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Physicists Spot Four Black Hole Collisions, Including the Largest One Ever Recorded

Physicists have spotted four new instances of black holes colliding and sending their gravitational waves toward the Earth, including the most massive collision recorded to date. Read More >>

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Astronomers Find Evidence of Thousands of Black Holes at the Center of Our Galaxy

Astronomers have long predicted that as many as 20,000 black holes could be hiding in our galaxy’s centre, but so far no one has been able to spot them. Until now. Read More >>

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Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatory Passes Huge Test

Gravitational waves may be the most exciting thing in astronomy right now, but there are only so many things in space that scientists can study with Earth-based gravitational wave detectors. An incredible new test has demonstrated that space-based detectors could become a reality, which could open our ears to entirely new sources of gravitational waves. Read More >>

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Radio Brightening Around Monumental Neutron Star Collision Tells a Confusing Story

August’s landmark observation of two colliding neutron stars was incredible for its immediate impact on astronomy. It answered questions, like “where did the universe’s gold come from” and “how fast is the universe expanding?” But it left behind mysteries, too. Like, “what the hell is going on with those gamma rays?” Read More >>

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Can Scientists Figure Out Where Colliding Black Holes Come From?

When distant black holes (or neutron stars) collide, there’s a lot scientists can tell from the way they send gravitational waves rippling through space. That includes their masses, their distance, or how their spins line up with one another. But one question they’re still trying to figure out is, well, where are they? Read More >>

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Let’s Break Down What That Monumental Neutron Star Collision Actually Told Us

Astronomy has entered a new era, one where light and gravity both play a role in understanding the Universe’s craziest phenomena. On August 17, 2017, over 70 observatories around (and above) the world, including ones like LIGO and the Hubble Space Telescope, all spotted a flash of energy. This light came in many different flavors, and was consistent with a pair of dense neutron stars colliding in a cataclysmic “kilonova” explosion. Read More >>

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Colliding Neutron Star Discovery Could Solve This Mystery About Our Expanding Universe

Today, physicists across the world celebrated as telescopes and observatories on Earth and in space captured a “kilonova.” Two neutron stars collided 130 million light years away, sending gravitational waves, x-rays, gamma-rays, radio waves, and light waves to the Earth. But these events also serve as a new kind of tool—a tool with the potential to answer one of the most fundamental questions in our universe: How quickly is it expanding? Read More >>

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Observatories Across the World Announce Groundbreaking New Gravitational Wave Discovery

Vicky Kalogera, a Northwestern University physicist, took her week of much-needed vacation in Utah this past August. She promised her family she’d stay off of email for a week. It wasn’t a real promise, of course, but she was going to try. She’d arranged the perfect day for August 17. Her husband was going to take the kids hiking in Arches National Park while she’d spend the whole day at the spa. Right as she left her room, she just had to give her email a peep. The deluge brought the news: Telescopes and detectors across the world were making a monumental observation. Read More >>

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Incredible New Observation Shows Supermassive Black Holes Orbiting Each Other

You think our galaxy is special? Ha. Our boring pinwheel of gas and dark matter might be a nice hangout for humans. But 750 or so million light years away, there’s an elliptical galaxy, Galaxy 0402+379, whose two supermassive black holes are orbiting each other from a distance of only 24 or so light years. Their combined mass is around 15 billion times that of our Sun. Read More >>

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The Hunt for Gravitational Waves Is Officially Headed to Space

It took around a hundred years between Albert Einstein crafting his theory of general relativity and the confirmation of one of its wildest predictions, gravitational waves. So naturally, folks have been especially skeptical about funding expensive projects to look harder for them. But now that experiments are actually finding gravitational waves, scientists are ready to take the next step: Space. Read More >>

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Physicists Just Spotted Gravitational Waves Again – So What’s Next?

A long, long time ago, a pair of black holes collided with such power that they created ripples in spacetime, which emanated through the universe. All the while, molecules on a tiny rock in a fairly irrelevant nook of the Milky Way galaxy arranged themselves into living things, which evolved into self-aware apes. Those apes eventually realized they could actually measure those spacetime wobbles, and built several kilometer-long machines (tiny if you really think about it) in order to do so. When they flipped the switch, they caught the wobbles just in time. Read More >>

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Another Gravitational Wave Detector Will Help Revolutionise Astronomy

Last year, the pair of LIGO experiments announced a discovery a hundred years in the making: gravitational waves, tiny ripples in space time from a pair of colliding black holes a billion light years away. You might wonder what scientists will do with two giant gravitational wave detectors now that they’ve fulfilled their primary goal. Well, those ripples weren’t the end of the story—they were the start of a whole new saga in astronomy. Read More >>

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Catch Up on the Biggest Scientific Discovery of 2016 in Nine Minutes

A lot of cool science happened in 2016, but the obvious “holy shit!” moment came when physicists announced they’d confirmed the existence of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of spacetime first predicted by Albert Einstein in 1916. Read More >>

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The World’s Best Spacetime Ripple Detector Just Got Better

The world’s leading gravitational wave detector is back online and better than ever. After a series of upgrades, the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO) switched on yesterday. Physicists are already stoked about the cosmic collisions they’re going to measure during its next six-month run. Read More >>

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How to Make Your Own Gravitational Waves

Remember that time Stephen Colbert brought physicist Brian Greene on The Late Show to demonstrate the concept of gravitational waves with green lasers? Yeah, that was pretty awesome. Now there’s a handy DIY demonstration for those of us without access to that kind of technology, courtesy of science presenter Steve Mould. Read More >>