Valley, Mercury’s newly-discovered “Great Valley” boggles the imagination. But it’s more than size that makes this geologic feature remarkable. The Great Valley may be our best evidence that Mercury’s entire crust is contracting. Read More >>

science
Giant Volcano Appears to Be Filled With Water

Investigating a strange electrical anomaly, geologists have discovered an enormous water reservoir beneath the now-dormant Uturunco volcano in the Bolivian Andes. It’s a remarkable find that speaks to the vast amounts of water stored in Earth’s deep interior, possibly since our planet was formed. Read More >>

environment
The West Antarctic Ice Sheet Is Wasting Away Very Quickly

On an forbidding shoreline at the bottom of the world, the prodigious ice sheets of West Antarctica dead-end in the Amundsen sea. For decades, scientists have been monitoring this interface of rock, ice and ocean, in order to understand how quickly it’ll retreat as the planet warms up. A new study shows that three of the Amundsen sea’s frozen gateways are melting away faster than we realised, raising the spectre of an ice sheet collapse that could trigger several feet of global sea level rise. Read More >>

science
Our Atmosphere Is Leaking Oxygen and Scientists Don’t Know Why

It’s nothing to lose sleep over—really, I promise—but Earth’s atmosphere is leaking oxygen. Atmospheric oxygen levels have dropped by 0.7 per cent over the past 800,000 years, and while scientists aren’t sure why, they’re rather excited about it. Read More >>

environment
Dramatic Visualisations Show Just How Quickly the Arctic Is Melting

On September 10th, the Arctic hit its annual summertime ice minimum. According to the National Snow and Ice Data Center, it was the second lowest summertime low since satellite record-keeping began. And as a series of new visualisations show, this trend is not going anywhere. Read More >>

environment
A Volcanic Eruption Hid a Critical Climate Signal for Twenty Years

As our planet heats up, the pace of sea level rise is expected to quicken, making it harder for cities like Miami to stay above water. But since 1992, scientists have studied Earth’s mean sea level via satellites, and they’ve watched it rise at a steady 3 millimetres per year—no evidence for acceleration. Read More >>