animals
Suffolk Goes Full Plague With Restriction Zones and Mass Chicken Cull

This winter looks like it's going to be another shocker for the UK's poultry farmers, as an outbreak of the H5 strain of the virus commonly bracketed in the bird flu category has been discovered. Read More >>

food
Experts Say Food Labels Should Come With Energy-Burning Calculations

That traffic light nonsense on the crisps should be replaced with a better system that's both scarier and easier to comprehend, with health experts finding that a more human explanation of how much exercise you have to do to burn off a food's calorie content works to reduce a person's chomping of the nice things. Read More >>

science
Study of So-Called ‘Abortion Reversal’ Stopped Early After Women Went to A&E With Serious Bleeding

New research out Thursday starkly highlights the dangers of so-called “abortion reversals,” an unproven practice condemned by most medical experts. Scientists were forced to prematurely end a trial of pregnant women testing out the procedure after three volunteers experienced severe haemorrhaging that sent them to the emergency room. Read More >>

science
Yet More Research Links Even Light Drinking to a Higher Cancer Risk

In a new study this week, researchers in Japan have found a link between lifetime drinking to an increased risk of cancer – only the latest bit of research to suggest that even light drinking over a lifetime can be bad for us. Read More >>

food
Iceland Launches Eat to Death Challenge for £15

To be fair to Iceland, you probably wouldn't die if you consumed its entire £15 Party Food Bundle straight from the oven by yourself on Christmas Eve, but you may perhaps need to block off the calendar until December 27 or so and get a few extra toilet rolls in. Read More >>

science
The Heart Wants What the Heart Wants, and It Wants You to Brush Your Teeth

Part of avoiding heart disease might involve brushing your teeth, suggests a study published this week. Researchers in Korea have found a clear link between good oral health and a lower chance of heart irregularities and serious heart failure. Read More >>

health
CBD Isn’t Just a Harmless Health Fad, U.S. FDA Warns

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration still isn’t cutting cannabidiol, or CBD, much slack. This week, the agency updated their stance on the cannabis-derived ingredient, warning the public that most products made with CBD on the market are untested, unregulated, and have the “potential to harm” users. It also issued more than a dozen warning letters to companies they claim are illegally selling CBD products. Read More >>

phones
“Problematic Smartphone Usage” is the New Scourge of the Kids

Psychiatric experts have got together to declare that smartphone addiction appears to be a very real thing, with research backing this up by identifying symptoms of "problematic smartphone usage" and behaviours mirroring those of addicts in nearly a quarter of young people. But will they still turn out OK and like normal adults? Read More >>

health
German Man Develops Fatal Infection After Being Licked By His Dog

An unassuming lick from a dog is being blamed for the death of an otherwise healthy German man. It’s a strange medical case involving a normally harmless bacterium, but experts say it’s nothing to worry about and that most of us can continue to let our dogs slobber all over us. Read More >>

health
Sterilisation Breakdown Potentially Exposes Nearly 1,200 Patients to Infectious Diseases

Nearly 1,200 patients at Goshen Hospital in the US state of Indiana may have been exposed to hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV because a technician missed an important step during the routine cleaning of surgical instruments. Read More >>

health
What Are We Most Likely Going to Be Dying From in the Future?

It is easy to be smug about the blindspots of the past. Lead paint, cigarettes, cocaine in Coca Cola – could they really not have known? Such are the things we think, as we heedlessly Juul, pump ourselves with radiation, and fill prescriptions for pills whose long-term side effects have yet to be determined. All of these things might turn out to be fine; and we are, in any case, more attuned than ever to the ways we might be killing ourselves, whether or not we choose to do anything about it. But the killers of the future – the causes and the sicknesses themselves – may not arrive in a form we’re expecting. For this week’s Giz Asks, we reached out to a number of experts for a clearer sense of what we’ll be dying from in the future. Read More >>

guns
Gunshot Survivors Are Traumatised for Years, Study Finds

The findings of a new study involving gunshot survivors are unlikely to surprise you – but they aren’t any less depressing. It suggests that many survivors are left physically and mentally devastated by their experience, even years later. Read More >>

health
Violent Stomach Bug Outbreak Forces 22,000 Students to Miss School

An entire school district in the US comprised of more than 40 schools has been closed down due to a violent stomach bug. The outbreak has provided about 22,000 students and 2,785 teachers and workers with an extended break. Read More >>

vaping
Doctors Report First Documented Case of ‘Popcorn Lung’ From Vaping

A Canadian teenager developed a life-threatening condition known as “popcorn lung” after several months of intense vaping, in the first medical case linking this chronic lung disease to e-cigarette use. Read More >>

fitbit
Guys, Fitbit Started Profiting Off Health Data Long Before Google Showed Up

Since news broke that Google bought Fitbit for $2.1 billion (£1.6 billion), one of the big questions was how that massive treasure trove of Fitbit data would be handled. Everyone saw what happened with Nest. As a company, Nest and its data operated separately for a long while, but earlier this year, Nest users were told to migrate their accounts. Their data was now Google’s data. The prospect has reportedly led some current Fitbit users to mull alternative options, citing distrust that Google would keep its word that Fitbit users’ data would remain private. Concerned Fitbit users have good reason to be wary – but truth be told, Fitbit started exploring ways to make money with your data a long time ago. Read More >>