science
Why Bringing Back a Woolly Mammoth Is No Longer Science Fiction

Dr. George Church is a real-life Dr. Frankenstein. The inventor of CRISPR and one of the minds behind the Human Genome Project is no longer content just reading and editing DNA—now he wants to make new life. In Ben Mezrich’s latest book, Wooly: The True Story of the Quest to Revive One of History’s Most Iconic Extinct Creatures, Church and his Harvard lab try to do the impossible, and clone an extinct Woolly mammoth back into existence. Read More >>

game of thrones
Make Your Game of Thrones Knowledge Even More Pretentious With This Harvard Course

Harvard University, one of the most prestigious schools in the world, is now tricking students into learning medieval mythology by watching Game of Thrones. And Fox News says college doesn’t prepare kids for the real world. Read More >>

science
This Is The Best Way To Throw Things, Says Science

Sounds like it's been lots of fun in Yale's research labs lately: they've been busy finding the science-approved best way to throw things. Read More >>

facebook
Famous Dropout Mark Zuckerberg Will Get a Harvard Degree After All

Harvard just announced that Facebook founder and aspiring politician Mark Zuckerberg will deliver this year’s commencement address. As part of the deal, the university will give Zuckerberg an honorary degree and an honorary doctoral gown. This, despite the fact that Zuck dropped out of Harvard College in his second year. Read More >>

photography
You Can Now Do Harvard’s Photography Course Online (For Free)

Harvard University just made its 2009 photography course free to access online. The content is a little dated, but it is free, and still a great resource for levelling up your photography skills. Read More >>

history
Researchers Dig Into Boston’s Mysterious ‘Tsunami of Molasses’

In 1919, a holding tank filled with 2.3 million gallons of molasses ruptured and sent an enormous wave of goop through the streets of Boston. It enveloped and destroyed everything in its path—leaving 21 people dead and around 150 others injured. Until now, no one really knew why it was so deadly, but a team of scientists and students believe they’ve found a solution. Read More >>

3d printing
New 3D Printer Draws in Midair Like Magic

Lasers and metal were part of 3D printing for decades before the machines became affordable for personal use. But researchers at Harvard are demonstrating a new technique by which 3D metal structures can be printed in midair, without the need for anything supporting them. Read More >>

programming
This Adorable Robot Can Help Children to Program

Getting kids to code is a great idea—but it’s not always easy. Now a team of researchers from Harvard has developed this little robot, called Root, that’s designed to make writing code a more tangible experience. Read More >>

uncategorized
New Non-Stick Coating Will Stop Bacteria Clinging to Medical Materials

Once bacteria cling, it can sometimes be hard to make them let go as they accumulate and form adhesive biofilms. That's a particular problem on medical materials use for implants and instruments – but a new non-stick material might change things. Read More >>

3d printing
This £6k Machine Could Usher in the Era of 3D-Printed Electronics

The technology that would enable us to 3D-print electronics along with the circuits that make them work has been around for a while, but a team of Harvard researchers has now announced a new 3D-printer that could change the game. Soon, you could 3D print a drone in your living room – which, when you think about it, is insane. Read More >>

giz explains
How to Make a Soft Robot

Robots are often imagined as hard, shiny things, gleaming futuristic machines. They often are hard, shiny things. But sometimes they're soft and flexible, instead. Soft robotics is a growing field devoted to the squishier side of automated technology, and with the help of a new toolkit, you can get in on the action. Read More >>

robots
A Thousand Tiny Robots Swarming Into Shapes Like Intelligent Insects

Since the first crude automatons running on clockwork mechanisms, mankind has been working to build the perfect artificial copy of ourselves for centuries. But what's a more accurate recreation of a human? A robot made of various components and wires all cobbled together? Or one made of billions of tiny robots all working together like the atoms that make up everything around us? Read More >>

robots
This Origami Robot Assembles Itself and Walks Away in Under Five Minutes

The intricate folds of origami are infinitely useful across science, from designing safer airbags to building more resilient architecture. Here, though, the same principles are being applied to a self-assembling robot that uses a tiny micro-controller to transform itself from 2D to 3D, then walks away. Read More >>

research
Even Researchers are Using Google Street View to Measure Gentrification

Google Street View is an excellent way to watch your neighbourhood change. In fact, we've conducted our own informal surveys of urban transformation in Detroit, San Francisco, and Brooklyn. While our investigations were based on casual observation, now a pair of sociologists from Harvard are using Google Street View data to measure gentrification—and predict if those trends will continue. Read More >>